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Hyperglycemia Anxiety

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Conditions Linked To And Confused With Panic Disorder

Conditions Linked To And Confused With Panic Disorder

There are two medical conditions that come up very frequently in consideration of panic disorder. They are said variously to be confused with the disorder because of a similarity of symptoms or to be related to it because they occur together. They are reactive hypoglycemia and mitral valve prolapse. The more important condition is reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia means low blood sugar. It is not an illness but simply a physical finding. It can be caused by a number of conditions of varying seriousness, and in turn can cause a variety of symptoms which seem at first glance to resemble those of a phobia. These include lightheadedness, shakiness, sweating, weakness and fatigue, nervousness, fast heart- beat, blurring of vision, and tingling of lips and tongue- among others. They are relieved promptly by raising the blood sugar to a proper level. The terms “reactive hypoglycemia” or “functional hypoglycemia” are used vaguely to refer to a condition in which someone for undiscovered, or undiscoverable, reasons overreacts to the ingestion of sugars by a rise and then an abrupt fall in blood sugar levels, precipitating the symptoms listed above. There is some doubt about whether reactive hypoglycemia actually exists. There is no question that the great majority of times the diagnosis is made, it is made in error. Anxious people (often phobics who are concerned about the possibility of suffering some obscure physical illness) come to the attention of a careless physician who performs a glucose tolerance test and without further investigative procedures informs them that they have hypoglycemia, which will have to be treated by eating five or six meals a day for the rest of their lives. Or the patients may be self-diagnosed, matching up their symp Continue reading >>

Is Stress Messing With Your Blood Sugar?

Is Stress Messing With Your Blood Sugar?

Researchers have linked dozens of physical symptoms to stress overload, from fatigue to weight gain. You can add another symptom to that list: high blood sugar. (Heal your whole body with Rodale's 12-day liver detox for total body health.) When you're stressed, your body is primed to take action. This "gearing up" is what causes your heart to beat faster, your breath to quicken, and your stomach to knot. It also triggers your blood glucose levels to skyrocket. "Under stress, your body goes into fight-or-flight mode, raising blood sugar levels to prepare you for action," says Richard Surwit, PhD, author of The Mind-Body Diabetes Revolution and chief of medical psychology at Duke University in Durham, NC. If your cells are insulin resistant, the sugar builds up in your blood, with nowhere to go, leading to hyperglycemia. We have no shortage of short-term stress in our lives—from traffic jams to working long hours at a demanding job—and our stress hormones, which were designed to deal with short-term dangers like fleeing predators, are turned on for long periods of time, even though we're neither fighting nor fleeing. What we're doing is stewing, which can cause chronically high blood sugar. A prescription to take it easy The good news is, simple relaxation exercises and other stress management techniques can help you gain more control over your blood sugar, according to a study conducted at Duke University. More than 100 people with high blood sugar took five diabetes education classes either with or without stress-management training. After a year, more than half of the stress-relief group improved their blood sugar levels enough to lower their risk for the worst complications, such as heart disease, kidney failure, nerve damage, and vision problems. Study participan Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

Stress And Anxiety And Hyperglycemia - From Fda Reports

Stress And Anxiety And Hyperglycemia - From Fda Reports

Hyperglycemia is found among people with Stress and anxiety, especially for people who are female, 40-49 old, take medication Seroquel and have Depression. This review analyzes which people have Hyperglycemia with Stress and anxiety. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 549 people who have Stress and anxiety from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you have Stress and anxiety and Hyperglycemia, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who have Stress and anxiety and Hyperglycemia Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

Changes in blood sugar can have a significant impact on how a person feels, including emotionally, because of how sugar affects not just the brain but the entire body. In addition, emotions can also affect how the body regulates blood sugar. Anyone with persistently high or low blood sugar should talk to a doctor to determine if an underlying condition is to blame. Blood sugar is affected by a variety of factors, including food. Blood sugar rises in the hour or two after a meal and then gradually declines. Foods high in carbohydrates can lead to higher spikes in blood sugar, followed by a more rapid decline. Physical activity causes the muscles to burn glucose, leading to lower blood glucose levels. Some medications can affect blood glucose levels, and stress can also lead to an overall increase in blood sugar. Blood Sugar Effects on Emotions Abnormally high or low blood sugar can affect emotions. Unusually low blood sugar --- also known as hypoglycemia --- can cause feelings of anxiety and confusion. Hypoglycemia can also make it hard to complete routine tasks and can lead to abnormal behavior. High blood glucose, on the other hand, can cause fatigue. Persistently high blood glucose due to poorly treated diabetes may also worsen depression. Stress Effect on Blood Sugar The link between emotions and blood sugar goes beyond the symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycemia, as emotions can also affect blood sugar. Stress, whether emotional or physical, leads to the release of hormones such as cortisol and epinephrine. Both of these hormones can cause a rise in blood glucose levels. People with diabetes already have trouble regulating blood sugar, so emotional stress can lead to dangerously high blood sugar levels. Managing Blood Sugar and Emotions Persistently high or low blood su Continue reading >>

Depression And Anxiety In Pregnant Women With Diabetes Or Mild Hyperglycemia

Depression And Anxiety In Pregnant Women With Diabetes Or Mild Hyperglycemia

Abstract Introduction: A number of physical and psychological changes that occur during pregnancy can stimulate the development of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. The study evaluated psychological aspects related to maternal depression and anxiety in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia, contrasting the results with those of non-diabetic pregnant women. Method: In a prospective and longitudinal approach, two questionnaires were applied and validated for use in Brazil, the Beck depression inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The questionnaires were applied to pregnant women at the first prenatal visit or at the time of disease diagnosis (T1) and reapplied at admission for delivery (T2). Regardless of the degree of hyperglycemia, both at first and in the second stage most women had severe anxiety trait. In early pregnancy (T1), however, severe state anxiety was more frequent in women with hyperglycemia than in those from the NG group. Results: Most pregnant women showed moderate state anxiety over their pregnancy, regardless of glycemic status. In early pregnancy, however, severe state anxiety was more prevalent in hyperglycemic women than in those with normal glycemic status. Most women showed moderate trait anxiety and mild depression in both early and late pregnancy, irrespective of glycemic status. Conclusion: The incidence of severe state anxiety in early pregnancy is more frequent in women with diabetes or hyperglycemia, but their levels of trait anxiety and depression are not affected by glycemic status. Continue reading >>

7,724 Possible Causes For Anxiety + Formication + Hyperglycemia In Usa

7,724 Possible Causes For Anxiety + Formication + Hyperglycemia In Usa

Acute Amphetamine Intoxication Anxiety Chronic Anxiety Formication The differential diagnosis includes hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hypoxia, metabolic encephalopathy, and thyrotoxicosis, as well as other drug intoxications.[psychiatrictimes.com] Confusion or agitation Bruxism Stroke caused by acute amphetamine toxicity Cutaneous findings are as follows: Skin flushing Infected deep ulcerations (ecthyma) in patients with formication[emedicine.medscape.com] Formication —The sensation of bugs creeping on the skin.[encyclopedia.com] Hypoparathyroidism Anxiety Formication It results in hypocalcaemia. tetany: peripheral paresthesia, carpopedal spasm, seizures emotional lability, depression and anxiety, psychosis short stature There are a number[radiopaedia.org] […] may include: Numbness around mouth or in hands or feet Uncontrollable, painful spasms of the face, hands, arms, and feet Seizures Low blood pressure Emotional instability, anxiety[stanfordchildrens.org] […] may include: Weakness Muscle crampsor twitching Pain Difficulty with walking Tingling around the mouth, fingers, and toes Excessive nervousness Loss of memory Mood swings Anxiety[uvahealth.com] Hyperglycemia Aggressive Behavior Agitated Delirium Agitation Akathisia Alopecia Apathy Atrial Flutter Blurred Vision Bounding Pulse Cardiac Arrhythmia Cardiomyopathy Compulsive Behavior Confusion Congenital Abnormality Diarrhea Digitalis Toxicity Dizziness Drug-induced Impotence Dyskinesia Explosive Diarrhea Fine Tremor Frontal Headache Giddiness and Lightheadedness Grand Mal Epilepsy Granulomatous Lung Disease Graves Disease Halitosis Hallucinations Hand Tremor Headache Heart Sounds Exaggerated Hyperreflexia Hypertension Inappropriately Happy Affect Increased Libido Irritability Lethargy Loss of Appetite Manic Beha Continue reading >>

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Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.mdlinx.com something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.226.223.19 on 2017-12-30 02:14:16 UTC. Trace: 6899e377-c783-470d-8467-515e68ae3e06 via f142fe30-0da7-428a-92b2-8a74e399b4ec Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Diabetes And Anxiety

Tips For Managing Diabetes And Anxiety

A few weeks ago I was in Siem Reap, Cambodia, with one of my oldest and closest friends. After an amazing day hiking and visiting the temples of Angkor Watt, we rewarded ourselves with a nice dinner in town. After programming my pump for my dinner bolus, as I returned to chatting with my friend, I felt the familiar feeling of my insulin pump vibrating. When it continued beyond the normal length, I double-checked. “Button Error.” During my entire 12 years of using an insulin pump, I had never received this error. I didn’t even know what it meant. Soon after, my pump stopped working and major anxiety set in. Anxiety is normal part of life, for everyone. Symptoms of anxiety include general feelings of worry, being “keyed up,” or on edge, racing heart and sweating. In the most basic form, anxiety is our body’s way of telling us to pay attention, because something important, fearful or unusual is going on. In many situations, anxiety is adaptive and helpful. Anxiety before a test can motivate us to study and anxiety about walking down a street alone at night can help deter us from potentially dangerous situations. For individuals with diabetes, anxiety is an extremely common issue. Not only do we have to all of life’s normal issues to contend with, but we also have the stress and anxiety that come with managing a chronic disease. Even in situations less severe than the one I described above, feelings anxiety related to the complexity and expense of self-management and blood sugar control, potential long-term complications, and hyperglycemic or hypoglycemic episodes are common. When anxiety becomes severe and overly intrusive, an anxiety disorder is often diagnosed. Anxiety disorders are also common among individuals with diabetes, and 13% of young adults with d Continue reading >>

Neuroendocrine Tumor: Symptoms And Signs

Neuroendocrine Tumor: Symptoms And Signs

ON THIS PAGE: You will find out more about body changes and other things that can signal a problem that may need medical care. To see other pages, use the menu. People with a neuroendocrine tumor may experience the following symptoms or signs. Sometimes, people with a neuroendocrine tumor do not have any of these changes. Or, the cause of a symptom may be another medical condition that is not cancer. Symptoms of pheochromocytoma High blood pressure Anxiety attacks Fever Headaches Sweating Nausea Vomiting Clammy skin Rapid pulse Heart palpitations Symptoms of Merkel cell cancer Painless, firm, shiny lumps on the skin that can be red, pink, or blue Symptoms of neuroendocrine carcinoma Hyperglycemia, which is a high level of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a sugar that is converted into energy by the body. Hyperglycemia causes frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger. Hypoglycemia, which is a low level of glucose in the blood. It causes fatigue, nervousness and shakiness, dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, seizures, and fainting. Diarrhea Persistent pain in a specific area Loss of appetite or weight loss A cough or hoarseness that does not go away Thickening or lump in any part of the body Changes in bowel or bladder habits Unexplained weight gain or loss Jaundice, which is the yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes Unusual bleeding or discharge Persistent fever or night sweats Headaches Anxiety Gastric ulcer disease Skin rash Some people also experience nutritional deficiencies before a diagnosis, such as niacin and protein deficiency. Others develop this symptom later. If you are concerned about any changes you experience, please talk with your doctor. Your doctor will ask how long and how often you’ve been experiencing the symptom(s), in Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Without Diabetes

Hyperglycemia Without Diabetes

The term Hyperglycemia is derived from the Greek language, wherein 'hyper' means excessive; 'glyc' means sweet; and 'emia' means 'of the blood'. So if we join all these terms together, then hyperglycemia would mean excessive sweetness in the blood, which in simple term means 'high blood sugar'. Now, whenever we think of high blood sugar, we immediately associate it with diabetes. Though, there is nothing wrong with that, as the most common cause for a person to suffer from hyperglycemia is diabetes, it is not always the case! Like whenever we experience chest pain, we associate it with heart problem, but then there are several other conditions including anxiety attack that can cause the same. Hyperglycemia without diabetes can occur due to various causes including, stress, eating, drugs and certain health conditions. In fact, it is normal to experience high blood sugar levels soon after eating, for a short period. All this and more will be explained as you continue reading this article. Causes of Hyperglycemia Other than Diabtetes As we are discussing the condition wherein hyperglycemia is caused without the presence of diabetes, we will not be discussing diabetes, but other conditions that can cause the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia. These symptoms include frequent thirst and urination, increased hunger, blurred vision, and fatigue. Though these signs and symptoms are pretty much the same as in case of diabetes, the sole reason being that diabetes is the main cause of people suffering from hyperglycemia, it is not necessary that you will experience these signs only in case of diabetes. Mentioned below are some conditions that can be responsible for the same. Drugs and Medications Immunosuppressives that are used to treat autoimmune diseases can also lead to hyper Continue reading >>

Top Causes Of Unexplained Hyperglycemia

Top Causes Of Unexplained Hyperglycemia

As you know, many of my postings are based on clinical experience (as well as from my spies on this site). This past week a mother of one of my patients asked if I could blog about unexplained hyperglycemia. We are not talking about forays into fast food restaurants with “neon” signs (as one expert diabetes educator used to quip) but rather despite perfect carbohydrate counting, proven insulin/carbohydrate ratios and insulin sensitivity factors, blood sugars still spike without obvious explanation. One must always keep in mind when trying to analyze the reasons for highs (and lows), that at best, we are trying to approximate the magical workings of the pancreas (particularly the beta cells). Understanding pancreatic infrastructure in relation to the interaction of the beta cells and alpha cells, as well as other types of cells, also may be a piece of the puzzle related to glycemic control. Any attempt to mimic pancreatic function is still evolving in sophistication, at best. What would be the most common causes of “unexplained” hyperglycemia? I would divide these causes into four major categories: 1. Food related (explainable…but less obvious at the surface) 2. Mechanical difficulties 3. Physiological Counter-regulatory hormone response. 4. No idea 1. Food related: Hyperglycemia may occur at a different time that one might expect due to the company of other nutrients associated with carbohydrates. Examples include hyperglycemia that occurs hours after the pasta/pizza/high fat/protein concentrated meal. These meals do not have to consist of fast food with hidden carbohydrates. Hyperglycemia occurs due to the slower absorption of carbs secondary to the presence of fat and protein. Strategies are available to counteract this process including employment of the ex Continue reading >>

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