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How To Make A Glucose Solution

Glucose Injection (solution For Injection)

Glucose Injection (solution For Injection)

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Glucose Injection (Solution for injection). Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) WHAT IS IN THIS LEAFLET? This leaflet contains information about Glucose Injection MINIJET. Please read it carefully and keep it for future reference. The information in this leaflet is only a summary and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have any comments or questions. WHAT IS GLUCOSE? Glucose is a sugar and is the basic chemical from which the body derives its energy. WHEN IS GLUCOSE USED? Glucose injection is given to diabetic patients who become unconscious because they have not eaten enough after receiving their insulin injection. It is occasionally used in people who are severely ill with alcohol intoxication. As glucose may be used in medical emergencies, the injection may be given by paramedical personnel such as ambulance or nursing staff. WHO SHOULD NOT HAVE GLUCOSE INJECTIONS? The only people who should not have glucose injections are those who have ischaemic heart disease, those who already have too much glucose in their blood or who are severely dehydrated and those who are allergic to corn or corn products. BEFORE YOU HAVE A GLUCOSE INJECTION If you are conscious you should tell your doctor if you: have ischaemic heart disease are a diabetic are an asthmatic are an alcoholic have any other illness are taking any medicine and what they are have kidney disease have ever had an allergic reaction to glucose are allergic to corn or corn products are pregnant are breast feeding. SIDE EFFECTS OF GLUCOSE As with any other medicine, some side effects may occur. Some patients experience a warm flush all over a Continue reading >>

How To Prepare 500 Ml Of 0.025 M Of Glucose Solution? | Physics Forums

How To Prepare 500 Ml Of 0.025 M Of Glucose Solution? | Physics Forums

1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data: I am using a virtual chemistry laboratory and the directions for the first lab experiment says to prepare 500 mL of 0.025 M of glucose solution by diluting the 1 M glucose solution. (I am re-posting this question due to the fact that the previous one was deleted because it wasn't placed in the appropriate forum.) Prepare: 500 mL of 0.025 M of glucose solution by diluting the 1 M(1 Mole) of glucose solution with distilled water. I am not sure what to do here and I don't know what I am supposed to multiply. I tried adding the diluted water to it, but it said that it would overflow because I had added 400 mL of the diluted water. It said to indicate in the report, which solutions were mixed together and the amounts of each, but I am not sure how to mix them. I take it the M stands for Moles? And mL stands for mililiters. Do I divide 500 by 1000mL first? Correct. To make 500 mL of a 0.025 M solution of glucose, you would take 12.5 mL of a 1 M solution of glucose, and add water to that until the final volume is 500 mL. An easier way remember this approach is the formula M1V1 = M2V2. In this case, the calculation would be 1M * V1 = 0.025M * 500mL. If you solve for V1 you would get 12.5 mL (essentially the same calculations as you presented above, just placed into one single formula). Alternatively, you can calculate the "fold dilution." 1 M / 0.025 M = 40, so you are performing a 40-fold dilution. That means you would take 500 mL/40 = 12.5 mL of 1M glucose and dilute to 500 mL. Correct. To make 500 mL of a 0.025 M solution of glucose, you would take 12.5 mL of a 1 M solution of glucose, and add water to that until the final volume is 500 mL. An easier way remember this approach is the formula M1V1 = M2V2. In this Continue reading >>

Glucose 10% W/v Solution For Infusion

Glucose 10% W/v Solution For Infusion

provide a source of sugar (carbohydrate) alone or, as required, for parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is used to feed patients who are unable to eat. It is given as a slow injection (infusion) into a vein. prevent or treat a low level of sugar in the blood (hypoglycaemia, that is causing symptoms, but is not give you extra fluid if your body does not have enough water (you are dehydrated), and you need extra sugar water down/dilute other medicines to be given into Glucose 10% Infusion is a solution of sugar (glucose) in water. Glucose is one of the bodys sources of energy. This solution for infusion provides 400 kilocalories per 1. What Glucose 10% Infusion is and what it is used for 2. What you need to know before you are given 3. How you will be given Glucose 10% Infusion 6. Contents of the pack and other information diabetes that is not adequately treated, allowing your blood sugar levels to rise above normal hyperosmolar coma (unconsciousness). This is a type of coma that can occur if you have diabetes and do thinning of the blood due to the addition of too much when there is too much fluid in the spaces around the cells of the body (extracellular hyperhydration) when there is a larger volume of blood in the blood vessels than there should be (hypervolaemia) a higher level of sugar in the blood than normal a higher level of lactate, a chemical found in the blood, than there should be (hyperlactataemia) severe kidney failure (when your kidneys do not work uncompensated heart failure. This is heart failure that is not adequately treated and causes symptoms Read all of this leaflet carefully before you are given this medicine because it contains important Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, If Continue reading >>

Oral Rehydration Solutions Ors Made At Home - Rehydration Project

Oral Rehydration Solutions Ors Made At Home - Rehydration Project

Facts for Life Diarrhoea ORS Solution: A special drink for diarrhoea A child with diarrhoea should receive oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution and a daily zinc supplement for 1014 days. Diarrhoea medicines are generally ineffective and can be harmful. Made at home: ORS Solution A special drink for diarrhoea Give the child a drink made with 6 level teaspoons of sugar and 1/2 level teaspoon of salt dissolved in 1 litre of clean water. Be very careful to mix the correct amounts. Too much sugar can make the diarrhoea worse. Too much salt can be extremely harmful to the child. Making the mixture a little too diluted (with more than 1 litre of clean water) is not harmful. Diarrhoea usually cures itself in three to four days with rehydration (drinking a lot of liquids). The real danger is the loss of liquid and nutrients from the child's body, which can cause dehydration and malnutrition. A child with diarrhoea should never be given any tablets, antibiotics or other medicines unless prescribed by a trained health worker. The best treatment for diarrhoea is to (1) drink lots of liquids and oral rehydration salts (ORS), properly mixed with clean water from a safe source, and (2) take zinc tablets or syrup for 1014 days. ORS (oral rehydration salts) is a special combination of dry salts that is mixed with safe water. It can help replace the fluids lost due to diarrhoea. When a child has three or more loose stools in a day, begin to give ORS. In addition, for 1014 days, give children over 6 months of age 20 milligrams of zinc per day (tablet or syrup); give children under 6 months of age 10 milligrams per day (tablet or syrup). In most countries, ORS packets are available from health centres, pharmacies, markets and shops. Put the contents of the ORS packet in a clean container Continue reading >>

Numerical: How Will You Make A 0.35 M Glucose Solution? Also, Prepare A 0.12 M Solution Of Glucose From The Above Stock.

Numerical: How Will You Make A 0.35 M Glucose Solution? Also, Prepare A 0.12 M Solution Of Glucose From The Above Stock.

Numerical: How will you make a 0.35 M glucose solution? Also, prepare a 0.12 M solution of glucose from the above stock. Use glucose's molar mass and the target solution's molarity . To make calculations easier, you can always assume your stock solution to have a volume of 1.0 L. Since the molarity of the stock solution must be equal to 0.35 M, the sample must contain 0.35 moles of glucose. #1.0cancel("L") * "0.35 moles"/(1cancel("L")) = "0.35 moles"# Determine how many grams of glucose would contain this many moles by using the compound's molar mass #0.35cancel("moles") * "180.16 g"/(1cancel("mole")) = "63.06 g" = color(green)("63 g")# So, to prepare a 0.35-M, 1.0-L stock solution of glucose you must dissolve 63 g of glucose in enough water to make the total volume equal to one liter. To prepare a 0.12 M solution from the stock solution, you need to determine exactly what volume of the stock solution would contain the same number of moles of glucose as the stock solution. This is where the equation for dilution calculations comes in handy. Continue reading >>

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

How do I make liquid glucose from powdered glucose I recently decided to make something that required liquid glucose, 140g of it. No problem in general, but for some reason none of my usual suppliers had stock (even tried pharmacies). The closest I found was glucose powder. Unfortunately, having no clue how to "re-hydrate" the powder to a liquid form, I experimented. :-) I can safely say that 100g glucose powder was way to much as a substitute for 140g of liquid glucose (which I expected). However, I was wondering if any of you had a convenient method of turning powdered glucose into the wonderfully thick and sticky liquid glucose, in case I ever find myself in that position. Chemically speaking, saying "liquid glucose" is inaccurate. To explain, at normal temperatures, glucose is a solid; depending on the isomer/chiral form , melts at ~150C, and is a liquid above that temperature when not under pressure. ...What you want is a solution (syrup) with water. Glucose also dissolves in nonpolar solvents for other 'liquid' solutions. zanlok Nov 30 '12 at 18:50 Well, the answer is "it depends." This is pretty much the same as asking, "I have sugar, and I want sugar syrup. How much water do I add?" It depends on the concentration you're looking for. If you're looking for a 24% solution, it's 24 grams of glucose in 76 grams of water. A 30% solution is 30 grams of glucose in 70 grams of water, etc, etc. Unless you have some chemical reason to avoid dextrin, you can just substitute corn syrup. The only reason they use glucose in Europe is because they don't have our superabundance of corn. I live in South Africa, and unfortunately corn syrup is not generally available. We base most of our syrups and sugars off sugar cane. brianb Aug 25 '11 at 17:11 Sorry, forgot to ask. What is c Continue reading >>

How To Prepare A Glucose Solution

How To Prepare A Glucose Solution

By Claire Gillespie; Updated April 26, 2018 What you refer to as blood sugar is actually glucose, a simple sugar that comes from the carbohydrates you eat and that converts to an important energy source for the body. In powdered form, glucose is combined with other sugars and added to food to make it sweeter, or used as a nutritional supplement for athletes. It's easy to prepare a glucose solution at home to use for a number of experiments. When a known quantity of glucose is mixed with a known quantity of water, it is known as a standard glucose solution. Scientists use standard glucose solutions to measure the concentration of glucose in an unknown solution. Glucose solutions are also used in a number of research experiments and to measure blood glucose levels in people with diabetes or suspected diabetes. These tests measure whether the body can cope with large amounts of sugar. If the blood sugar recorded in the test is higher than a certain point, the cells in the body may not be absorbing enough sugar, which may be caused by diabetes. Work out the Total Volume and Percentage Glucose Solution To work out how much glucose you need to make a solution of a given percent, multiply (mass/volume) by volume, bearing in mind that 1 g in 100 ml is a 1 percent solution. For this example, if you want to make a total solution of 500 ml of 20 percent glucose, multiply (20/100) by 500. The answer is 100, so you need 100 g of powdered glucose. (If you were making a 10 percent glucose solution, the calculation is (10/100) x 500, and the answer is 50 g). Pour 250 ml of Deionized Water Into a 500 ml Beaker Insert a stir bar and sit the beaker on a hot plate. Turn on the heat and stir functions. Let the water heat up, but don't bring it to boiling point, as this will stop the glucos Continue reading >>

Do's And Don'ts Of Dextrose Administration Vetgirl Veterinary Ce Blog

Do's And Don'ts Of Dextrose Administration Vetgirl Veterinary Ce Blog

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Oral Rehydration Solutions Ors Made At Home - Rehydration Project

Oral Rehydration Solutions Ors Made At Home - Rehydration Project

Facts for Life Diarrhoea ORS Solution: A special drink for diarrhoea A child with diarrhoea should receive oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution and a daily zinc supplement for 1014 days. Diarrhoea medicines are generally ineffective and can be harmful. Made at home: ORS Solution A special drink for diarrhoea Give the child a drink made with 6 level teaspoons of sugar and 1/2 level teaspoon of salt dissolved in 1 litre of clean water. Be very careful to mix the correct amounts. Too much sugar can make the diarrhoea worse. Too much salt can be extremely harmful to the child. Making the mixture a little too diluted (with more than 1 litre of clean water) is not harmful. Diarrhoea usually cures itself in three to four days with rehydration (drinking a lot of liquids). The real danger is the loss of liquid and nutrients from the child's body, which can cause dehydration and malnutrition. A child with diarrhoea should never be given any tablets, antibiotics or other medicines unless prescribed by a trained health worker. The best treatment for diarrhoea is to (1) drink lots of liquids and oral rehydration salts (ORS), properly mixed with clean water from a safe source, and (2) take zinc tablets or syrup for 1014 days. ORS (oral rehydration salts) is a special combination of dry salts that is mixed with safe water. It can help replace the fluids lost due to diarrhoea. When a child has three or more loose stools in a day, begin to give ORS. In addition, for 1014 days, give children over 6 months of age 20 milligrams of zinc per day (tablet or syrup); give children under 6 months of age 10 milligrams per day (tablet or syrup). In most countries, ORS packets are available from health centres, pharmacies, markets and shops. Put the contents of the ORS packet in a clean container Continue reading >>

Infant Feeding: Five Per Cent Glucose Solution

Infant Feeding: Five Per Cent Glucose Solution

Infant feeding: five per cent glucose solution Infant feeding: five per cent glucose solution Five per cent glucose solution is no longer commercially available. This guideline explains how a solution can be made up on the ward by adding dextrose monohydrate (eg Nutrivit glucose powder) to a 90ml bottle of sterile water. Prior to gastrointestinal surgery or investigation, it is often neccessary to give children only clear fluidsfor 24 hours. In this context, any fluid except milk or milk products can be given. It is usual to give older children fruit squash or carbonated drinks. Babies under the age of one are given a 5% glucose solution to maintain their blood sugar level. This procedure should be carried out as an aseptic non-touch technique in a clean area of the ward; the ward treatment room should be used when available ( Rationale 1 ). This procedure should be regarded as the administration of an oral medicine and can be single-checked and carried out by a registered nurse, as per the Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) Administration of Medicines policy. If the solution is prepared by a student nurse or a healthcare assistant, it must be checked by a registered nurse prior to administration. Glucose powder should be stored in a locked medicine cabinet and its expiry date must be checked prior to every solution preparation. ( Rationale 2 ) Check 90ml bottle of sterile water has not been opened. Seal should be intact; reject the bottle if the safety button is raised. ( Rationale 3 ) Ensure the water is within the expiry date. ( Rationale 4 ) Open the bottle of water and add one level yellow scoop of glucose powder - scoop available from ward dietitian. Reseal bottle and shake vigorously for 30 seconds. ( Rationale 5 ) Place a patient identification sticker on bott Continue reading >>

How To Determine The Molarity Of A 10% Glucose Solution - Quora

How To Determine The Molarity Of A 10% Glucose Solution - Quora

How do you determine the molarity of a 10% glucose solution? Answered Aug 25, 2016 Author has 118 answers and 162.1k answer views OK, I am going to go with 10% (w/v) for the 10%. You could make a 10% (w/w), but that would make the maths difficult*. A 10% (w/v) glucose solution would be 10 g of glucose make up to 100 ml (if you are struggling with percentage solutions then check out this blog post: Calculating Percentage Solutions ). As there is 10 g in 100 ml then there will be 100 g in 1 liter. (Remember that molarity is just moles per liter.) The molecular weight of glucose is: 180.1559 g/mol The molarity is therefore: 100 / 180.1559 = 0.555 M If you are struggling with molarity then please have a look at my blog post: Why is memorising the molarity formula a bad idea? in which I go over molarity calculations. * a 10% (w/w) would be 10 g of glucose, dissolved in 90 g of water. The water would take up 90 ml (density of water is 1 g / ml), but I dont know what the final volume would be occupied by the glucose. Hence, I dont know the final volume of the solution, so I cant work out the molarity. Check out Calculating Percentage Solutions for more information on the different types of percentage solutions (w/w, w/v, v/v), and how to do the calculations. 7.5k Views View Upvoters Not for Reproduction Answered Mar 2, 2018 Author has 604 answers and 51.1k answer views You dont have to determine it just use simple calculation. 10% glucose solution is 10g/100ml or 100g/litre 1 mole of glucose is C6H12O6 72+12+96 = 180 488 Views View Upvoters Not for Reproduction David Russell , worked at U.S. Army (2000-2008) Answered Mar 2, 2018 Author has 55 answers and 6.3k answer views Depends on who and how the solution is created, ten parts what ever your medium is, to one part glucose. Continue reading >>

50 Mm Glucose - 2011.igem.org

50 Mm Glucose - 2011.igem.org

Glucose has several forms, and here we are using D-glucose [ [1] ], also known as anhydrous dextrose. It has a stereoisomer called L-glucose - perhaps you have had organic chemistry, in which case the concept of right and left-handed molecules may still be accessible in your brain's long-term memory.BTW, the D-glucose our team used was donated - it had been collecting dust in a colleague's cabinet. D-Glucose is C_6H_{12}O_6, with a molar mass of 180.16 gr/mole. To make 1M d-glucose stock solution one uses 1 liter distilled water180.16 grams anhydrous dextrose Since we did not need an entire liter of the 1M glucose stock, the following recipe sufficed: 50 ml distilled water(50 ml/1000 ml)(180.16 gr) = 9.0 gr anhydrous dextrose A beaker, magnetic stir bar, and magnetic stir plate are handy. No heat is needed for this sugar-water to become a 1M solution, but a little warmth won't hurt. The rapid dissolution of the d-glucose at this concentration makes it unlikely that you'd have it on the plate long enough for it to caramelize. In other words, it's hard to screw up. Using 1M glucose stock to achieve a 50mM final concentration of glucose in 100ml of Solution I Now, we must add some of the 1M glucose stock to make the final concentration 50mM in 100ml of Solution I. How much should we add? Use the formula C1 * V1 = C2 * V2 , where '*' represents the multiplication operator C1 is the stock solution's concentration - (1M for this example), V1 is the unknown quantity that we wish to discover,C2 is the final concentration of glucose in Solution I being prepared - (0.050M in this example), andV2 is the final volume of the solution being prepared - in this case, 100ml. Important Note: The units of measure one selects for volume and concentration must be the same on both sides of Continue reading >>

What Is A Standard Glucose Solution?

What Is A Standard Glucose Solution?

By Robin Wasserman ; Updated August 14, 2017 A standard solution of glucose contains a known quantity of glucose in a known quantity of water. Scientists use standard glucose solutions to measure the concentration of a glucose in an unknown solution. These tests are helpful in many research experiments but also find practical medical application when testing patients for diabetes. Glucose is a 6-carbon sugar molecule, the most common carbohydrate in your body. People often refer to glucose as "blood sugar" as it circulates throughout your blood at a concentration of about 65 to 110 mg/mL. Classified as a monosaccharide, an aldose, a hexose and a reducing sugar, glucose chemically reduces other compounds in oxidation/reduction reactions by readily donating electrons. Glucose is also known as dextrose or D-glucose, due to its dextrorotatory property, the ability of glucose solutions to rotate plane polarized light to the right. Standard solutions in general contain a known amount of substance dissolved in a known quantity of another substance. Usually, a standard glucose solution refers to a 1-percent glucose solution. Preparing a 1-percent standard glucose solution involves dissolving 1 g of glucose in 100 ml of water. Glucose standard solutions are used to create calibration curves against which unknown solutions are measured. These curves then help determine the concentration of the unknown solution. Reactions of glucose with potassium permanganate generate calibration curves. Glucose readily donates electrons to permanganate ions in an oxidation-reduction reaction. The rate of this oxidation-reduction reaction depends on the concentration of glucose in solution. Solutions of permanganate ions have a distinct pinkish-purple color. When this solution is reduced, it bec Continue reading >>

Weight Percent

Weight Percent

Another similar way of expressing the concentration of a solution is to express it in weightpercent (or mass percent, if you prefer). You've done this kind of calculation earlier - last term in the lesson on composition.You may already be prepared to answer the questions in exercise 2 in your workbook. If so, dothat and check your answers at the bottom of the page. If not, read on. As an example, let's consider a 12% by weight sodium chloride solution. Such a solution would have 12 grams of sodium chloride for every 100 grams of solution. To make such a solution, you could weigh out 12 grams of sodium chloride, and then add 88 grams of water, so that the total mass for the solution is 100 grams. Since mass (unlike volume) is conserved, the masses of the components of the solution, the solute and the solvent, will add up to the total mass of the solution. To calculate the mass percent or weight percent of a solution, you must divide the massof the solute by the mass of the solution (both the solute and the solvent together) andthen multiply by 100 to change it into percent. Your workbook has some examples of calculations involving weight percent in example 1.An explanation of those examples is given here. Example 1-a asks, "What is the weight percent of glucose in a solution made by dissolving 4.6 g of glucose in 145.2 g of water?" The way that I recommend you go about doing this is to look at what you need to find, look at what you are given, and determine what the relationship is. Let's start with what you are trying to find, the weight percent of glucose in the solution. What do we need in order to calculate that? We need to divide the weight of glucose by the weight of the solution. We have the weight of glucose, that is 4.6 g. What about the weight of the solution? Continue reading >>

How To Make 500 Ml Of 2% Glucose - Quora

How To Make 500 Ml Of 2% Glucose - Quora

Answered Nov 14, 2018 Author has 324 answers and 74.5k answer views Use 10 grams of glucose, anhydride (no water). Add to a 500 ml volumetric flask and fill to 500 ml. If you can not find anhydride, then calculate the amount of water present (the glucose source should list it, i.e. - 95% glucose), divide 10 grams by this percent and add this to the volumetric flask. If you do not have a volumetric flask, take a beaker or jar and put 500 ml in it (500 g), mark the level. Then start over, add the correct glucose then fill to the line. The degree of accuracy will depend on the narrowness of the vessel near the 500 ml level. Use 10 grams of glucose, anhydride (no water). Add to a 500 ml volumetric flask and fill to 500 ml. If you can not find anhydride, then calculate the amount of water present (the glucose source should list it, i.e. - 95% glucose), divide 10 grams by this percent and add this to the volumetric flask. If you do not have a volumetric flask, take a beaker or jar and put 500 ml in it (500 g), mark the level. Then start over, add the correct glucose then fill to the line. The degree of accuracy will depend on the narrowness of the vessel near the 500 ml level. If you do this by weight you may not have 500 ml of final solution. Percent by weight is much easier. Continue reading >>

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