diabetestalk.net

Hyperglycemia Headache

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Blood sugar control is at the center of any diabetes treatment plan. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a major concern, and can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes . There are two main kinds: Fasting hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 130 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) after not eating or drinking for at least 8 hours. Postprandial or after-meal hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 180 mg/dL 2 hours after you eat. People without diabetes rarely have blood sugar levels over 140 mg/dL after a meal, unless it’s really large. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause damage to your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. It can also lead to other serious conditions. People with type 1 diabetes are prone to a build-up of acids in the blood called ketoacidosis. If you have type 2 diabetes or if you’re at risk for it, extremely high blood sugar can lead to a potentially deadly condition in which your body can’t process sugar. It's called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). You’ll pee more often at first, and then less often later on, but your urine may become dark and you could get severely dehydrated. It's important to treat symptoms of high blood sugar right away to help prevent complications. Your blood sugar may rise if you: Eat too many grams of carbohydrates for the amount of insulin you took, or eat too many carbs in general Have an infection Are ill Are under stress Become inactive or exercise less than usual Take part in strenuous physical activity, especially when your blood sugar levels are high and insulin levels are low Early signs include: Increased thirst Trouble concentrating Frequent peeing Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blood sugar more than 180 mg/dL Ongoing high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Diabetes is a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin, or cannot use it properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. Diabetes does not usually cause headaches. But, while headaches are not dangerous, they may be an indication of poor blood sugar control in a person with diabetes. Over time, periods of continuous high or low blood sugar can lead to serious and even life-threatening health complications, such as heart disease and kidney failure. This article looks at the connection between diabetes and headaches and suggests ways to relieve diabetes-induced headaches. Contents of this article: Types of headache According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, there are over 150 types of headaches. Broadly speaking, headaches can be classified as either primary or secondary: Primary headaches are ones that are not linked to another medical condition. Examples of primary headaches include migraines and tension headaches. Secondary headaches are caused by underlying medical conditions or health issues and include the type of headache often experienced by people with diabetes. Other causes of secondary headaches include: hormone fluctuations infection nerve disorders overuse of medication trauma The pain associated with either primary or secondary headaches can vary in severity and duration. Some people may not experience headaches often, while others can get a headache several days each week. Depending on the type of headache, other symptoms may be present. For example, migraines can be linked with nausea and increased sensitivity to sound or light. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

Headache In Diabetes—occipital Neuropathy

Headache In Diabetes—occipital Neuropathy

Go to: CASE HISTORIES Case 1 A woman of 59 with a 21-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus reported severe left-sided headache of sudden onset. She had already experienced a remarkable series of neuropathic episodes—right 4th nerve palsy (age 54); right 3rd nerve palsy with pupillary sparing (57); left 7th nerve palsy (58); right 6th nerve palsy (58); right ophthalmic trigeminal neuralgia (58); acute painful peripheral neuropathy (59). In the present instance the headache was characterized by unilateral occipito-parietal stabbing pains radiating to the frontal region and scalp tenderness in the occipital region. She was frequently kept awake at night by the pain and said she could not bear to put her head on the pillow, the contact causing an exacerbation. She had no sensory loss in the cervical root distribution and no occipital tenderness. She had experienced the pain for the first time about 2 years previously, when it lasted for four to six months on and off and then moved to the contralateral side of her head. The pain was typically neuralgic in nature, and was felt to be yet another manifestation of mononeuritis multiplex. Carbamazepine only helped a little and she was intolerant of tricyclic antidepressants. The pain settled spontaneously a few months later. The following year she developed another mononeuropathy—left maxillary trigeminal neuralgia. Case 2 A woman aged 37 with a 14-year history of uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus developed severe left-sided occipito-parietal headaches. Her glycaemic control had formerly been very good, but had deteriorated about 2 years before the onset of headaches. The agonizing stabbing pains initially lasted a few seconds at a time, but subsequently increased in duration to a few hours at a time. She reported an Continue reading >>

How To Manage A Diabetic Headache

How To Manage A Diabetic Headache

Diabetic Headache – What Is It? When I look at a referral before seeing a new patient, I always look at the doctor’s notes. Often, I’ll see “repeat” patients – I saw them several months ago, and we made changes to their insulin regimen, their blood glucose log was emailed to me, but then the patient stopped following up. They are then sent back to me because their hemoglobin A1C has increased – from 8.5% to 12.0%. And their chief complaint? A headache. Oh – and they are barely checking their blood sugar levels, which means they are rarely giving insulin. The Diabetic Headache The patient tells me that “all of a sudden” they started getting headaches or migraines, but their doctor won’t provide them with any migraine medication. Obviously, I’m not a physician. I don’t know for sure that this patient isn’t getting migraines, but I can read between the lines – that their headaches are related to their blood sugar levels as opposed to migraines. I explain this to the patient – gently. Having diabetes does not automatically mean that someone will get headaches. In fact, many people with diabetes do not get headaches related to their condition. However, if they do get frequent headaches, it is most likely related to extremes in blood sugar levels – hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia is a blood sugar that is greater than 180 mg/dL. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar that is less than 70 mg/dL. A headache can be a symptom of either of these blood sugar levels – and it can also be a sign of a greatly varying blood sugar. For example, if someone’s headache was 80 mg/dL before a meal and they forgot to inject insulin according to the pizza they ingested – their blood sugar may go up dramatically. There are cases where some people may g Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Thunderclap Headache Without Hypertension In A Patient With Pheochromocytoma.

Thunderclap Headache Without Hypertension In A Patient With Pheochromocytoma.

Abstract Pheochromocytoma is a well known, catecholamine-producing tumor characterized by hypertension, headache, hyperglycemia, hypermetabolism, and hyperhydrosis. Approximately 65% of cases of pheochromocytoma were shown to be associated with hypertension. A case of pheochromocytoma that presented with thunderclap headache (TCH) and palpitations is reported. The patient never showed hypertension during the course of the disease. Paroxysmal headache and palpitations led to the identification of the underlying condition, and the final diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination of a surgical specimen. Pheochromocytoma should be identified as a less common although important cause of TCH. In addition, due to its lack of utility in identifying this disorder, negative cranial imaging may impede further investigation of extracranial lesions that may be the cause of a patient's headache. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II, headache attributed to pheochromocytoma usually develops concomitantly with an abrupt increase in blood pressure. In our case, however, hypertension was never observed, even when the patient was symptomatic. This is the first report of a case of pheochromocytoma with TCH without hypertension. Continue reading >>

What Cause Headaches In Diabetes?

What Cause Headaches In Diabetes?

People suffering from diabetes are highly susceptible to headaches. In fact, persistent headache is an obvious sign of diabetes. Diabetes headaches can be due to various reasons. Hyperglycemic Headaches Hyperglycemia is a term that refers to having too much glucose circulating in the blood as a result of lack of insulin production in the pancreas, or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a serious condition since high concentrations of glucose can be toxic to the blood vessels and the nerves. According to health experts, headache is considered an early symptom of hyperglycemia and is usually accompanied with fatigue, confusion and blurred vision. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can lead to the buildup of ketones which are waste products in both the urine and blood. Buildup of ketones that can lead to coma and death. Hypoglycemic Headaches Hypoglycemia happens when there is too little amount of glucose in the blood for the body to use for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanaged your insulin therapy. If you do not have diabetes, not eating enough nutrients like carbohydrates, which the body needs to breakdown to glucose, may result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the main source of energy for the brain. Without enough glucose our brains are not able to function properly. According to the American Heart Association, dull headache is an early sign of hypoglycemia and can come with other related symptoms like cloudy vision, dizziness, sweating, confusion and tremors. If you do not eat sufficient carbohydrates, like fruits, pasta, breads or juices, hypoglycemia can lead to loss of consciousness, convulsions and even death. Glaucoma Headaches If you’re suffering from diabetes, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

We’ve all had headaches. Some more than others, I suspect. I woke up the other morning with a pounding headache, as a matter of fact. Having a headache is definitely not the way to start your day. Perhaps not surprisingly, people who have diabetes can certainly get headaches, and apart from the “usual” culprits, these headaches can stem from fluctuations in blood sugar. There are ways to treat and manage them, however. Read on to learn more. What is a headache anyway? Simply put, a headache is a pain that occurs in any part of the head — on the side, in the front, or in the back. The type of headache pain can vary widely, from sharp, to dull, to throbbing. And the frequency of pain may be different — the pain may come on all of a sudden, or more gradually, and it can last an hour or last days. Types of headaches A headache is a headache, right? Not exactly. There are two main forms of headaches: primary and secondary. A primary headache is due to a problem with or overactivity of pain structures in the head, such as blood vessels, nerves, or muscles. Examples of primary headaches include: • Migraines • Cluster headaches • Tension headaches Secondary headaches occur as a symptom of a disease or condition, such as: • Blood clot • Brain aneurysm • Brain freeze (also known as “ice cream headache”) • Brain tumor • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Flu • Ear infection • Sinus infection • Stroke • Concussion • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) • Panic attacks • Changes in hormones Why might diabetes cause headaches? Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll automatically have headaches. However, diabetes headaches tend to occur due to changes in blood sugar levels. The more “up and down” your blood sugars are, the more likely Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

About Diabetes & Diabetic Headache When your body's ability to use or produce insulin gets impaired, it gives way to a disease known as diabetes. Insulin is a hormone which helps the body to use glucose or sugar derived from the food we eat to give us energy or store it for future use. Made in the pancreas, insulin also helps prevent the blood sugar levels from getting both too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia). There are 2 types of Diabetes. In the Type 1 Diabetes, the pancreas in unable to produce insulin without which excess amounts of sugar remain in the blood, become toxic over time and lead to headaches, blindness, neuropathy and fatigue. In Type 2 Diabetes, cellular resistance to insulin occurs in the body and is not diagnosed till severe symptoms such as diabetic headaches start to reveal itself. Understanding what a diabetic headache or the symptoms of a diabetic headache is not easy and in some cases the patient is unable to bear the pain associated with the same. Let us analyze what a diabetic headache feels like. What Does a Diabetic Headache Feel Like? The cause of the diabetic headache determines its feeling and extent. There are certain symptoms and signs which help determine the type of diabetic headache that you are suffering from. Let us analyze each of these types of diabetic headaches and the feeling associated with it. High blood glucose of hyperglycemia occurs when there is insufficient production of insulin in the pancreas or the body develops cellular resistance to the same. Occurring in both types of diabetes, it can prove to be fatal for some patients as the high concentration of glucose in the blood can prove toxic for the blood nerves or vessels. The problem with this condition is that many patients are unable to feel the symptom Continue reading >>

Halloween Headache

Halloween Headache

Halloween Headache I was describing to a patient about Halloween Headache. Usually found in kids, but also present in adults is the phenomenon that one experiences a ‘sugar-overload’ headache days after Halloween. When sugar levels are too high (hyperglycemia), a headache may occur – including symptoms of frequent urination, frequent thirst, blurred vision and fatigue. So here are our top tips to avoid Halloween Headache and still have fun! Hydrate Drink up! With late night walks door knocking, or Halloween parties where you may be standing for long periods in your outfit – remember to keep hydrated. This will help your muscles, nerves, ligaments and organs function well during the sugar overload. Be picky When you look at your bag of treats or the food table, choose things that nourish you. If nothing on the table/in the bag nourishes you, be selective with your treats. Do you really need another red snake? Cadbury or Lindt? Pick items with a higher cocoa percentage which usually means less sugar. Donate the rest! Give non-edible gifts Fidget spinners, toy cockroaches, puzzles are great ideas to give at the door. Gives the kids something to do and keeps them occupied after Halloween. Make Halloween 1 day, not Halloween week Enjoy your treats over the day, but throw or donate the rest afterwards. Like Christmas, we can over-cater and Halloween night ends up being Halloween week or even month! Focus back on eating whole foods. Get moving! Burn off the sugar and go for a gentle walk or jog. Best way to get rid of sugar is to move and get the blood flowing. Have a great Halloween and remember everything in moderation. If you have persistent pain and reoccurring symptoms, please see your health professional. Advice is not to diagnose any conditions, simply anecdotal Continue reading >>

There Is Delayed Puberty, Muscle Weakness,

There Is Delayed Puberty, Muscle Weakness,

Oral Contraceptive Oligomenorrhea Headache Hyperglycemia This can, in turn, lead to more headaches.[migrainetrust.org] Some women find that their headaches and migraines improve when they start the pill; others notice that their headaches and migraine get worse.[migrainetrust.org] This has meant that unwanted effects like headaches and migraines, are much less likely to occur when they take the Pill.[migrainetrust.org] Launois Syndrome Oligomenorrhea Headache Hyperglycemia There is delayed puberty, muscle weakness, headache, perspiration; joint pain.[whonamedit.com] Symptoms related to the compressive effects of the tumor include headaches, visual disturbances such as bitemporal hemianopsia , and signs of hypopituitarism .[symptoma.com] Common side effects include shakiness, headache, fast heart rate, dizziness, serious side effects may include worsening bronchospasm, irregular heartbeat, and low blood potassium[wikivisually.com] Cushing's Disease Oligomenorrhea Hyperglycemia […] bruises easily skin injuries that are slow to heal acne fatigue muscle weakness glucose intolerance increased thirst increased urination bone loss high blood pressure a headache[healthline.com] Elevated cortisol levels may also put patients at risk for serious health complications, including osteoporosis and bone fractures, diabetes and hyperglycemia, cardiovascular[novartisoncology.com] […] symptoms include: Severe fatigue Muscle weakness Depression, anxiety and irritability Loss of emotional control Cognitive difficulties New or worsened high blood pressure Headache[mayoclinic.org] Prolactinoma Oligomenorrhea Headache […] for publication May 28, 2013 Short title: Cluster Headache and Pituitary Prolactinoma doi: Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache by definition not cause Continue reading >>

Often Suffer From Headaches? You Should Be Worried

Often Suffer From Headaches? You Should Be Worried

Who hasn’t got a headache ever? I know there will be no one who could rise up a hand. Most often we ignore headaches and try to suppress it with aspirin or paracetamol but do you know diabetes and headaches could be related? It could be an indication that you are approaching abnormal blood glucose level. Now think again, is it wise to ignore your headache? Or is it time to check out your glucose level? When our body can’t produce enough insulin to process the carbohydrates that we take with our everyday meal, glucose level rises. The carbs are actually turned into glucose in our body and the glucose is like fuel for our cells. We get energy because our cells keep functioning with this fuel. Now, the problem is, glucose can’t get into our cells by itself. Here comes the helper! Insulin!! Insulin takes this glucose into our cells. Without enough insulin secretion, we will end up having high glucose level in our blood; this is how we become diabetic! And glucose as much as this, will lead to neuropathy or damage of nerves, exhaustion, severe headaches and if untreated this can cause death. So, don’t you just avoid headaches from now on! Let’s know about the types to stay alert. Headaches during Hyperglycemia: A patient is called hyperglycemic when too much sugar circulates in blood and as I have told earlier, the sugar level rises if there is not enough insulin to handle it. So, you have already figured out that hyperglycemia would be a hallmark of diabetes. And sugar of this much could lead to damage of nerve fibers and blood vessels. Headache is the most common early symptom of hyperglycemia or diabetes and headaches of this type often come with blurred vision, exhaustion and sometimes confusion.So, don’t ignore this one otherwise you have to pay a lot and su Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

9.3 Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia

9.3 Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia

The overlapping symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycemia (e.g., hunger, sweating, trembling, confusion, irritability, dizziness, blurred vision) make the two conditions difficult to distinguish from one another (Paradalis, 2005). Since the treatment is different for each condition, it is critical to test the patient’s blood glucose when symptoms occur. The risk factors that may have led to the condition, and the recent medical history of the patient also help to determine the cause of symptoms. Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a condition occurring in diabetic patients with a blood glucose of less than 4 mmol/L. If glucose continues to remain low and is not rectified through treatment, a change in the patient’s mental status will result. Patients with hypoglycemia become confused and experience headache. Left untreated, they will progress into semi-consciousness and unconsciousness, leading rapidly to brain damage. Seizures may also occur. Common initial symptoms of hypoglycemia include: Cold, clammy skin Weakness, faintness, tremors Headache, irritability, dullness Hunger, nausea Tachycardia, palpitations These symptoms will progress to mood or behaviour changes, vision changes, slurred speech, and unsteady gait if the hypoglycemia is not properly managed. The hospitalized patient with type 1 or type 2 diabetes is at an increased risk for developing hypoglycemia. Potential causes of hypoglycemia in a hospitalized diabetic patient include: Receiving insulin and some oral antidiabetic medications (e.g., glyburide) Fasting for tests and surgery Not following prescribed diabetic diet New medications or dose adjustments Missed snacks Hypoglycemia is a medical emergency that must be treated immediately. An initial blood glucose reading may confirm suspicion of hypoglycemia. If yo Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar