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Hypoglycemia Signs And Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms And Signs

Hypoglycemia Symptoms And Signs

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) means that blood levels of glucose are too low. This condition is most commonly a complication of treatment for diabetes. Symptoms of hypoglycemia vary among people. When blood sugar levels drop, symptoms can include trembling, palpitations (fast or pounding heartbeat), sweating, clammy skin, and hunger. These are among the early symptoms of hypoglycemia. Other possible symptoms of low blood sugar can be lightheadedness, chills, nausea, and lack of coordination. If the low blood sugar levels persist, more serious symptoms develop, such as confusion, difficulty with thinking, and seizures. Eventually, coma may develop. Causes of hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs as a side effect of many treatments for type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are other rare causes for the condition, such as insulin-producing tumors (insulinomas) and certain medications. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms Hypoglycemia & Hyperglycemia

Signs & Symptoms Hypoglycemia & Hyperglycemia

More than 23 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, and each year 1.6 million people receive a new diagnosis of this disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with diabetes must carefully manage their blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels with diet, physical activity and medication to prevent diabetes complications and avoid hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Video of the Day When blood sugar levels drop below normal levels, a person may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia, such as nervousness, shakiness and hunger. He may sweat and feel dizzy, lightheaded and confused. Sleepiness, anxiety, confusion and difficulty talking are also signs that a person has hypoglycemia. A person who has hypoglycemia while sleeping may sweat profusely during sleep, experience nightmares or wake feeling tired and irritable. If hypoglycemia isn’t treated, the condition can worsen, causing more-severe symptoms such as fainting, confusion, clumsiness, seizures, coma and even death. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, most cases of hypoglycemia are mild, and consuming food or drink rich in carbohydrates helps bring blood sugar levels back to normal. People with diabetes may need to take glucose tablets to raise their blood sugar levels quickly and avoid hypoglycemia's complications. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar levels, occur when the body lacks insulin or cannot use insulin properly. High levels of sugar in the urine indicate hyperglycemia; frequently feeling thirsty and having to urinate often are also indicators of high blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, checking blood sugar levels often can help alert you to hyperglycemia before you feel symptoms. In many cases, reducing food intak Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms: The Telltale Signs And What To Do

Hypoglycemia Symptoms: The Telltale Signs And What To Do

Even when you do your best to manage your blood glucose, you might experience lows. These lows can be dangerous if you don’t act quickly. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar (blood glucose lower than 4.0 mmol/L)1 is a deficiency of glucose in your blood. The reference table below can help you quickly recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do. You may want to print it off and keep it handy as a reference for the first while. If your blood glucose levels are consistently low, speak with your healthcare team. Your diabetes management plan may need to be adjusted. Recognize and treat symptoms of hypoglycemia Signs to look out for What to do Feeling shaky or light-headed Nausea Feeling nervous, irritable or anxious Feeling confused or unable to concentrate Hunger Increased heart rate Sweating Headache Feeling weak or drowsy Numbness or tingling in your tongue or lips STEP 1: Treat it right away Mild and moderate lows(blood glucose lower than 4.0 mmol/L): Take 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrate, like2: 15 g of glucose tabs ¾ cup non-diet pop or juice 1 tbsp of sugar or honey 6 LifeSavers® Severe lows: If your blood glucose is less than 2.8 mmol/L or you feel confused or disoriented, somebody needs to help you. If you’re alert and able to swallow, they should give you 20 g of fast-acting carbohydrate, like2: 20 g of glucose tabs 1-2 tbsp of sugar or honey 1 cup non-diet pop or juice If you’re unconscious, someone needs to give you a glucagon injection and call 911. STEP 2: Wait and re-test After treating, wait 15 minutes and then test your blood glucose. If it’s still below 4.0 mmol/L, take 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrate. If your blood glucose is above 4.0 mmol/L and your next meal or snack is more than 1 hour away, have a snack of carbs and proteins (e.g. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

The Facts Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too low. Normally, your body keeps your blood glucose within a concentration range of 4.0 mmol/L to 8.0 mmol/L (about 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL). In order to do this, the body has mechanisms that involve the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas, as well as several other hormones. When blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin to encourage the movement of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. Insulin lowers the amount of glucose in your blood by signalling the cells in the body to use the glucose as fuel. Your body uses glucose as its main fuel. The brain requires a constant supply of blood glucose and will signal the adrenal glands to release two hormones called adrenaline and cortisol whenever blood glucose levels are low. The adrenaline and cortisol then signal the liver to convert the carbohydrates it stores (from the foods we eat) into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The pancreas is also involved in raising blood glucose levels if they fall too low. When blood sugar is low, the pancreas releases the hormone glucagon, which increases blood sugar by signalling the liver to convert stored carbohydrates into glucose and to create new glucose molecules from other substances (such as amino acids) in the liver. If these mechanisms don't work properly, the blood glucose remains too low and the brain won't be able to function normally. Causes Hypoglycemia can be caused by medications. Medication-related hypoglycemia occurs most commonly in people who have diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes (a type of diabetes where the pancreas does not make insulin). In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes it can occur when someone is given too much insulin or other Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia

Signs And Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia

Have you ever waited too long between meals to the point where you no longer feel like yourself? If you suffer from diabetes, you may be experiencing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Tammy Cost, a nurse practitioner at Good Samaritan Hospital explains signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, as well as treatment options. Related: Do I Need Diabetes Education? Hypoglycemia: Am I at Risk? Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar drops below 70mg/dl. When blood sugar drops to this level, it can be harmful to your health. Individuals who are on certain diabetes medications, including insulin and sulfonylureas, are at a higher risk for hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia: Common Symptoms "There are several symptoms, however, Everyone is different,” Tammy explains. “You might start to feel anxious, have an increased heartbeat, or an inability to sit still.” Additional symptoms include: Double vision or blurry vision Feeling cranky or acting aggressive Headache Hunger Shaking or trembling Sweating Hypoglycemia: Treatment Methods If you think you're experiencing low blood sugar, it's recommended that you test your sugar. If you're reading is below 70mg/dl, consume 15 grams of carbohydrates, wait 15 minutes, and then retest your blood sugar. Common items with 15 grams of carbs include: 4oz. of juice Four to five hard candies 6oz. (half a can) of regular soda or pop Packet of graham crackers If you treat your hypoglycemia, retest, and still have a level below 70mg/dl, retreat again with an additional 15 grams of carbs, wait an additional 15 minutes, and retest. “We recommend treating and testing twice,” Tammy says. “If glucose continues to remain low after two treatments, or if you're not able to treat yourself or your family member, call 911." Once your level drops to 40mg/dl or Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia & Dehydration

Signs & Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia & Dehydration

Hypoglycemia is a series of symptoms associated with low blood sugar. Dehydration happens when more fluid is expelled from the body than is replenished. Dehydration and hypoglycemia have several overlapping symptoms, and hypoglycemia can be indicative of dehydration. Features of Hypoglycemia Normally, sugars are digested and converted to glucose, which enters the bloodstream. The pancreas, alerted to the rise in blood-sugar levels, secretes insulin to stabilize them. With hypoglycemia, too much sugar is consumed, and the pancreas secretes excessive amounts of insulin, dragging blood-sugar levels below the point of stabilization. Symptoms Glucose is the body's main energy source. Lack of glucose can lead to confusion, visual impairment, anxiety, hunger, heart palpitations and sweating. Forgetfulness, blurry vision, emotional outbursts and sugar cravings are other common symptoms. Prevention/Solution Hypoglycemia is prevalent in diabetics, and in some pre-diabetics with insulin resistance. Non-diabetics experiencing bouts of hypoglycemia can manage blood sugar levels by eating small meals several times a day. Fasting increases the likelihood of a hypoglycemic episode. Dehydration Features Thirst, fatigue, muscle weakness, fever, heart palpitations, wrinkled skin and dry mouth are all signs of dehydration. Mild cases can be treated by drinking water and replenishing electrolytes. If severe vomiting, irritability, or disorientation occurs, medical care is necessary. Based in New Jersey, Wendy Travolta has been working as a professional freelance writer since October 2009. Her areas of expertise include holistic health and wellness, natural beauty and fashion. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low blood glucose or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below normal. For many people with diabetes, that means a level of 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or less. Your numbers might be different, so check with your health care provider to find out what level is too low for you. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Symptoms of hypoglycemia tend to come on quickly and can vary from person to person. You may have one or more mild-to-moderate symptoms listed in the table below. Sometimes people don’t feel any symptoms. Severe hypoglycemia is when your blood glucose level becomes so low that you’re unable to treat yourself and need help from another person. Severe hypoglycemia is dangerous and needs to be treated right away. This condition is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Mild-to-Moderate Severe Shaky or jittery Sweaty Hungry Headachy Blurred vision Sleepy or tired Dizzy or lightheaded Confused or disoriented Pale Uncoordinated Irritable or nervous Argumentative or combative Changed behavior or personality Trouble concentrating Weak Fast or irregular heart beat Unable to eat or drink Seizures or convulsions (jerky movements) Unconsciousness Some symptoms of hypoglycemia during sleep are crying out or having nightmares sweating enough to make your pajamas or sheets damp feeling tired, irritable, or confused after waking up What causes hypoglycemia in diabetes? Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of insulin or other types of diabetes medicines that help your body make more insulin. Two types of diabetes pills can cause hypoglycemia: sulfonylureas and meglitinides . Ask your health care team if your diabetes medicine can cause hypoglycemia. Although ot Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Vs Hypoglycemia: What’s The Difference?

Hyperglycemia Vs Hypoglycemia: What’s The Difference?

If you have diabetes, you’re likely well aware of the issues that can come with blood sugar levels that are too high—or too low. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may sound similar, but they can have very different consequences. Using too much or too little insulin can affect your blood sugar levels, but even if you aren’t diabetic, you should know that side effects of other medications, not eating enough (or eating too much), or even exercising more than usual can all affect your blood sugar. The scary part? Some people don’t have many symptoms, and may not be able to tell that their blood sugar is too high or too low without a glucose meter check. So what’s the difference, and how can you avoid hyper- and hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Low blood sugar can be caused by not eating enough food or a delayed meal, an unusual amount of exercise, and drinking alcohol without eating food. If you use insulin, you know that your blood sugar levels can go too low if you use too much of your medication. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include sweatiness, shaking, dizziness, confusion, a fast heartbeat, hunger, feeling weak or tired, feeling nervous or upset, or headache. Will I notice if my blood sugar is low? Maybe. You may experience some of the symptoms mentioned above like feeling sweaty, shaky, or dizzy; a fast heartbeat; or feeling hungry. However, some people don’t feel anything at all. Hypoglycemia unawareness is the term for not being able to tell if your blood sugar is low, and it can be very dangerous. How can I know if my blood sugar is low if I don’t notice any symptoms? You’ll need to use a blood glucose meter, which can determine the amount of sugar in your blood using a small drop of blood typically from you Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is when the amount of sugar in your blood drops to 70 mg/dL or lower. It’s important to speak with your health care provider about what is considered low blood sugar for you. Low blood sugar is something that you need to be prepared to treat. You might get low blood sugar if you: Take certain medicines and eat too few carbohydrates (starches) or skip or delay a meal Take too much medicine (ask your diabetes care team if this applies to you) Are more physically active than usual Low blood sugar can happen suddenly. But in most cases, you will notice the signs and symptoms. Recognize low blood sugar early and take action It is important to identify the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar early so you can do something before it gets worse. Special Alert The signs and symptoms of low blood sugar may be less clear after you have had many episodes of low blood sugar. Some signs and symptoms might be so hard to notice that you don’t react to them quickly. Hypoglycemia unawareness, also known as low blood sugar unawareness, is abnormally low blood sugar readings without the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. Weak or tired Hungry Dizzy or shaky Nervous or upset Sweaty Confused Like your mood is changing Like your head hurts Like your heart is beating too fast Like your eyesight is blurry What to do about low blood sugar Ask your health care provider what level of blood sugar is too low for you. For most people, it is 70 mg/dL or lower. Check your blood sugar right away if you have any symptoms of low blood sugar. If your blood sugar is low, or if you think your blood sugar is low, follow the 'Rule of 15.' This means treat your low blood sugar with 15 grams of carbohydrates (carbs). Wait 15 minutes. Test your blood sugar again, and if i Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Print Overview Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body's main energy source. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated with the treatment of diabetes. However, a variety of conditions, many of them rare, can cause low blood sugar in people without diabetes. Like fever, hypoglycemia isn't a disease itself — it's an indicator of a health problem. Immediate treatment of hypoglycemia involves quick steps to get your blood sugar level back into a normal range — about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL (3.9 to 6.1 millimoles per liter, or mmol/L) — either with high-sugar foods or medications. Long-term treatment requires identifying and treating the underlying cause of hypoglycemia. Symptoms Similar to the way a car needs gas to run, your body and brain need a constant supply of sugar (glucose) to function properly. If glucose levels become too low, as occurs with hypoglycemia, it can cause these signs and symptoms: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep As hypoglycemia worsens, signs and symptoms may include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness People with severe hypoglycemia may appear as if they're intoxicated. They may slur their words and move clumsily. Many conditions other than hypoglycemia may cause these signs and symptoms. A blood sample to test your blood sugar level at the time of these signs and symptoms is how to know for sure that hypoglycemia is the cause. When to see a doctor Seek a doctor's help immediately if: You have what may be symptoms of hypoglycemia an Continue reading >>

Practice Essentials

Practice Essentials

Hypoglycemia is characterized by a reduction in plasma glucose concentration to a level that may induce symptoms or signs such as altered mental status and/or sympathetic nervous system stimulation. This condition typically arises from abnormalities in the mechanisms involved in glucose homeostasis. The most common cause of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes is injecting a shot of insulin and skipping a meal or overdosing insulin. The image below depicts a diagnostic algorithm for hypoglycemia. Signs and symptoms The glucose level at which an individual becomes symptomatic is highly variable (threshold generally at < 50 mg/dL). Carefully review the patient's medication and drug history for potential causes of hypoglycemia (eg, new medications, insulin usage or ingestion of an oral hypoglycemic agent, possible toxic ingestion). The patient’s medical and/or social history may reveal the following: Diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency/failure, alcoholism, hepatic cirrhosis/failure, other endocrine diseases, or recent surgery Central nervous system: Headache, confusion, personality changes Ethanol intake and nutritional deficiency Weight reduction, nausea and vomiting Neurogenic or neuroglycopenic symptoms of hypoglycemia may be categorized as follows: Neurogenic (adrenergic) (sympathoadrenal activation) symptoms: Sweating, shakiness, tachycardia, anxiety, and a sensation of hunger Neuroglycopenic symptoms: Weakness, tiredness, or dizziness; inappropriate behavior (sometimes mistaken for inebriation), difficulty with concentration; confusion; blurred vision; and, in extreme cases, coma and death Reactive hypoglycemic include the following features: More common in overweight and obese people who are insulin-resistant Possible higher risk in patients with a family his Continue reading >>

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