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How To Check Diabetes At Home

Diabetes Home Tests Explained

Diabetes Home Tests Explained

What are diabetes home tests? Testing blood glucose (sugar) is an essential part of your diabetes care plan. Depending on your current condition, you may need to visit your doctor several times a year for formal testing. You may also need to go to your doctor for preventive testing, such as cholesterol checks and eye exams. While staying in touch with your doctor is important for staying on top of your treatment plan, you can and should test your blood sugar on your own, as long as your healthcare team advises you to. Self-monitoring your blood glucose may be vital to your treatment. Testing your own levels allows you to learn your blood sugar and manage it no matter the time of day or where you are. Learn how these tests work, and talk to your doctor about the benefits of self-monitoring. Your doctor will help you decide if you need to test your blood sugar at home. If you do, your doctor will work out how often and what times of day you should test. Your doctor will also tell you what your blood sugar targets are. You may consider diabetes home tests if you have: By keeping track of blood glucose, you can discover problems in your current diabetes care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), normal blood glucose ranges between 70 and 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is below 70 mg/dL, and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is well above 140 mg/dL. By maintaining glucose at a normal range, you may help prevent diabetes complications such as: Blood glucose tests come in varying forms, but they all have the same purpose: to tell you what your blood sugar level is at that point in time. Most home tests come with: a lancet (small needle) a lancing, or lancet, device (to hold the needle) test strips a glucose met Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation. When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels. There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal. To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on one thing: Regular monitoring is critical in diabetes care. Why monitor? Self-monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management because it puts you in charge. Regardless of how you manage your diab Continue reading >>

Home Testing Your Cat’s Bg

Home Testing Your Cat’s Bg

Information provided about specific medical procedures or conditions is for educational purposes to allow for educated, on-going discussion with your vet and is not intended to replace veterinary advice. Diabetic Cat Care Buying a glucometer to home test your cat's BG truly is the MOST valuable weapon you have when it comes to fighting the war against FD, and the chance of reversing your cat's diabetes. While it may seem intimidating at first, it is an essential, non-negotiable requirement when it comes to TR. Without testing, you literally are "shooting blind"; meaning you have no idea if your cat even needs insulin or not. If your cat isn't yet on a low carb diet, "shooting blind" is almost guaranteed to be the number one reason behind unfortunate but preventable clinical hypos. By switching to a low carb wet diet following the Detox Process you'll make sure your cat is kept safe from clinical hypo if they've already started insulin. Once the detox process is over, the liver wakes up from being sucker punched by a high carb diet, and immediately the worry of clinical hypo is taken right off the table for otherwise healthy cats. Members on forum can help you understand which form of detox is most appropriate for your cat. Another very common situation when new members arrive at DCC is their cats are on pretty hefty prescribed doses of insulin, sometimes 6 to 7.0 units of insulin (or more) per shot. This tends to occur due to the belief most vets have that insulin lasts at least 12 hours in cats (which it doesn't). Home testing your cat's BG will confirm this to be true more often than not. In addition, the faith the veterinary community at large puts on a Fructosamine blood test is misplaced and is an indication the vet might not have a lot of experience when it comes Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

Being able to test blood glucose levels between routine doctor's or clinic visits is often an important part of managing diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, getting a blood glucose reading is important for working out an insulin dose, for example. For type 2 diabetes, getting a glucose reading is important, for example, in tracking how well managed the condition is and helping to prevent high and low blood sugar levels. Regular testing of your blood sugar can also help reduce the risk of long-term complications from diabetes. Ways to test your blood sugar levels with diabetes Traditional home blood glucose monitoring. The traditional method of testing your blood sugar is to prick your finger with a lancet - a very short, fine needle. You then put a drop of blood on a test strip and place the strip into a special measuring device known as a glucose meter. This then displays your blood sugar level. These meters vary in size, speed and cost. Many provide results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. They can also calculate an average blood glucose level over a period of time. Some also feature software kits that retrieve information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Meters and test strips are available at your local pharmacy. Devices that test other parts of your body. Newer devices allow you to test in areas other than your fingertips, such as your upper arm, forearm, thigh, and the base of your thumb. However, this may result in different blood glucose levels from those obtained from your fingertips. Blood glucose levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other parts of the body. This is especially true when your blood glucose is rapidly changing, such as after a meal or after exerci Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

Kali Nine LLC via Getty Images Dear Savvy Senior, My 62-year-old sister was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and was surprised when the doctor told her that she’s probably had it or prediabetes for many years. My question is what determines prediabetes and how can you know if you have it? —Surprised Senior Dear Surprised, Underlying today’s growing epidemic of type 2 diabetes is a much larger epidemic called prediabetes, which is when the blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The National Institutes of Health estimates that as many as 79 million Americans today have prediabetes. Left untreated, it almost always turns into type 2 diabetes within 10 years. And, if you have prediabetes, the long-term damage it can cause — especially to your heart and circulatory system — may already be starting. But the good news is that prediabetes doesn’t mean that you’re destined for full-blown diabetes. Prediabetes can actually be reversed, and diabetes prevented, by making some simple lifestyle changes like losing weight, exercising, eating a healthy diet and cutting back on carbohydrates. Or, if you need more help, oral medications may also be an option. Get Checked? Because prediabetes typically causes no outward symptoms, most people that have it don’t realize it. The only way to know for sure is to get a blood test. Everyone age 45 years or older should consider getting tested for prediabetes, especially if you are overweight with a body mass index (BMI) above 25. See cdc.gov/bmi to calculate your BMI. If you are younger than 45 but are overweight, or have high blood pressure, a family history of diabetes, or belong to an ethnic group (Latino, Asian, African or Native American) at high risk for diabetes, you too Continue reading >>

Test Yourself For Diabetes

Test Yourself For Diabetes

Diabetes can be deadly if left undiagnosed, so it is very important to pay attention to your body if you are displaying any of the symptoms. Early detection of diabetes can lessen the complications and, if caught in the prediabetic stage, the disease can be reversed. Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes include frequent urination, constant thirst, unexplained weight loss or gain, unusual hunger, or extreme fatigue and irritability. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes include all of the type 1 symptoms, but may also involve frequent infections, blurred vision, slow healing, tingling in the appendages, and being overweight and inactive. If you’re worried you might have diabetes, the most important thing is to see a doctor immediately and receive an official diagnosis. However, there is also a simple blood test you can perform at home that may tell you if you have diabetes. Here are the steps for performing an at-home test for diabetes: Purchase a blood sugar meter at any drug or grocery store. These can be found in Wal-Mart, CVS, Walgreens, Rite-Aid, and most other drug stores. These meters will probably come with free strips. Read the instructions on the package, and practice a few times if there are extra strips. All meters are different, so familiarize yourself with your meter. Test your sugar first thing in the morning before eating anything, and record the result. This will be your “fasting” blood sugar. Eat a carbohydrate-rich meal containing at least 60 grams of carbs. A bagel is good, or a boiled potato or cup of rice. Try to avoid fatty foods. One hour after eating, use the meter to test your blood sugar again, and record the results. Repeat every hour for the next 3 hours. A doctor can provide more accurate results, but the meter will give you a good indication of a proble Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home blood glucose testing is a safe and affordable way to detect diabetes before it becomes a health issue. Diabetes, especially in the early stages, does not always cause symptoms. Almost half of people with the disease don't know they have it. For people already diagnosed with diabetes, a simple diabetes home test is vital in the management of blood sugar levels. It could even be lifesaving. How to test for diabetes at home Home blood glucose monitoring is designed to offer a picture of how the body is processing glucose. A doctor might recommend testing at three different times, and often over the course of several days: Morning fasting reading: This provides information about blood glucose levels before eating or drinking anything. Morning blood glucose readings give a baseline number that offers clues about how the body processes glucose during the day. Before a meal: Blood glucose before a meal tends to be low, so high blood glucose readings suggest difficulties managing blood sugar. After a meal: Post meal testing gives a good idea about how your body reacts to food, and if sugar is able to efficiently get into the cells for use. Blood glucose readings after a meal can help diagnose gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy. Most doctors recommend testing about 2 hours after a meal. For the most accurate testing, people should log the food they eat, and notice trends in their blood glucose readings. Whether you consume a high or low carbohydrate meal, if your blood sugar reading is higher than normal afterwards, this suggests the body is having difficulty managing meals and lowering blood glucose. After consulting a doctor about the right testing schedule and frequency, people should take the following steps: Read the manual for the blood glucose moni Continue reading >>

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Testing blood sugar at home can be an effective way to treat and monitor your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the top 10 causes of death in North America. About 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes – 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Suspecting that you or a loved one might have diabetes can be scary. It is a condition that causes sweeping changes to a person’s lifestyle. In most cases, because the early signs of diabetes are not known, being diagnosed comes as a shock. However, there are affordable tests that can be done at home to help diagnose diabetes in its early stages. But before you embark on home testing, it’s important to recognize the symptoms that can help you determine if home testing is necessary. Major symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Excessive hunger Fatigue Blurry vision Sores and cuts that won’t heal What are diabetic home tests? Although going in to see your doctor will give you accurate blood sugar readings, it can be a hassle making an appointment, waiting to see your doctor and traveling to and from the office. Instead you can do at home testing, which can help you better monitor and control your diabetes. There are different types of at-home tests you can complete daily to properly monitor your blood sugar levels. You can do a blood test, urine test or use an A1C kit. Those who would benefit from diabetic home testing are those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and individuals who are showing signs of diabetes. By keeping track of blood sugar levels you can gauge how your current treatment and lifestyle habits are affecting your condition. A normal blood sugar reading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is between 70 and 140 mg/dL. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test For Diabetes

Hba1c Test For Diabetes

Tweet The HbA1c test, also known as the haemoglobin A1c or glycated haemoglobin test, is an important blood test that gives a good indication of how well your diabetes is being controlled. Together with the fasting plasma glucose test, the HbA1c test is one of the main ways in which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. HbA1c tests are not the primary diagnostic test for type 1 diabetes but may sometimes be used together with other tests. For HbA1c guidelines for monitoring diabetes control, see our HbA1c targets page. HbA1c testing in diagnosing diabetes The World Health Organisation (WHO) suggests the following diagnostic guidelines for diabetes: HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6.0%): Non-diabetic HbA1c between 42 and 47 mmol/mol (6.0–6.4%): Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) or Prediabetes HbA1c of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) or over: Type 2 diabetes If your HbA1c test returns a reading of 6.0–6.4%, that indicates prediabetes. Your doctor should work with you to suggest appropriate lifestyle changes that could reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. HbA1c is not used to diagnose gestational diabetes in the UK. Instead, an oral glucose tolerance test is used. A random blood glucose test will usually be used to diagnose type 1 diabetes. However, in some cases, an HbA1c test may be used to support a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. People with diabetes who reduced their HbA1c by less than 1% can cut their risk of dying within 5 years by 50%, according to Swedish research presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Sept. 2012 (EASD). How is HbA1c tested? To measure a person's HbA1c level, a blood sample is taken from the patient's arm, and used to produce a reading. In some cases, such as with HbA1c testing for children, a single droplet of blo Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

To check your blood sugar level, gather your blood glucose meter, a test strip and your lancing device. Watch the video below or follow the steps outlined here. See how to prepare the meter and test strip, lance your finger and get a reading using the Accu-Chek® Aviva Plus system. The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your hands—using warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spot—don't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Discard the used lancet properly. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Value Of Home Blood Sugar Monitoring Unclear

Type 2 Diabetes: Value Of Home Blood Sugar Monitoring Unclear

Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a central tenet of diabetes treatment: monitor the blood sugar closely, then adjust your diet, exercise, and medications to keep it in a good range. And that makes sense. Poorly controlled blood sugar is a major risk factor for diabetic complications, including kidney disease, vision loss, and nerve damage. While efforts to carefully monitor and control the blood sugar in diabetes are worthwhile, “tight control” is not always helpful — and it may even cause harm. For example, in studies of people with longstanding type 2 diabetes, the type that usually begins in adulthood and is highly linked with obesity, those with the tightest control either had no benefit or had higher rates of cardiovascular disease and death. Meanwhile, studies of people with type 1 diabetes — the type that tends to start during childhood due to an immune attack against the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas — suggest that tight control may help protect against cardiovascular disease. So, it seems the benefits and risks of tight control depend on the situation. Home blood sugar monitoring for type 2 diabetes People with diabetes are often advised to check their blood sugar levels at home by pricking a finger and testing the blood with a glucose meter. They can review the results with their doctors over the phone, online, or at the next office appointment. The value of this for people with type 2 diabetes is uncertain. In a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers enrolled 450 people with Type 2 diabetes, none of whom were taking insulin. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: no self-monitoring of blood sugar once daily self-monitoring of blood sugar once-daily self-monitoring of blood sugar with “enhanced feedba Continue reading >>

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

More than 15,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 every year. Make sure you know the telltale signs -- they're all too easy to dismiss. When Chloe Powell started begging for one more drink of water every night, her father, Charles, thought his then 7-year-old was using a common bedtime stall tactic. "I was irritated that she wouldn't go to sleep," admits Dr. Powell, who's a family physician in Dallas. With all she was drinking, he wasn't surprised when she began wetting the bed. But when Chloe couldn't make it through a conversation without having to use the bathroom, he became concerned. "I figured she had a urinary-tract infection, and she'd take some antibiotics and feel better," says Dr. Powell. He wasn't at all prepared for what his daughter's urine test showed: a dangerously high level of sugar that was a clear indicator of type 1 diabetes. In an instant, Chloe, now 10, went from being a kid who never thought twice about the foods she ate or the energy she burned to one who'd face a lifetime of carbohydrate counting, finger pricks, and insulin injections. A Disease on the Rise Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly destroy healthy cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin. (Type 2, on the other hand, occurs when the body doesn't respond to the insulin that's being made.) Insulin ensures that sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream gets into the body's cells where it's needed for energy; without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, which can be deadly. It's important to begin insulin therapy as soon as possible because high blood-sugar levels can cause permanent vision and nerve problems as well as damage to blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Since the 198 Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

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