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Hyperglycemia Headache

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

There Is Delayed Puberty, Muscle Weakness,

There Is Delayed Puberty, Muscle Weakness,

Oral Contraceptive Oligomenorrhea Headache Hyperglycemia This can, in turn, lead to more headaches.[migrainetrust.org] Some women find that their headaches and migraines improve when they start the pill; others notice that their headaches and migraine get worse.[migrainetrust.org] This has meant that unwanted effects like headaches and migraines, are much less likely to occur when they take the Pill.[migrainetrust.org] Launois Syndrome Oligomenorrhea Headache Hyperglycemia There is delayed puberty, muscle weakness, headache, perspiration; joint pain.[whonamedit.com] Symptoms related to the compressive effects of the tumor include headaches, visual disturbances such as bitemporal hemianopsia , and signs of hypopituitarism .[symptoma.com] Common side effects include shakiness, headache, fast heart rate, dizziness, serious side effects may include worsening bronchospasm, irregular heartbeat, and low blood potassium[wikivisually.com] Cushing's Disease Oligomenorrhea Hyperglycemia […] bruises easily skin injuries that are slow to heal acne fatigue muscle weakness glucose intolerance increased thirst increased urination bone loss high blood pressure a headache[healthline.com] Elevated cortisol levels may also put patients at risk for serious health complications, including osteoporosis and bone fractures, diabetes and hyperglycemia, cardiovascular[novartisoncology.com] […] symptoms include: Severe fatigue Muscle weakness Depression, anxiety and irritability Loss of emotional control Cognitive difficulties New or worsened high blood pressure Headache[mayoclinic.org] Prolactinoma Oligomenorrhea Headache […] for publication May 28, 2013 Short title: Cluster Headache and Pituitary Prolactinoma doi: Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache by definition not cause Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Type 2 Diabetes [hyperglycemia]

High Blood Sugar And Type 2 Diabetes [hyperglycemia]

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is one of the many results of having type 2 diabetes. Once you have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, blood sugar management is essential. If your blood sugar skyrockets over 600 milligrams per deciliter, then you could become dangerously dehydrated or go into a diabetic coma. Either of these conditions is life-threatening. Even if your blood sugar doesn’t go that high, there are still symptoms of having an elevated blood sugar. If you have type 2 diabetes and high blood sugar, you probably have questions about your condition. The following are the answers to four common questions people may have. Can high blood sugar cause headaches? Headaches effect nearly 45 million people in a given year. They range from mild to severe in intensity. Headaches fall into one of two categories: Primary headaches: These headaches come from an issue with the actual head itself. Examples of these are migraines, cluster headaches, and tension headaches. Secondary headaches: These headaches have nothing really to do with the head but result from some other problem. Some examples of secondary headaches include fever, stroke, anxiety, hormonal changes, eye problems, and diabetes. In other words, the headaches are secondary to the main illness or injury. Type 2 diabetes causes secondary headaches resulting from an unexpected change in your blood sugar. If your blood sugar spikes and stays past 250 milligrams per deciliter, you probably will begin experiencing symptoms. A headache is an indication that you need to check your levels. In addition to hyperglycemia, your blood sugar may dip too low and you’ll get a headache too. This condition is called hypoglycemia. Does high blood sugar make you tired? Often times people’s blood sugar becomes too high over Continue reading >>

Often Suffer From Headaches? You Should Be Worried

Often Suffer From Headaches? You Should Be Worried

Who hasn’t got a headache ever? I know there will be no one who could rise up a hand. Most often we ignore headaches and try to suppress it with aspirin or paracetamol but do you know diabetes and headaches could be related? It could be an indication that you are approaching abnormal blood glucose level. Now think again, is it wise to ignore your headache? Or is it time to check out your glucose level? When our body can’t produce enough insulin to process the carbohydrates that we take with our everyday meal, glucose level rises. The carbs are actually turned into glucose in our body and the glucose is like fuel for our cells. We get energy because our cells keep functioning with this fuel. Now, the problem is, glucose can’t get into our cells by itself. Here comes the helper! Insulin!! Insulin takes this glucose into our cells. Without enough insulin secretion, we will end up having high glucose level in our blood; this is how we become diabetic! And glucose as much as this, will lead to neuropathy or damage of nerves, exhaustion, severe headaches and if untreated this can cause death. So, don’t you just avoid headaches from now on! Let’s know about the types to stay alert. Headaches during Hyperglycemia: A patient is called hyperglycemic when too much sugar circulates in blood and as I have told earlier, the sugar level rises if there is not enough insulin to handle it. So, you have already figured out that hyperglycemia would be a hallmark of diabetes. And sugar of this much could lead to damage of nerve fibers and blood vessels. Headache is the most common early symptom of hyperglycemia or diabetes and headaches of this type often come with blurred vision, exhaustion and sometimes confusion.So, don’t ignore this one otherwise you have to pay a lot and su Continue reading >>

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Headaches can be debilitating, and patients with diabetes can get headaches from blood sugars dropping too low or climbing too high. As if we didn’t have enough to think about, right? There are many factors that can trigger headaches or even migraines, and blood sugar fluctuations are just one of those factors. The key to avoiding blood sugar-related headaches is keeping blood sugars from spiking or dropping too rapidly. For example, when you are treating a low blood sugar, don’t go on a high carbohydrate-eating binge, even though you may be ravenous. Eat a sensible meal with some protein as directed by your healthcare provider. When blood sugar is too low One of the suspected causes of low blood sugar-caused headaches has to do with the blood vessels in your brain. Your brain needs a readily available supply of glucose in order to function properly. If the brain senses it does not have enough sugar, blood vessels in the brain can spasm, triggering a headache. In the fasting state, stress hormones are also released which can cause vasoconstriction leading to headache. There is also a type of headache that can be seen in patients with diabetes that experience frequent low blood sugars, which are followed by rebound high blood sugars. This rebound phenomenon is often due to hormones that the body releases in response to a low blood sugar in an attempt to regulate itself. When blood sugar is too high High blood sugars can cause l Continue reading >>

Is Your Diabetes A Pain In The… Head?

Is Your Diabetes A Pain In The… Head?

An Explanation of the Diabetes Headache What is causing your diabetes headache? Is it your blood sugars? Your new treatment? What exactly is going on? You’ve recently been placed on insulin for management of your diabetes. Your head is pounding. You have a history of migraines. Is the headache caused by your diabetes, or is it a migraine? Well, sometimes it can be hard to tell. However, diabetes can certainly contribute to diabetes headaches. It is important to note that having diabetes does not mean that you’ll get headaches. However, the more your blood sugar levels fluctuate, the more likely you are to have headaches related to your diabetes. When your blood sugar has a rapid drop, your brain senses that it doesn’t have enough glucose to function properly and the blood vessels in your brain can then spasm, causing a headache. When your sugars quickly climb too high, you will feel that familiar lack of concentration and sluggishness (like a food coma). If this goes on too long, your body will try to eliminate excess sugars through increased urination, which can cause dehydration. And, as we know, dehydration can cause headaches. Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia is when your blood sugar level is at or below 70 mg/dl. However, if your blood sugar levels are consistently high, you may have symptoms of hypoglycemia at a higher level. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include headaches (of course!), shakiness, sweatiness, dizziness, anxiety, confusion, and hunger. Hyperglycemia is when your blood sugar level is at or above 180 mg/dl. A headache is a common symptom of hyperglycemia, although often you may have no symptoms associated with hyperglycemia. However, symptoms typically become more apparent the higher the blood sugar level. When your blood sugar levels vac Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia, postprandial hypoglycemia, or sugar crash is a term describing recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia occurring within 4 hours[1] after a high carbohydrate meal in people who do not have diabetes.[2] The condition is related to homeostatic systems utilised by the body to control blood sugar levels. It is variously described as a sense of tiredness, lethargy, irritation, or hangover, although the effects can be less if one has undertaken a lot of physical activity within the next few hours after consumption. The alleged mechanism for the feeling of a crash is correlated with an abnormally rapid rise in blood glucose after eating. This normally leads to insulin secretion (known as an insulin spike), which in turn initiates rapid glucose uptake by tissues either accumulating it as glycogen or utilizing it for energy production. The consequent fall in blood glucose is indicated as the reason for the "sugar crash".[3]. A deeper cause might be hysteresis effect of insulin action, i.e., the effect of insulin is still prominent even if both plasma glucose and insulin levels were already low, causing a plasma glucose level eventually much lower than the baseline level[4]. Sugar crashes are not to be confused with the after-effects of consuming large amounts of protein, which produces fatigue akin to a sugar crash, but are instead the result of the body prioritising the digestion of ingested food.[5] The prevalence of this condition is difficult to ascertain because a number of stricter or looser definitions have been used. It is recommended that the term reactive hypoglycemia be reserved for the pattern of postprandial hypoglycemia which meets the Whipple criteria (symptoms correspond to measurably low glucose and are relieved by raising the glucos Continue reading >>

Headache After Eating Sugar: Hypoglycemia Vs. Hyperglycemia

Headache After Eating Sugar: Hypoglycemia Vs. Hyperglycemia

Scientific research is becoming more conclusive that blood glucose levels can be a factor in headache formation. Two disorders that seem to be underlying causes of headaches are hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Either of the conditions can be headache triggers, with hyperglycemia typically associated with migraines and hypoglycemia typically associated with standard headaches. The level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood changes in response to dietary intake and pharmaceutical drugs (one reason medications can trigger a rebound migraine). It is controlled by hormones, especially insulin and adrenaline, which keep blood sugar from getting too high or low. The level increases when we eat, then goes back down. The body is designed to keep the blood sugar level within a healthy range. Consumption of refined sugars and fasting (as when crash dieting) can push the glucose levels outside normal parameters, resulting in a sugar headache. Refined sugar is particularly problematic because our biochemistry has adapted over time to properly metabolize naturally occurring sugars. Many scientists have become convinced that our bodies are incapable of processing refined sugars, especially at the high quantities they exist in the modern diet. During refining, a natural sugar from a plant has its nutrients and fiber removed, components that allow the sugar to be absorbed, stored, and metabolized without experiencing overload. Hyperglycemia vs. hypoglycemia Any sugar that we consume eventually is converted into blood glucose. The speed at which glucose enters the blood differs based on the type of sugar. Refined sugars can be headache triggers because when eaten, the level in the blood rises quickly (hyperglycemia). Our bodies overreact by releasing huge quantities of insulin. In response Continue reading >>

Thunderclap Headache Without Hypertension In A Patient With Pheochromocytoma.

Thunderclap Headache Without Hypertension In A Patient With Pheochromocytoma.

Abstract Pheochromocytoma is a well known, catecholamine-producing tumor characterized by hypertension, headache, hyperglycemia, hypermetabolism, and hyperhydrosis. Approximately 65% of cases of pheochromocytoma were shown to be associated with hypertension. A case of pheochromocytoma that presented with thunderclap headache (TCH) and palpitations is reported. The patient never showed hypertension during the course of the disease. Paroxysmal headache and palpitations led to the identification of the underlying condition, and the final diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination of a surgical specimen. Pheochromocytoma should be identified as a less common although important cause of TCH. In addition, due to its lack of utility in identifying this disorder, negative cranial imaging may impede further investigation of extracranial lesions that may be the cause of a patient's headache. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II, headache attributed to pheochromocytoma usually develops concomitantly with an abrupt increase in blood pressure. In our case, however, hypertension was never observed, even when the patient was symptomatic. This is the first report of a case of pheochromocytoma with TCH without hypertension. Continue reading >>

Neuroendocrine Tumor: Symptoms And Signs

Neuroendocrine Tumor: Symptoms And Signs

ON THIS PAGE: You will find out more about body changes and other things that can signal a problem that may need medical care. To see other pages, use the menu. People with a neuroendocrine tumor may experience the following symptoms or signs. Sometimes, people with a neuroendocrine tumor do not have any of these changes. Or, the cause of a symptom may be another medical condition that is not cancer. Symptoms of pheochromocytoma High blood pressure Anxiety attacks Fever Headaches Sweating Nausea Vomiting Clammy skin Rapid pulse Heart palpitations Symptoms of Merkel cell cancer Painless, firm, shiny lumps on the skin that can be red, pink, or blue Symptoms of neuroendocrine carcinoma Hyperglycemia, which is a high level of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a sugar that is converted into energy by the body. Hyperglycemia causes frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger. Hypoglycemia, which is a low level of glucose in the blood. It causes fatigue, nervousness and shakiness, dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, seizures, and fainting. Diarrhea Persistent pain in a specific area Loss of appetite or weight loss A cough or hoarseness that does not go away Thickening or lump in any part of the body Changes in bowel or bladder habits Unexplained weight gain or loss Jaundice, which is the yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes Unusual bleeding or discharge Persistent fever or night sweats Headaches Anxiety Gastric ulcer disease Skin rash Some people also experience nutritional deficiencies before a diagnosis, such as niacin and protein deficiency. Others develop this symptom later. If you are concerned about any changes you experience, please talk with your doctor. Your doctor will ask how long and how often you’ve been experiencing the symptom(s), in Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Definition Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar (glucose) level. Hyperglycemia is defined as too high a blood sugar (glucose) level. Description As you regulate your blood glucose and keep your diabetes record, there are two problems that you need to be able to recognize and treat (with your personal physician’s advice): hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia, or an insulin reaction, can happen if you are taking insulin or oral medications. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose. This reaction happens when there is not enough glucose in your blood. A hypoglycemic reaction usually comes on very suddenly. It often happens at the time when insulin action is at its peak, during or after strenuous exercise or when a meal is delayed. Most people learn to recognize their own symptoms to an insulin reaction. If you begin feeling any symptoms or think your blood glucose may be too low, the best way to be sure is to check your blood level using a blood glucose test strip. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dl, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, is the condition found in individuals with diabetes, either insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent. Causes The most common causes of hypoglycemia are: 1. too much insulin, 2. too much exercise, or 3. not enough food Hyperglycemia usually occurs slowly, over several hours or days. It may be caused by: 1. not taking enough insulin 2. illness (such as a cold or flu) 3. infection 4. eating too much 5. stress 6. certain medications Symptoms Symptoms that you may notice with hypoglycemia are: sweating weakness anxiety trembling fast heartbeat inability to think straight irritability grouchiness hunger headache sleepiness Signs and sympto Continue reading >>

Migraines And Diabetes

Migraines And Diabetes

Migraines and diabetes. Is there a connection? Although the two diseases can be comorbid, statistics don’t show that people with Migraine are more likely to have diabetes than people with Migraine; nor do they show that people with diabetes are more likely to have Migraine disease. One study did show that, among Migraineurs, those who have Migraine with aura have diabetes more commonly than those who have Migraine without aura.1 No reason was identified for this. As with any condition, diabetes can, however impact Migraine attacks, and Migraine attacks can impact diabetes. Our bodies are their own ecosystem. Everything affects everything else. Many Migraineurs report that missing a meal or needing to fast triggers a Migraine attack. Peroutka makes a quite accurate observation, “The Migraine patient does not react well to change from within or without.”2 He goes on to remark about Migraine triggers that are changes in sleep patterns, hormone levels, weather, and diet to say: “These seemingly diverse trigger factors are all united in that they all cause physiologic “stress” to the nervous system, and each may activate the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), as evidenced by the release of stress-related neurotransmitters and hormones such as norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol.”2 Some Migraineurs also report that eating sugar or a large amount of carbohydrate also triggers a Migraine. Both missing a meal or fasting and eating sugar or a large amount of carbohydrates are stressful to the body. Fasting can cause the depletion of glycogen stored in the liver. Eating a large amount of carbohydrates can cause reactive hyperglycemia (increased blood glucose levels). To avoid these triggers, it’s recommended that Migraineurs eat on a regular schedule. Peroutka Continue reading >>

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