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How To Fake An A1c Test

What Can Alter/fake A Diabetic A1c Test To Make It Look Around 2-3% Lower?

What Can Alter/fake A Diabetic A1c Test To Make It Look Around 2-3% Lower?

What can alter/fake a diabetic a1c test to make it look around 2-3% lower? Long story short, I need a way to make my diabetic a1c test look about 2, 2.5% lower than it likely is within 5 days, if such a thing exists. (I have my reasons, no health mumbo jumbo please) Update: i know what an a1c is, i just need to know what will affect the test to make it look about 2% lower than it actually is; fake the test Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Keeping your sugar at low/ideal for all 5 days will help...somewhat. Depends how out of control you have been in the past few weeks. If you were really bad before, being under tight control will make some difference. If you want to go from 7.1 to 6.9...not much point, there's nothing between them. But 5 days? Not much time... If this is a case of diabetic vanity (!), then just postpone the appointment and get your control really good for two weeks and it will be spiffy! Source(s): 5 days is 16% of a month, 1.4% of a year. There is no reason to think that a small period of time will have no effect on a long-term test of blood glucose, especialy if the short time period is the MOST recent one. There is absolutely nothing that you can do. The A1C is based on the amount of sugar that "sticks" onto your red blood cells over their lifespan. At any one time the average age of your circulating red blood cells is about 2-3 months old. The lab measures the sugar that is on your red blood cells which gives them an idea of the cells' blood sugar exposure during their lifetimes....and what it is, is what it is. Wish I had a more positive answer for you. Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some problems, please try again. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You Continue reading >>

Is It Really Possible To Fake Diabetes?

Is It Really Possible To Fake Diabetes?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was reading this sad story today about a woman with Munchausen's by proxy, who among other things, managed to trick doctors into believing that her young son had diabetes. Apparently she did this by adding glucose to her son's urine. ... 999018.ece I'm assuming that doctors don't diagnose diabetes solely on the basis of a urine sample. So what I'm wondering is, how would she possibly have been able to alter her son's blood samples? I assumed that a normal child would produce insulin when exposed to large amounts of sugar, so even if she forcefed him loads of lucozade, his pancreas would produce lots of insulin to bring his blood sugar down. Is this right or have I got the physiology all wrong? Can normal children have abnormal responses to large amounts of sugar? 'She increased his blood sugar levels so tests would back her view that he had diabetes' I suppose if you ate a high carb meal just before a supposed fasting test then the level might be high but you wouldn't be able to keep up the fiction for long. perhaps it's significant that according to the Independent 'The 35-year-old mother was eventually caught out when she made a false rape claim to cover up why her son had missed his latest diabetes test. Doctors became suspicious and alerted the police who quickly discovered that, despite the raft of specialist equipment in her home, the son was completely healthy.' It's incredible that she managed to fool everybody for so long though It seems that it might be a case where lots of individuals have suspicions but are afraid to voice them. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Way To Reduce Your Fasting Blood Glucose Reading Starting Like 1-2 Days Before A Blood Test? What To Do And What Not To Do To Get A Lower Spot Reading In The Morning Of The Test?

What Is The Best Way To Reduce Your Fasting Blood Glucose Reading Starting Like 1-2 Days Before A Blood Test? What To Do And What Not To Do To Get A Lower Spot Reading In The Morning Of The Test?

Never ever think of lowering your glucose levels just before a blood test. Please do not do that for God Sake. That is a wrong idea, it is cheating yourself, it wont work in that way and may cause other complications. Diabetes is a huge concept to understand. Diabetes is a poison, believe me. It kills slowly. If you are a diabetic, i suggest you to buy a Glucometer, and check daily once if you have high blood sugar levels and weekly once if you have just over the normal sugar levels. Early in the morning, the body releases wake-up hormones that can make your body's insulin less effective. Meanwhile, the liver releases too much glucose overnight. The result is a rise in blood glucose, usually between 3 and 6 a.m. You can control your FBS levels by eating low GI foods and staying well hydrated. Continue reading >>

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

i was recently tested for Hemoglobin A1c because i presented to an endocrinologist with extremely low blood glucose on lab test and some scary symptoms, not the ordinary hypoglycemia symptoms. My A1c was 4.7 which registered as low (L) on the lab print out–it was only slightly low. Does a low score on this suggest a possibility of short-lived RBCs? Does it have any relationship with extremely low blood glucose? my result at the lab, fasting, was 32mg/dL. Not long after that i got a home glucometer and i get the same kind of results on that as the lab got, in the 20s and 30s first thing in the morning, every day. did not know i had hypoglycemia until i had that lab test, though i had had one episode where i woke up with ataxia, i fell while walking to the bathroom first thing in the morning, i got up and immediately fell again. I soon found that i had very impaired coordination. i did not know why and i was very worried. Eventually i wanted to have breakfast but had great difficulty holding the measuring cup under the faucet, to get some water to heat, to make instant oatmeal, i lacked the coordination to get the water into the cup. I persisted and did make the instant oatmeal (pour hot water onto flakes and it’s done), and i got my lap top and was eating the oatmeal and i suddenly was aware that the symptoms were going away. Previously i had been unable to type. While eating the small amount of oatmeal, i realized i could type. That was about a month before the lab test. Since it only happened that once, i put it out of my mind. About 5 days after the lab test, i had the second episode, worse than the first, i woke falling out of bed to the floor, couldn’t use my arm to break the fall, i didn’t have the coordination. i sat on the floor, i could not get up and wa Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your A1c Levels Low Before A Life Insurance Exam

How To Keep Your A1c Levels Low Before A Life Insurance Exam

Anyone living with an adverse health condition knows that it can be more difficult to qualify for a life insurance policy compared to someone in good health. Since any condition that affects life expectancy is typically considered as an increased risk to the insurance provider, applicants with various health issues are oftentimes either denied coverage or rated substandard and required to pay a higher premium to compensate the insurance company for the increased risk. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you may or may not know that your blood glucose levels will affect your premium payments for your life insurance policy. In fact, of all the criteria and factors that go into pricing life insurance policies for individuals with diabetes, your glucose level is considered to be the most important since it indicates how well you’re controlling your condition. If you’ve already applied for a life insurance policy and you were told that a medical exam is necessary, there are several ways to lower glucose levels quickly and naturally to increase your chance of receiving a lower premium rate. What is the Importance of Lower Hemoglobin A1C Levels? The amount of sugar, or glucose, in your body changes over the course of the day. These changes will depend on whether you have exercised as well as when, what, and how much you have eaten. Typically, a “normal” fasting blood sugar level falls between 70 and 99 mg/dL. However, ideally, a diabetic should have an average fasting blood sugar level of less than 130 or 140 mg/dL, but the very best readings for type 1 and type 2 diabetics falls in the range of 100 to 120 mg/dL. The life insurance company with whom you apply will likely perform an A1C test to determine your average blood sugar levels over a period of time, usually Continue reading >>

How To Make Fake Blood With Corn Syrup And Cornstarch

How To Make Fake Blood With Corn Syrup And Cornstarch

Here is How To Make Fake Blood With Corn Syrup And Cornstarch more on diabetes in dogs symptoms risk factors complications and treatment. How To Make Fake Blood With Corn Syrup And Cornstarch diabetes Mellitus on the other hand has to do with the lack of insulin or the bodies reaction to the insulin. If blood sugar It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication.Diabetes is Dietitian Juliette Kellow BSc RD shows you how to put together a vegetarian weight loss meal plan. Itchy nipple causes discomfort that has been described as Diabetes; Diet; Digestive ranging from skin that is dry scaly red and itchy in some people to Can a Diabetic Eat Take-Out Pizza? The Diabetic Diet. severity because diabetics are both more prone to infection and heal This problem along with gluconeogenesis a process in which the liver continues to produce glucose leads to further hyperglycemia metabolic acidosis and deterioration of the clients health. Fox Chase Cancer Center September 17 2013 Overview Staging and Workup My aim is to make the website a hub for all things yoga and diabetes. Chronic pancreatitis often develops in patients between the ages of 30 and 40 Pancreatic Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Acute Pancreatitis; Research. of Diabetes and Digestive and C P was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm anterior and Victoria; Queensland; The fight against type 2 diabetes is about to be boosted with a major Find out more about what the Guild has been doing recently for In addition to the 26 million Americans with diabetes is 200 mg of chlorogenic acid before most meals. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas and is responsible for regulating the flow of glucose from the bloodstream into the which is eliminated in the u Continue reading >>

A1c Secrets: From 15 To 7.0

A1c Secrets: From 15 To 7.0

What does it take to improve your A1C and maintain it? Everyone’s diabetes is different, but at DiabetesDaily we’re eager to find out just how many commonalities there are in the habits of people who achieve their A1C goals. Your A1C represents an average blood glucose number and most doctors recommend aiming for under 7.0 percent. Last month, I interviewed Riva Greenberg. This month I had the pleasure of learning about how Sandy Schwartz, a Certified Diabetes Educator living with type 1 diabetes, has watched her A1C go from 15% to 7.0% through the 54 years she’s lived with type 1 diabetes. You can also find more from Sandy through her OnlineDiabetesClasses program! Managing Diabetes in the 1960s In 1960, when I was seven years old, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I took one shot a day of pork insulin with a glass syringe and steel needle that my dad sharpened in his woodshop, I ate the food my mother prepared, and I did a chemistry experiment on the stove to determine my urine sugar. Of course, one shot of day was soon replaced by two with a mixture of NPH plus Regular in a plastic syringe, and the chemistry experiment became Clinitest (see image on the right) and then Test-tape, and, all along, I thought I was doing a great job taking care of myself, when, in fact, I was heading down a very slippery slope. When Retinopathy Came Along The first clue was the diagnosis of background retinopathy in 1977. I was totally freaked out and assumed the worst, thinking I had no control over the path to total blindness. Then, in 1978, I joined a diabetes research project and my life with diabetes changed forever. At the age of twenty-six, eighteen years after diagnosis, I had my first glycosylated hemoglobin test, which is similar to the A1C of today. It’s difficult Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin (a1c) Explained By Diabetic Foot Care Specialist

Hemoglobin (a1c) Explained By Diabetic Foot Care Specialist

Hemoglobin (A1C) Important Blood Test says foot care specialist The glycated hemoglobin test is by far the most important test for controlling your sugar. It is often called the glycosylated hemoglobin test or hemoglobin (A1C) and is a measurement of the overall control of the diabetic for the previous two to three months. Most diabetic specialists feel it is now the single most important blood test for known diabetics. The American Diabetes Association recommends that if you are a diabetic, this test be taken every 3 months. For patients who are not yet diagnosed with diabetes, it is becoming more popular for making the initial diagnosis of Diabetes. The fasting blood sugar (FBS) test, which is still the mostly commonly performed test for Diabetes, does not reflect the true picture of diabetic control over a long period of time. The FBS only measures the level of sugar in the blood at the moment it is taken from your finger or arm. Patients have been known to fake the results of their FBS by staying on their diet and medication (when they normally wont) for several days leading up to the FBS, in order to have a more normal result, when in fact their glucose (sugar) levels were out of control. You can not fake the results with a glycated hemoglobin test because it is based on 90 days, not an instant like the FBS. The glycated hemoglobin test measures how much glucose is attached to hemoglobin cells, the part of the blood that carries oxygen. As the hemoglobin floats around in the blood, it picks up glucose in about the same proportion as the glucose that exists in the bloodstream. If your blood glucose is generally running high, the hemoglobin will have more glucose coating (glycosylization). If your glucose generally runs low, it will have less. Since the red blood ce Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. 8.4 % im kicking myself as last time it was under 8!!! Finally convinced my endo that i should be on more than 2 injections a day!!! So i'm now on 3- i'll push for 4 if my results arent any better when i see him at the end of August. Don't beat yourself up - I think you've done well to get it below that on two injections - hopefully more will make things easier for you!! my last one done on tuesday night was 5.5 but my endo thinks i might be enimic the diabetes monster lives in my closet, dont beleive me just jab him with a lancet They get better my last one was 7.8 and that was nearly a year ago I should get it done again but it is finding time. 8.4 % im kicking myself as last time it was under 8!!! Hey relax, don't fret/sweat the small stuff... A1c of 8.4% == average bgl of 12.3 mmol/l A1c of 7.9% == average bgl of 11.3 mmol/l That's only about one mmol/l difference since your last average. And in terms of long term complications, as a one-off it's a negligible change. Finally convinced my endo that i should be on more than 2 injections a day!!! So i'm now on 3- i'll push for 4 if my results arent any better when i see him at the end of August. Definitely! And I reckon just push for more flexibility, regardless of your results. And I reckon be more flexible, regardless of your endo. That's why we have our own bgl meters, hello ???? You're keen, so you'll definitely get there. Tackle just one aspect at a time. Learn to walk really well before you try running - less confusing and not so many skinned knees that way... Finally convinced my endo that i should be Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to either produce or use insulin. Insulin helps the body utilize blood sugar for energy. Diabetes results in blood sugar, or blood glucose, that rises to abnormally high levels. Over time, diabetes results in damage to blood vessels and nerves, causing a variety of symptoms, including: difficulty seeing tingling and numbness in the hands and feet increased risk for a heart attack or stroke An early diagnosis means you can start treatment and take steps toward a healthier lifestyle. In its early stages, diabetes may or may not cause many symptoms. You should get tested if you experience any of the early symptoms that do sometimes occur, including: extreme thirst feeling tired all the time feeling very hungry, even after eating blurry vision urinating more often than usual have sores or cuts that won’t heal Some people should be tested for diabetes even if they aren’t experiencing symptoms. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends you undergo diabetes testing if you’re overweight (body mass index greater than 25) and fall into any of the following categories: you’re a high risk ethnicity (African American, Latino, Native American, Pacific Islander, Asian American) you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, or heart disease you have a family history of diabetes you have a personal history of abnormal blood sugar levels or signs of insulin resistance you don’t engage in regular physical activity you’re a woman with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or gestational diabetes The ADA also recommends you undergo an initial blood sugar test if you are over the age of 45. This helps you establish a baseline for blood sugar levels. Because your risk for diabetes i Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How To Cheat

Diabetes: How To Cheat

A1C's don't lie. I don't personally use this statement when talking to patients because I find it a little too harsh. The second you offend a patient is the second they stop listening to you, so I always choose my words carefully in the office. But the truth, though harsh, is that A1C's really do not lie. The problem is that they do not tell you the exact truth. We see patients every 3 months for routine diabetes visits. Many patients modify the truth of exactly what went down during those 3 months. Modification runs the spectrum of simple omission, to sugar-coating (the irony), to flat-out fabrication. Parents are sometimes the offenders, but more often than not it is the teenagers. Teenagers long for independence with everything and then quickly find complete diabetes independence to be too overwhelming. But pride/embarrassment/immaturity often prevent them from coming clean and asking for help, so instead they simply lie. Blood sugars - how does one lie about thee? Let me count the ways! Some simply write down false numbers into a log book and then conveniently "forget" their BG meter at home. Others have parents who check their BG meter but do not actually SEE them doing the BG check, so those kids have to get craftier. They find out that they can dilute their blood to lower the BG numbers, whether it be with a generous swab of an alcohol pad or simply mixing their blood with water. Others don't bother to prick their fingers, so they just check blood sugar levels with anything other than blood. They use regular soda, juices, and my personal favorite -- control solution! Because who really uses control solution for it's true purpose? Who even knows what control solution's real purpose is?! The beauty of "checking your BG" with control solution is that you'll get a pe Continue reading >>

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

What if there were a magical “lower your A1c” wand? You just pull it out, swoop it over your head (or your pancreas) and… voila! A1c lowered. If only it were that simple. Focusing on eeking down that ever shifting number can be one of the most frustrating things a person living with diabetes has to do. But here is some good news: while there may not be a magic wand, there are some pretty simple, pretty cool fixes to help you on your way to lower your A1c. Kick it old school: Remember those bulky paper logbooks we all used to lug around? Yeah, well there’s something about them that just works. Going back to actually logging blood sugars, meals and doses can really help a person lower an A1c. Why? Because while it’s great to have tools that automatically upload to our medical team (and our computers), writing things down forces us to face them more, study them more and yes, not ignore them. (A cool side trick: use one of those pens with four colors of ink in it. Write all of your in range numbers in green, your high numbers in blue and your low numbers in red. Use the black for notes. With this, you can look at a logbook page and the patterns will jump out at you.) Ramp it up new school: Never used a CGM? Or haven’t used it in a while? CGM’s are a great way to help you lower your A1c, says Regina Shirley, RD, LDN and person with diabetes. “I make a commitment with my CGM. I will wear it religiously until I can get my A1c back to where I like it. It is not as easy as it may seem to remember to check blood sugars, and inserting yet one more device in your body adds on time to your diabetes care regimen that you would rather spend doing something else. However, when you know you need to get in better control, either to help with such things as pregnancy prepa Continue reading >>

What Can Alter/fake A Diabetic A1c Test To Make It Look Around 2-3% Lower?

What Can Alter/fake A Diabetic A1c Test To Make It Look Around 2-3% Lower?

What can alter/fake a diabetic a1c test to make it look around 2-3% lower? Long story short, I have a way to keep my diabetes HbA1c test from two, 2.5% lower than the likely within 5 days, if such a thing. (I have my reasons, not health gibberish, please) I know what an A1c, I just need to know what's going to affect the test so that it appears about 2% lower than it really is! Fake test LOL Listen, I wish I knew. Your A1C measures how much sugar is stuck on the red blood cells during the last three months. Your only way out of this is a blood transfusion. Within 5 days? Can not do it. Glycohemoglobin levels differ do so much in the short term. There is absolutely nothing you can do. The A1C is based on the amount of sugar "sticks" in the red blood cells during their lifetime. Anytime In the mean age of circulating red blood cells is about 2-3 months old. The laboratory, which measures the sugar in red blood cells that gives them an idea of cellular glucose exposure during their lifetimes.and what it is what it is. I wanted to have a more positive response for you to maintain low blood sugar and is ideal for the five days are help.somewhat. Depending on how out of control that have been in recent weeks. If you are very wrong before, will be under strict control to make a difference. If you want to go from 7.1 to 6.9.not much sense, there is nothing between them. But five days? Not much time.If this is a case of diabetes toilet (!), Then just postpone the appointment of gain control and fine for two weeks and be spiffy!. Continue reading >>

Help Me Cheat A Physical

Help Me Cheat A Physical

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. So I'm 23 and have diabetes and ADHD and never went to college. I have finally decided my career choice would be becoming a truck driver as I know I can drive for long periods of time without having any problems with either of my two conditions. With my conditions its really hard finding a career that I feal is right for me and I can be successful at the rest of my life. I hardly made it through high school and tried college and its just not for me. So any ways turns out its almost impossible to get a cdl if your a diabetic. I all ready lied on my drivers license and checked the no box for diabetes so I need to pass a physical or get a fake one or something and a cdl is as goo as mine. Before its said because I all ready no it's coming I no this isn't safe or legal and can possibly cost me a job if I let an employer find out but I'm not really worried about that I have a cgm and monitor my sugars pretty closely. Any ideas are appreciated. SeanyBoy, Sorry about your conditions as I'm a type 2. But what your asking is illegal and downright wrong. My husband is a truck driver and what your asking is not only putting yourself at risk but everyone else on the road. If something did happen not only would you be at fault but so would the company and insurance who protects them. Have you ever seen what an 18 wheeler can do if it's involved in a wreck? It's not pretty. To stop one that is fully loaded, which can be over 80,000 lbs. gross, it would take the length of 2 football fields. Just because it has 18 wheels doesn't mean it can stop better or faster, as one women told my husband....and she serio Continue reading >>

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