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How To Use Glucose Tablets

Glucose Tablets Vs. Glucose Gummies

Glucose Tablets Vs. Glucose Gummies

My pancreas went kaput almost 19 years ago. In that span of time, I’ve consumed countless glucose tablets to cure low blood sugars. I’ve tried all sorts of brands and flavors to see what I liked best, because if I’m forced to eat something, I might as well enjoy it as much as possible. I’ve come to the conclusion that no matter who produces glucose tablets into whichever flavor varieties, they will still essentially be the same thing: chalky discs of pure sugar meant to be scarfed down in the event of a hypoglycemic episode. Yes, I have demonstrated a preference for tropical flavored tablets over the years, and no, I don’t miss the days of punching rectangular tablets out from foil wrapping and being mystified as to how they achieved “pleasant orange flavor” despite their pure white appearance. Despite my obvious taste for some glucose tablets over others, I maintain some resentment towards them for being a boring (but super effective) low treatment. Before you say, “Wait, why don’t you try gels?”, let me explain why I shy away from them. In my experience they’re 1) messy/sticky and 2) less portable than tablets. I also think that it’s more cost-effective to buy economy-size bottles of glucose tablets (good for at least a dozen lows) than to spend money on little four-packs of gels (good for only four lows). But that’s just my opinion. What exactly am I getting at here? Well, until recently, I thought that I was resigned to stick with glucose tablets as a low treatment. Sure, I can use real food/juice to cure lows (and I do), but if I’m having a particularly symptomatic low, there’s something about treating it with glucose tablets—I know that they’ll work more quickly than virtually anything else I could consume. So even though they get Continue reading >>

Using Glucose Tablets

Using Glucose Tablets

If you experience any of the symptoms of hypoglycemia detailed earlier—especially hunger—measure blood sugar. If blood sugar is 10 mg/dl or more below target, chew enough glucose tablets to bring blood sugar back to your target. If you have no symptoms but discover a low blood sugar upon routine testing, again, take enough glucose or nizagara tablets to bring blood sugar back to your target. Having no symptoms is not a valid reason for not taking tablets. A low blood sugar without symptoms carries more risk than one with symptoms. If you weigh about 140 pounds and your blood sugar is 60 mg/dl but your target is 90 mg/dl, then you might eat 4 Dextrotabs. This would raise your blood sugar, according to Table 20-2, by 32 mg/dl, bringing you to 92 mg/dl. If you are using Dextro-Energen, you’d take 1. tablets.With B-D tablets, you’d take 1. Simple. If your low blood sugar resulted from taking too much insulin or OHA, it may continue to drop after taking glucose if the insulin or OHA hasn’t finished working. You should therefore recheck your blood sugar about 45 minutes after taking the tablets, to rule out this possibility and to see if you’re back where you belong. If blood sugar is still low, take additional tablets. If you have delayed stomach-emptying, you may have to wait as much as 2 or more hours for full effect.* What if you’re out of your home or workplace and don’t have your blood sugar meter? (A major crime, as noted earlier.) If you think you’re hypoglycemic, play it safe and take enough tablets to raise your blood sugar about 60 mg/dl (7 Dextrotabs, for example, or 2 B-D tablets) You may worry that this will bring you too high. If you take insulin, this poses no problem. Simply check your blood sugar when you get back to your meter. If it ’s Continue reading >>

Use Of Dietary Sugars Or Glucose Tablets In Correcting Hypoglycemia

Use Of Dietary Sugars Or Glucose Tablets In Correcting Hypoglycemia

Proponents may suggest an advantage of one over the other, but the data is not so clear. With tighter control of blood glucose and lower recommended blood levels, the risk of development of hypoglycemia in the face of diabetes is on the rise, necessitating the use of self-administered treatments by diabetes patients who are experiencing mild to moderate symptomatic hypoglycemia. To date, in the conscious hypoglycemic patient, the accepted method of correction has been administration of oral glucose, either in the form of commercially available tablets or dietary sugars. Until recently, the comparative benefits between these two treatment options has not been clearly determined, giving rise to the question, is there a clear advantage of one over the other? To date, most studies investigating this issue have been quite small, and of questionable design. In a recent issue of the British publication Emergency Medicine Journal, investigators conducted a systematic review of the literature and identified 1,774 unique papers focused on effects of the treatment options on relief of symptomatic hypoglycemia, time to resolution, blood glucose levels, development of complications, and hospital lengths of stay (if admission were required as a result of the hypoglycemic episode). Following a defined screening process, four total articles were selected for data pooling and meta-analysis. Three of the articles were randomized controlled trials, with the fourth being an observational study. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model to calculate heterogeneity (I2), pooled plots and treatment effect using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcomes with 95% CIs. The pooling of outcomes data was per Continue reading >>

What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

Glucose tablets are composed of glucose sugar and other ingredients such as flavoring, preservatives and binding agents. Used mainly by people with diabetes, glucose tablets help to treat low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. You can purchase different brands of glucose tablets from most drugstores. Keep them on hand in case of hypoglycemia, especially if you take insulin or oral diabetes medication. Video of the Day Low Blood Pressure Signs If you have diabetes, you may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia if your blood sugar falls below 70 milligrams per deciliter of blood, although you should speak with your health care provider about your individual blood sugar goals. The symptoms of hypoglycemia include feeling shaky, dizzy, sleepy, confused, angry, anxious, sad or hungry -- or having a rapid heartbeat, lack of coordination and tingling or numbness of your lips or tongue. Hypoglycemia is dangerous because it can lead to seizure, unconsciousness and even death if blood glucose continues to fall and is untreated. Fast-Acting Carbs If you have hypoglycemia symptoms, check your blood sugar if you can. The American Diabetes Association recommends taking 15 to 20 grams of carbohydrates if your blood sugar is indeed below 70 milligrams per deciliter. The amount of carbohydrate grams in one glucose tablet varies depending on the brand, so you should read the nutrition facts label. The Joslin Diabetes Center says that about three glucose tablets is 15 grams of carbohydrates. After consuming 15 to 20 grams of carbohydrates -- roughly three to four glucose tablets -- rest for 15 minutes while waiting for your blood glucose to rise. After 15 minutes, recheck your blood sugar. If it is still low -- less than 70 milligrams per deciliter, according to the Joslin Diabetes Ce Continue reading >>

Why Carry Glucose Tablets: An Overview Of Hypoglycemia

Why Carry Glucose Tablets: An Overview Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is also known as low blood sugar. People with diabetes monitor their blood sugar levels to avoid this condition. From diabetic testing to using glucose tablets, there are ways to avoid hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is when your blood sugar is too low. Symptoms of low blood glucose include blurred vision, rapid heartbeat, nervousness, aggression, crankiness, hunger, headaches, trouble sleeping, confusion, shakiness, numbness, tingling, tiredness and weakness. Very low blood sugar may cause fainting, seizure or possibly a coma. Have diabetic testing supplies on hand to check your blood sugar. Symptoms can mimic high or low sugar so always use diabetic testing strips to verify levels. Certain oral medications commonly used to treat diabetes may cause hypoglycemia. Sulfonylureas include glipizide, glimepiride and glyburide. These pills stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin and may put you at risk for hypoglycemia. All types of insulin shots can cause hypoglycemia as well. Low blood sugar is caused by skipping or delaying meals or eating meals that are too small. Drinking alcohol can lower your blood sugar. Increased physical activity may also cause hypoglycemia. Driving with hypoglycemia is dangerous because you may have trouble seeing clearly, difficulty concentrating and might not be able to react quickly. Always check your blood sugar before driving when driving for an hour or more and on insulin. During long trips, check blood sugar levels frequently and eat snacks. If your blood sugar level drops, stop for treatment. Your blood sugar should stabilize before driving again. Reactive hypoglycemia happens to people who do not have diabetes. Blood sugar levels drop within four hours after eating. In most instances, the meal has a high level of carbohydrates Continue reading >>

What Are Glucose Tablets?

What Are Glucose Tablets?

ANSWER Glucose tablets are chewable sugar used by people with diabetes to raise their blood sugar quickly when it drops dangerously low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. These products also come in a variety of flavors and forms such as gels, liquids, and powders. If you take a medication that makes you prone to this problem, your doctor may tell you to carry glucose tablets with you -- especially during exercise. Continue reading >>

Chemist Direct | What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

Chemist Direct | What Are Glucose Tablets Used For?

To immediately increase the blood glucose levels after hypoglycaemia sets in, use glucose tablets in the correct strength to reduce symptoms. Diabetic people who suffer from the condition known as hypoglycaemia, or sudden low blood sugar levels that fall below 70 mg/dl, often need to immediately consume some form of glucose to boost blood sugar back to a safe reading. Using glucose tablets , which contain glucose sugar, flavouring agents, preservatives and binding agents, can give immediate aid and help you avoid serious complications. If this is a common occurrence you should seek the advice of your healthcare provider about how to set safe blood sugar level goals and how to best achieve them. If you are diabetic and taking some form of insulin or other medication such as chromium and you start feeling dizzy, sleepy, or confused and experience a faster heartbeat you need to immediately check your blood sugar levels. If the insulin dose was too much, the energy is burned faster and you then experience hypoglycaemic symptoms. In addition to this, you could feel a prickling or a lack of feeling in your lips or tongue, and a lack of physical coordination or feel confused emotions such as anger, sadness, hunger or anxiousness. If left untreated and blood glucose continues to fall, it can cause seizures, unconsciousness and in extreme cases, death. If you feel that you may be experiencing hypoglycaemia you can quickly eat or drink food items with 15-20 grams of carbohydrates to try to get your levels back to normal. If food is not easily available you may want to use glucose tablets for your hypoglycaemia condition. Be sure to ask your doctor for a prescription and purchase them at your local pharmacy. Glucose tablets are convenient and portable but check the label to see h Continue reading >>

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Glucose is a form of natural sugar that is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy, and all the cells and organs in your body need glucose to function properly. Glucose as a medication is given either by mouth (orally) or by injection. Glucose is used to treat very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), most often in people with diabetes mellitus. Glucose is given by injection to treat insulin shock (low blood sugar caused by using insulin and then not eating a meal or eating enough food afterward). This medicine works by quickly increasing the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose is also used to provide carbohydrate calories to a person who cannot eat because of illness, trauma, or other medical condition. Glucose is sometimes given to people who are sick from drinking too much alcohol. Glucose may also be used to treat hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in your blood). Glucose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use. You should not take glucose tablets, liquid, or gel if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in these forms of the medicine. If possible before you receive a glucose injection, tell your doctor if you have: diabetes (unless you are using this medicine to treat insulin-induced hypoglycemia); heart disease, coronary artery disease, or history of a stroke; Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your caregivers or call your doctor right away if you have: redness, swelling, warmth, or skin changes where an injection was given; a Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs.Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets . Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like orange juice, contain mostly fruct Continue reading >>

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

Dextrose Chewable Tablets

Dextrose Chewable Tablets

Generic Name: Dextrose Chewable Tablets (DEKS trose) Brand Name: BD Glucose Uses of Dextrose Chewable Tablets: It is used to treat low blood sugar. What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Dextrose Chewable Tablets? If you have an allergy to this medicine (dextrose chewable tablets) or any part of this medicine. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. This medicine may interact with other drugs or health problems. Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine (dextrose chewable tablets) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. What are some things I need to know or do while I take Dextrose Chewable Tablets? Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Check your blood sugar as you have been told by your doctor. Do not give the oral drug to someone who has passed out. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using this medicine (dextrose chewable tablets) while you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby. How is this medicine (Dextrose Chewable Tablets) best taken? Use this medicine as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instru Continue reading >>

F.a.q. Dex4

F.a.q. Dex4

How many tablets does it take to restore natural blood sugar levels? There isnt a clear-cut answer, so discuss it with your doctor. Each tablet contains a precise dosage of glucose (4 grams.) The ADA recommends that a person take approximately 15g of glucose if there is a lowering in blood sugar. If your blood sugar level is 50mg or less, increase the dose to 20g. If after 15 minutes, the levels dont balance out, repeat the process. How long before the tablets begin working? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:53:58+00:00 It usually takes a few minutes. Be sure to discuss how much you take with your doctor. Do they contain fat, sodium, or caffeine? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:53:16+00:00 No, but they do not contain animal products. Is Dex4 gluten-free? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:32:52+00:00 Yes, all FDA tests have shown Dex4 products to be gluten-free. Why dont I see an expiration date on the package? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:31:11+00:00 Glucose is a sugar, and it has no expiration date. The tablets may harden with time, but will remain just as effective. Where should I store my tablets? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:29:34+00:00 Part of what makes Dex4 so great is convenience. You can store Dex4 in your desk, in your pocket or purse, and most anywhere else. Most medical professionals recommend that people carry some form of glucose with them in case of lowered blood sugar. What is dextrose? Dex4 2017-07-20T14:23:45+00:00 Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Glucolift All-natural Glucose Tablets

Frequently Asked Questions About Glucolift All-natural Glucose Tablets

How much glucose is in each tablet? Each GlucoLift® tablet contains 4 g of fast acting carbohydrate. How long do the tablets last? As long as they are kept dry, they should behave exactly the same no matter how old they are. Since we use natural colors (and not artificial food dyes, which are often derived from coal tar) our tablets will change in appearance over time as the colors fade. This change in appearance does not affect the way the tablets impact blood sugar levels. What is the difference between GlucoLift® and other tablets? There are a number of important differences which make GlucoLift a better option. The first thing most people notice is the taste. The main difference is the quality of the ingredients. GlucoLift All-Natural glucose tablets contain no artificial food dyes/colors, or artificial flavors. Why does it matter that GlucoLift® All-Natural Glucose Tablets were created by a person with diabetes? The people who understand products best are the people who have to use them everyday. GlucoLift® was created by a person with diabetes who saw several ways that existing glucose tablets could be improved. Since then, we continue to get feedback from other people with diabetes telling us that GlucoLift® has addressed many of their concerns with glucose tablets as well. If you have any suggestions about other ways that we could make our tablets even better, we would love to hear from you. You can reach us by e-mailing [email protected] What else is in GlucoLift besides Glucose? Not much. You can see the full nutritional info here. How many tablets should i take? The American Diabetes Association recommends taking 15 to 20 g of glucose to treat hypoglycemia and retesting in 15 min. That translates to between 4 and 5 GlucoLift tablets. Some people find Continue reading >>

Why Glucose Tablets Really Are Best For Hypoglycemia

Why Glucose Tablets Really Are Best For Hypoglycemia

It often comes as a surprise to people without diabetes when I inform them that the biggest immediate risk for anyone with Type 1 diabetes is not high blood sugar, but low blood sugar. Me: I need some sugar, I’m running low. My well-intentioned but misinformed companion: You can’t have sugar, you’re diabetic! “Can’t have sugar” is the CliffsNotes version of diabetes that most of the world understands, but we know it’s a far more complicated and nuanced condition than a simple prohibition on eating cookies. We have to be masters of physiology. We have to understand how ALL the foods we eat interact internally and how those interactions affect the rise in our blood sugar. And nowhere is that more important than when we are dealing with hypoglycemia. Now, I have committed the sin of treating a low with a brownie or a candy bar before. We all have. It’s just so tempting! I mean, when else can you say, with ANY truth at all, that you have a medical need for dessert?!? “I’m low, give me another slice of pie!” “Looks like I need some ice cream!” Our health-care providers, educators, and all the literature in the world tells us we should treat a low with glucose tablets, juice, or another source of straight, fast-acting glucose rather than these other indulgent (and generally high-fat) treats. But why? Why can’t I have a cookie when I’m low? What’s so great about those chalky, OK-tasting-but-not-at-all-exciting glucose tablets? The answer is in the fat! We’ve all heard of the “pizza effect,” right? It’s that highly annoying phenomenon where we have to split our insulin dose because food that contains a high percentage of fat messes with the absorption of carbohydrates. Specifically, it delays that absorption. When I have pizza, I will see Continue reading >>

Glucose Tabs

Glucose Tabs

Glucose tabs look like candy. But they sure don’t taste as good. That’s the point. When you go hypo from too much insulin or sulfonylurea and too little food, you need to act quickly to bring your blood glucose level back to normal. Nothing does that better than a little glucose. Too much glucose, on the other hand, will send your level in the other direction – too high. That’s not good either. The solution is to take just a few glucose tabs – three or four of them depending on the brand. You want to get a total of 15 grams of glucose when you go low. Then you wait 15 minutes and if necessary take 15 more grams of glucose. That’s what one manufacturer, Paddock Laboratories, calls “the rule of 15". This is the only company that makes both glucose tabs and gels. Are glucose tabs or gels better? It depends, says Jeff Myers, a diabetes life and wellness coach in Loveland, Colorado. His Web site, Well Balance: Diabetes Life Coaching, describes the services that he can offer to complement those of your health care team. “I find the 15 gram glucose gel tubes to be OK in an emergency,” Jeff tells me, “but not user friendly for more frequent adjustments in everyday life situations.” He says that these include addressing a dropping blood glucose level: When he is driving a car and doesn’t want too eat much Before going to sleep When camping in a tent Before or during a meeting at work During an athletic activity (with water) when he wants small, measured increments of carbs (although he prefers and typically uses real food; other athletes he knows like the simplicity and accuracy of glucose tabs). Jeff usually uses the Dex 4 tablets from Can-Am Care. “At $5 to $6 per bottle of 50 they are among the most affordable,” Jeff says. “And they have four ple Continue reading >>

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