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How To Cheat A Glucose Test

The Ultimate Guide To Biohacking Your Blood Sugar Levels (and Why Sugar Sometimes Isn’t Bad).

The Ultimate Guide To Biohacking Your Blood Sugar Levels (and Why Sugar Sometimes Isn’t Bad).

If you enjoy the post you’re about to read, you may want to check out the free Diabetes Summit from April 18-25, 2016, in which 30+ experts (including me) share the best tips, strategies and secrets for controlling and reversing blood sugar issues, type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome… In one of my Quick & Dirty Tips articles last week, I mentioned that one “hack” I use to avoid experiencing big spikes in blood sugar from a big meal is to do some basic strength training with a dumbbell prior to eating that meal, which, as I explain in that article, activates specific sugar transporters responsible for taking up carbohydrate into muscle tissue, rather than partitioning those sugars into storage fat. Since my own personal genetic testing has revealed that I have a higher than normal risk for Type 2 diabetes (there are specific genetic variations associated with diabetes that you can check out here), hacking blood sugar levels to get them lower is a topic near and dear to my heart. This should also be a very important topic for you to educate yourself on, since not only are there are specific genetic variations associated with diabetes that you can check out here), hacking blood sugar levels to get them lower is a topic near and dear to my heart. This should also be a very important topic for you to educate yourself on, since not only are Type 2 diabetes rates rising, both in the United States and globally (even among athletes and so-called “healthy” people), but so are a host of other chronic disease, neural degradation and weight issues directly related to high blood sugar. Characterized by insulin resistance and chronic high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia), type 2 diabetes can lead to both brain and metabolic dysfunction, and is also a sig Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your A1c Levels Low Before A Life Insurance Exam

How To Keep Your A1c Levels Low Before A Life Insurance Exam

Anyone living with an adverse health condition knows that it can be more difficult to qualify for a life insurance policy compared to someone in good health. Since any condition that affects life expectancy is typically considered as an increased risk to the insurance provider, applicants with various health issues are oftentimes either denied coverage or rated substandard and required to pay a higher premium to compensate the insurance company for the increased risk. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you may or may not know that your blood glucose levels will affect your premium payments for your life insurance policy. In fact, of all the criteria and factors that go into pricing life insurance policies for individuals with diabetes, your glucose level is considered to be the most important since it indicates how well you’re controlling your condition. If you’ve already applied for a life insurance policy and you were told that a medical exam is necessary, there are several ways to lower glucose levels quickly and naturally to increase your chance of receiving a lower premium rate. What is the Importance of Lower Hemoglobin A1C Levels? The amount of sugar, or glucose, in your body changes over the course of the day. These changes will depend on whether you have exercised as well as when, what, and how much you have eaten. Typically, a “normal” fasting blood sugar level falls between 70 and 99 mg/dL. However, ideally, a diabetic should have an average fasting blood sugar level of less than 130 or 140 mg/dL, but the very best readings for type 1 and type 2 diabetics falls in the range of 100 to 120 mg/dL. The life insurance company with whom you apply will likely perform an A1C test to determine your average blood sugar levels over a period of time, usually Continue reading >>

Wired To Eat: Neuroregulation Of Appetite With Robb Wolf

Wired To Eat: Neuroregulation Of Appetite With Robb Wolf

Episode Guest Robb Wolf Best Selling Author, Health Expert, Podcast Host, Former Research Biochemist, Entrepreneur, Husband/Father Episode Resources and Links Pre-order Wired to Eat before March 21 and receive some awesome bonuses including a bonus chapter, an interview discussing the ins and outs of what to look for in your blood work and how to interpret your results, and a $20 gift card to Thrive Market. Go here to learn more about how to claim your bonuses. Personalized Nutrition by Prediction of Glycemic Responses – study using post-meal glucose monitoring for short-term personalized dietary interventions for an 800-person cohort In This Episode Is it possible to have a nutrition plan that is customized *exactly* for your own individual needs? Best selling author and former research biochemist Robb Wolf joins us to talk about the failings of one-size-fits-all diets, the neuroregulation of appetite, and much more. TOPICS: 15:50 – Confirmation bias of self transformation stories & individual variation of insulin resistance 17:30 – The Wired To Eat template for tackling nutrition & health 20:00 – When nutrition and health guidelines turn into religious doctrine 22:20 – Controversy over the “cheat meal” or “cheat day” with long term progress 24:00 – The biological impact of cheat meals from a holistic point of view 26:40 – Supernormal stimuli: drugs, porn, and the planned cheat meal 29:45 – Abstainers vs moderators – alcoholism & food addiction 31:30 – Could excluding certain foods lead to neuroticism and disordered eating? 33:00 – Accidentally bypassing your neuroregulation of appetite? How to eat more – like a true Man vs Food champion 37:40 – Personalized Nutrition: What can we learn from continuous or periodic blood glucose monitor Continue reading >>

7 Things To Know About Fasting Blood Sugar Test

7 Things To Know About Fasting Blood Sugar Test

1. For a fasting blood sugar test normally you will need to fast for eight hours. Make sure to verify the specific fasting time though, because in some cases additional testing may require a fast of up to sixteen hours. Usually the physician or lab will specify the fasting time, and if you are not sure call and ask. 2. A blood sugar level chart can help track blood sugar levels both after fasting and after eating, and may be very helpful to your physician. Notations on foods eaten will show how these foods affect your blood sugar levels, and can help your doctor determine the best treatment for you. 3. Always fast for at least the minimum amount of time specified for the fasting blood sugar test you are having done. If you cheat and have a morning snack this can cause your levels to go up higher, and may cause your physician to diagnose you with diabetes when you do not have this disease. 4. Knowing your normal blood sugar levels is important, and you should also be aware of the high blood sugar symptoms. This will allow you to get help if any medical complications occur. A glucose tolerance test may be done as well as the sugar level test, to evaluate how well your body handles glucose. 5. You can have water before a fasting blood sugar test, as long as it is plain water without any flavor or sugar added. In fact you are encouraged to drink water, because it is harder to draw blood if you become dehydrated. 6. One of the consequences of blood sugar too high is full blown diabetes, and possibly insulin shots to control this condition. If your fasting level is 125 mg/dL or above you are considered diabetic. 7. Normal results for a fasting blood sugar test should be less than 100mg/dL. If the results are higher than this it can be an indication that there is a problem whi Continue reading >>

Carb Loading Prior To Glucose Tolerance Test? May 6, 2006 9:46 Pm Subscribe

Carb Loading Prior To Glucose Tolerance Test? May 6, 2006 9:46 Pm Subscribe

Added note: Yes "why don't you ask your midwife" is an appropriate answer to this question, but I already have. The answer she gave me ("because it will improve the accuracy of the test") wasn't quite satisfactory enough. I figured I'd just be able to google it on my own (I expect her to know a lot about childbirth, not as much about blood chemestry) but have come up blank. I'd actually want to stay away from that. Go eat your regular diet -- for sure. BUT, for goodness sakes -- I can't see why you'd want to stack up on carbs. You're glucose challenge test will be just that: "a challenge" of sugar to your body. If your body can handle that pretty significant challenge just fine then you won't go to the next aspects of the test -- as I've cited and quoted below...... Given that's its only a couple days, the midwive's advice is probably benign. But, I'm curious as to her rationale for it. The test is designed to see how you do fasting and not-fasting. While I can't understand why you'd consciously prime it (and risk bombarding your insulin receptors more than usual) -- it does seem that carbs over 150g = carbo loading (as my cite declares). So, perhaps that's what the midwife was getting at then. Here's what the protocoal is going to be: Just as a note (OGTT = oral glucose tolerance test). Good luck to you and your baby! OK -- here's something pretty close to what you can expect from emedicine: Screening for gestational diabetes GDM only occurs during pregnancy. The diagnosis is established by glucose tolerance testing. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include advanced maternal age, ethnicity, obesity, obstetrical history of diabetes or macrosomia, and strong family history of diabetes. The best method for diagnosing GDM continues to be controversial. The 2-step syst Continue reading >>

Your Ultimate Cheat Sheet To Understanding Blood Sugar

Your Ultimate Cheat Sheet To Understanding Blood Sugar

We’re back this week on the blog with more resources to educate and decode how to best manage (and digest) all of the health information flying around out there. If you’re currently rocking an activity tracker (such as a Fitbit or a Jawbone UP band) you’re not alone – one in 10 Americans use devices like these (known as wearables) to track their day-to-day activity and help quantify their efforts to stay active, healthy, and/or fit. You’ll no doubt see the rise in this “one in 10” number over the next few years, but it won’t be limited to step counters and run trackers. Consumers can look forward to an explosion of sensors that will monitor important body information, such as breathing and heart rate. An advantage of personal trackers is that they are easy to use, and give real time updates on your habits and data – with this information, you have the opportunity to take action and improve or decrease health risks. As such, there is one biomarker that is seen as the “Holy Grail” with regards to the next breakthrough in wearable monitoring: Blood Sugar aka glucose. According to a recent Forbes piece, big players like Apple are rumored to be the closest to this breakthrough. Why glucose? Because with glucose monitoring, we could gain insights beyond activity, and dive into what someone has actually eaten. This is a crucial data point because diet has been regarded as having a far greater impact on health than activity. Your cheat sheet on glucose is below. Are there others you’d like us to cover? Leave suggestions in the comments! Glucose is a type of sugar that circulates in your blood. (This is just one type. The blood also contains another sugar, called fructose) It provides your body’s cells with the energy they need. Often when you eat there Continue reading >>

Prediabetes For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Prediabetes For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Prediabetes affects approximately 60 million people in the United States alone. Left untreated, the condition can lead to diabetes and serious long-term health problems. Prediabetes can be stopped and even reversed through changes in diet and exercise. Get healthy by figuring out whether you’re at risk for prediabetes; knowing what blood glucose levels identify prediabetes and diabetes; having other medical tests done to monitor your health; and improving your eating habits. Getting Screened for Prediabetes The American Diabetes Association recommends that physicians screen their patients for prediabetes starting at age 45. As long as a screening is normal, you should repeat it at three-year intervals. Screening is especially important for people who answer yes to these questions: Do you have a relative with type 2 diabetes or heart disease? Are you overweight or obese? Do you have high blood pressure? Do you have a sedentary lifestyle? Do you have high levels of triglycerides and/or low levels of HDL cholesterol, both being types of fats measured in a blood test? Do you belong to a higher-risk ethnic group such as African American, Latino, Asian American, or Pacific Islander? Do you have “apple-shaped” rather than “pear-shaped” weight distribution? This means your excess weight is around your stomach rather than your hips. For women who have had children, did you develop diabetes during the pregnancy or have a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds at birth? For women, is there a history of polycystic ovarian syndrome, a condition that may include lack of periods, infertility, and increased hair on the body? Blood Test Results That Identify Prediabetes Prediabetes is a silent condition: You likely will not experience any symptoms from it. But allowing prediabete Continue reading >>

Why Won’t We Tell Diabetics The Truth?

Why Won’t We Tell Diabetics The Truth?

I’m appalled constantly at the misinformation we nutrition experts are telling folks with diabetes. It’s all over the place. The “everything in moderation” mantra, and how we need to eat less meat, less fat, and more whole grains, is a pervasive theme drilled into young dietitians, and spread to the public through our dietary guidelines. This information is making people sick. Last week, the following ad popped up in my Facebook newsfeed several times for “10 Foods That Are Great For Diabetics“. (This click bait article is also making the rounds on several other sites.) Here are the foods: dates, berries, garlic, flax seeds, apples, broccoli, oats, melons, kale and barley. Now, I don’t think that kale is BAD, but this list is like telling alcoholics to drink a little more orange juice or sprinkle some chia seeds into their martini and omitting the fact that they need to stop drinking booze. In our quest to avoid the truth and focus on individual super foods that will save us, this post is telling diabetics that dates are so amazing because 7 of them provide 4g of fiber. They forgot to mention that 7 dates equals 126g of carbs with no fat, so that’s pretty much like a syringe of sugar shot directly into your blood if eaten on an empty stomach. None of these top 10 lists had protein, and the only fat was flax seeds (for their omega-3’s) but what about fatty fish or fish oil, which is much more bioavailable? Why aren’t we instead telling them to avoid excess carbohydrates, because the last time I checked, you can actually reduce blood sugar by… not eating sugar! I’ve been on a protein and meat vindication kick lately, looking into how much protein we need, how much we’re eating, and what the best sources are. For this post, I decided to switch gea Continue reading >>

6 Easy Cheats To Lower Your Glucose

6 Easy Cheats To Lower Your Glucose

Diabetes is a leading cause of illness and disability in the U.S. Much of the food we eat is saturated with sugar that may be hidden from plain sight. Check out these cheats to lower your blood glucose and stave off diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How To Cheat

Diabetes: How To Cheat

A1C's don't lie. I don't personally use this statement when talking to patients because I find it a little too harsh. The second you offend a patient is the second they stop listening to you, so I always choose my words carefully in the office. But the truth, though harsh, is that A1C's really do not lie. The problem is that they do not tell you the exact truth. We see patients every 3 months for routine diabetes visits. Many patients modify the truth of exactly what went down during those 3 months. Modification runs the spectrum of simple omission, to sugar-coating (the irony), to flat-out fabrication. Parents are sometimes the offenders, but more often than not it is the teenagers. Teenagers long for independence with everything and then quickly find complete diabetes independence to be too overwhelming. But pride/embarrassment/immaturity often prevent them from coming clean and asking for help, so instead they simply lie. Blood sugars - how does one lie about thee? Let me count the ways! Some simply write down false numbers into a log book and then conveniently "forget" their BG meter at home. Others have parents who check their BG meter but do not actually SEE them doing the BG check, so those kids have to get craftier. They find out that they can dilute their blood to lower the BG numbers, whether it be with a generous swab of an alcohol pad or simply mixing their blood with water. Others don't bother to prick their fingers, so they just check blood sugar levels with anything other than blood. They use regular soda, juices, and my personal favorite -- control solution! Because who really uses control solution for it's true purpose? Who even knows what control solution's real purpose is?! The beauty of "checking your BG" with control solution is that you'll get a pe Continue reading >>

Why My Grandmother Used To Cheat At Her Check-ups!

Why My Grandmother Used To Cheat At Her Check-ups!

Have you ever taken your grandmother for a medical check-up? Do you remember how it was? I remember my grandmother! When she was already quite old she developed diabetes. As a result she had to do a blood sugar test once a month. These blood sugar tests were big events. A few days before the test, my grandmother usually stopped eating anything containing sugar and went easy on all kinds of carbs and fat. She did this to bring the sugar count in her blood down to a normal rate – for the test! Right after the test she rewarded herself with a special treat like a cake or an ice cream-fruit-combo-cup. Nowadays this wouldn’t work! First, there are portable little machines where people can measure their blood sugar at home. This gives freedom and responsibility into the patient’s hands. Second, the method that is used to test the blood sugar in a clinic has changed. Now one test shows how the blood sugar was for the last 3 months. The test is called HbA1-test. Take care of your body and stay as healthy as you can! Hb stands for Hemoglobin, the protein that makes the blood red and that we all love so much. It contains iron and transports oxygen. All of it is essential for our good health. A1 stands for alpha 1 and is a part of this special kind of hemoglobin, HbA1. This kind of hemoglobin, that contains alpha 1, makes up 97% of our total hemoglobin. There are other kinds of hemoglobin but they are not of interest to our test. Happening in the blood: Sugar loves Hemoglobin! The sugar in our blood is now binding to the Hemoglobin (glycation). They are now kind of holding hands and being a package, an Hb-sugar-package. Logically, as more sugar there is in the blood as more packages we find. That is what the new tests measure, the amount of Hb-sugar-packages. Why do we avoid Continue reading >>

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

Don’t Eat The Cucumber And Other Helpful Tips For The Gestational Diabetes Tests

This is not my first rodeo. Three pregnancies in four years and you’d think I could walk through the pre-natal care routine backwards with my eyes closed, but no. No, I made some rookie mistakes last week and I want to share them so that a) you don’t do the same thing b) I remember for the next time, if there is one. Just writing the words “next time” right now makes me want to curl up in the fetal position and find a corner to rock in. But I digress. The one-hour gestational diabetes glucose test: It has a reputation that precedes it, and any formerly pregnant woman anywhere will strike up conversation about that blessed orange drink. First of all, the drink for this test is not as bad as lore makes it out to be. (Isn’t that true of so many things in pregnancy and birth? Hype does not equal reality.) I remember being pleasantly surprised during my first pregnancy to discover that it is carbonated and pretty much tastes like Orange Crush soda. Even for a non-pop drinker, I don’t think it is as much of a shock to the system as we preggos like to yack about. For those who don’t know, you drink the soda, wait for an hour, and then they draw a vile of blood and test your blood sugar level. If it is lower than 140, you pass. Higher, you fail. The one-hour test has no official dietary guidelines except eating nothing between the glucose drink and your blood draw. Most practices and online pregnancy forums will tell you to watch your sugar and carb intake the day of the test, and to stick to a lot of protein. My appointment for the one-hour test was Monday at 2:40 (rookie mistake number one). I had eggs for breakfast, a no-tortilla Chipotle burrito bowl for lunch, and cucumber slices for an afternoon snack before leaving for my midwife’s office (rookie mistake Continue reading >>

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

How To Pass Your Three-hour Glucose Test

So you “failed” your one-hour glucose test, and now you have to do the dreaded three-hour test? Yeah, me, too. I have had to do the three-hour test with two of my pregnancies, and it stinks! How to pass the test. Oh man, I have asked myself this so many times, but the truth is, there is no way to really make it so that you “pass,” unless you really don't have gestational diabetes. Sure, you will find tips around the Internet about what you could do that might help, but in all honesty, trying to do something to get a false “passing” reading on this test is dangerous to your health and the health of your little baby, too! It is important for the test results to be accurate so that if there really is a medical issue, your doctor will know what to do and can treat you properly and watch for the safety of both of you. What you should do. Do exactly what your doctor tells you to do before this test; some of them want you to load up on carbs for a few days before the test, others want you to avoid sugar, and almost all of them will want you to be fasting from midnight until the time of the test in order to make sure that your body is clear of everything. What to expect. At the very least, you should expect to get to your doctor's office with your tummy growling, only to be given another bottle of that yummy glucose syrup (seriously, it's sugar — can't they make it taste better?), which you will drink right after you have your first blood draw. You guzzle down the bottle of glucose and wait a whole hour without any food or drink, get another blood draw, and repeat that same process for three full hours. Some offices have a room for you to go into and sit. It is important that you not overexert yourself between blood draws because it can change the way that your bo Continue reading >>

3 Secret Ways To Pass The Glucose Test Your Doctor May Not Tell You About

3 Secret Ways To Pass The Glucose Test Your Doctor May Not Tell You About

One in 10 women will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes during her pregnancy – that's a big percent of all moms by any means. But a whole lot more will get a positive result on their glucose tolerance tests – one in two, by some estimates. This test is important, as it's often the first sign that a mom has a condition that needs extra-special care and attention throughout the rest of her pregnancy. But why the huge discrepancy between the test result and number of women who actually have the condition? Often, women test positive simply because of what they ate in the hours before the test. This happened to me with my first baby (when I was actually diagnosed with borderline GD very late in the pregnancy). So, I did a lot of research before my test with Baby #2 and discovered the following "secret ways" to beat the sugar test with flying colors -- things your doctor may not tell you. The second time around all the tests came back completely normal, and I was complication-free. 1. Avoid high-sugar foods shortly before the test and cut back on simple, or refined, carbs. I was completely clueless when it came to all this my first time around. I didn't know that eating a moderately sugary cereal for breakfast the morning of the glucose screening test -- which involves downing a sugar-laden drink in a matter of minutes and then getting blood drawn an hour later -- could yield a positive result and force a poor pregnant mom to go back for a longer, more brutal 3-hour version (called the glucose tolerance test). But that's exactly what happened to me. I proceeded to take the 3-hour torturous test a week later. Luckily, it came back negative... that time. Little did I know that was only the beginning. 2. Chow down on healthy carbohydrates and make sure you eat a good bal Continue reading >>

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

A fasting blood sugar level is usually ordered by a physician either to check for a new diagnosis of diabetes or to monitor a person who is known to have diabetes. Ideally fasting blood sugar is tested shortly after you get up in the morning, 8 to 12 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water. The normal range is from 70 to 99 mg/dL. Levels above 100 mg/dL may indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Various factors can affect fasting blood sugar levels. Any foods eaten within 8 hours of the test may cause glucose levels to be elevated. After food is digested, higher levels of glucose remain in the blood for some time. Alcoholic beverages consumed even the night before the test may cause a drop in blood sugar. Medications such as corticosteroids, estrogen -- present in birth control pills, some diuretics, certain antidepressants, anti-seizure medication and even plain aspirin can increase glucose levels. Glucose levels can be decreased by medications that include insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, anabolic steroids and even acetaminophen. Exercise can cause an increase or a decrease in blood sugar levels. During exercise, insulin becomes more efficient. This effect can persist, lowering blood sugar levels for hours afterward. An hour of afternoon exercise may lower glucose levels until the next morning, affecting the fasting blood sugar test. Exercise can also affect glucose levels by releasing adrenaline. This raises blood sugar temporarily. Physical exertion or other activities that cause excitement may increase fasting sugar levels if performed shortly before the test. Many medical conditions can affect blood sugar levels, such as liver disease, disorders of the pancreas and disorders of the thyroid gland. Acute and severe trauma -- such as major surgery, Continue reading >>

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