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How Soon Can You Test For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that is first seen in a pregnant woman who did not have diabetes before she was pregnant. Some women have more than one pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually shows up in the middle of pregnancy. Doctors most often test for it between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Often gestational diabetes can be controlled through eating healthy foods and regular exercise. Sometimes a woman with gestational diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a woman with gestational diabetes can lead to problems for the pregnant woman and the baby: An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C-Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is an operation to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both Continue reading >>

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

The healthcare team will usually stop any diabetes-related medication as soon as you have given birth. However, you or your baby will receive extra monitoring, and perhaps extra care, as a result of the gestational diabetes. Your baby after the birth Gestational diabetes can directly affect your baby’s blood glucose levels. That means that he could be born with low blood glucose. This could lead to serious consequences if it is not treated, but your team will be aware of these risks and will know what to do. He may also have jaundice (which is usually harmless if treated) and may also have increased risk of breathing difficulties. You will be encouraged to feed your baby within half an hour after birth and then every two-to-three hours until his blood glucose levels stabilise. Two-to-four hours after the birth, the healthcare team will test his blood glucose level. They will do this by pricking his heel to get a drop of blood for testing. Your baby will not enjoy this, but try not to let it upset you. The test is done to keep your baby safe. If your baby’s blood glucose remains low, he might need some extra help to increase his blood glucose levels, such as being put on a drip or being tube fed. He may need to spend some time being monitored or treated in the neonatal unit – especially if there are extra complications. However the hospital will try to keep him in the ward with you wherever this is possible. "I was an emotional wreck afterwards for a whole week, crying all the time. I didn't like seeing my baby with tubes in him and he had jaundice as well so we weren't allowed to go home. But now, he's fabulous; constantly crawling around, he's a really busy baby!" Aisha, mum of one You after the birth Your blood glucose should be tested before you leave the hospi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to properly use sugar (glucose) as a source of fuel. As a result, the levels of sugar in the blood become abnormally high. When this condition occurs during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Impact Gestational diabetes affects about 2–10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually begins in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy and goes away after the baby is born. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, obesity, high blood pressure, increasing age and a close relative with diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Ramifications Gestational diabetes can result in complications for mother and baby. Women with gestational diabetes are more likely to get high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia. They have an increased chance of needing a Cesarean delivery. Babies of women who have gestational diabetes are more likely to develop jaundice. They also may grow too large, leading to an increased risk of birth trauma. Complications can be avoided by controlling gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can usually be well controlled through a combination of close monitoring, diet, exercise and occasionally the administration of medication. You will be instructed to go to the lab at your convenience or call to schedule time. The lab will provide the glucose solutions to drink and you will need to remain in the clinic for the duration of the test (about one hour). Gestational Diabetes Screening Test Testing for gestational diabetes is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for gestational diabetes, you may be tested earlier. For accurate results, it is very important that you follow these instructions exactly. You do not need Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

A new study shows that babies are already showing the effects of gestational diabetes by the time expectant moms are tested for it. So are we testing too late? No one likes the glucose tolerance test—having to chug down that nasty orange drink, and hoping there are no side effects. Unfortunately, screening for high blood sugar is a necessity in pregnancy, as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can cause problems ranging from stillbirth to childhood obesity. But a new study published in journal Diabetes Care suggests that unborn babies are showing the effects of GDM before expectant mothers are even tested for it, throwing the screening's relevance into question. Should pregnant women be tested even earlier? Diagnosis after baby is already affected Researchers looked at data from over 4,000 pregnant women to measure baby's growth, as large size is an indicator of gestational diabetes, and compared that info to the 171 moms who actually developed GDM later on. They also looked at which women were obese, another risk factor for GDM. "Gestational diabetes and obesity were both associated with accelerated growth of the [baby's] abdomen between 20 and 28 weeks," study author Gordon Smith, M.D., Ph.D., the head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Cambridge in the UK, tells Fit Pregnancy. "In relation to gestational diabetes, measurements were normal at 20 weeks, but were large by 28 weeks. Women who were both obese and had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes were almost five times more likely to have a baby with a large abdominal measurement at 28 weeks." Because GDM wasn't actually diagnosed in the women until 28 weeks, "the effects of gestational diabetes [are] already present at the time we normally make the diagnosis," Dr. Smith says. Alth Continue reading >>

How Early Can Gestational Diabetes Start?

How Early Can Gestational Diabetes Start?

How early can gestational diabetes start? My mother is diabetic and my sister had gestational diabetes during her pregnancy. I'm worried I might be prone too. I'm FTM19weeks5days. Doctor mentioned the glucose tests would be done in my 27th week. I was wondering if we could perform tests at home to monitor the sugar levels and be more cautious. If so, when is the best time to start testing at home? I'm worried about GD as well. My MIL had it with both her children, so I'm concerned. I go for a 2 hour glucose test on the 1st, and I'll only be 19+6. My midwife told me she'd send me twice. Once now and again at 26/27 weeks. I'm sure if you inquire, you could see if you can go for early testing. I'm not sure about monitoring at home, though. My sister has diabetes and a couple of my aunts have 'pre-diabetes', so in just trying to keep my diet healthy and my exercise regular. Using will power when I can to turn down sugary treats... If you have family history that is a risk factor. Also age over 35, certain ethnicities (eg. Asian, African, Hispanic, south Asian), if you're obese or have gained a significant amount of weight during your pregnancy. (Studying for the certified diabetes educator exam, which is proving useful already!) If you have a few risk factors you should get tested earlier, because why not? Usually routine testing in Canada is between 24-28 weeks. My sister has diabetes and a couple of my aunts have 'pre-diabetes', so in just trying to keep my diet healthy and my exercise regular. Using will power when I can to turn down sugary treats... Let me start off by saying I'm 35, obese, and have a family history of diabetes. My doctor hasn't mentioned me taking the gd diabetes test yet, and I am 18 weeks. I was/am worried about it so I have been checking my blood s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Exams And Tests

Gestational Diabetes - Exams And Tests

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all women who are not already diagnosed with diabetes be tested for gestational diabetes after the 24th week of pregnancy.1 The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that all pregnant women who are not already diagnosed with diabetes be tested for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. The method for testing may vary. Experts think that each method works as well as the other one.2 The first method can be done in two steps. You do not need to stop eating or drinking before the first step. In this step, you drink a liquid that contains 50 grams of sugar (glucose). Your blood sample is taken 1 hour later. If you don't have a lot of sugar in your blood, you do not have gestational diabetes. If you do have a lot of sugar in your blood, you will be asked to do the second step, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). With the OGTT, you cannot eat or drink for at least 8 hours before the test. You will drink a liquid that contains 100 grams of sugar (glucose). Your blood sample is taken 3 hours later to see how much sugar is in your blood. If you don't have a lot of sugar in your blood, you don't have gestational diabetes. If you do have a lot of sugar in your blood, you do have gestational diabetes. Some experts do not use the two-step method. They just use another version of the OGTT step. You cannot eat or drink for at least 8 hours before the test. You will drink a liquid that contains 75 grams of sugar (glucose). Your blood sample is taken 1 and then 2 hours later to see how much sugar is in your blood. If you don't have a lot of sugar in your blood, you do not have gestational diabetes. If you do have a lot of sugar in your blood, you do have gestational diabetes. If you have gest Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Screening may be done by taking the woman's medical history and examining certain risk factors, but an oral glucose tolerance test is also recommended. The oral glucose tolerance test is used to screen for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a specific type of diabetes that can develop in some women late in pregnancy (usually after the 24th week). Women who develop this complication do not have diabetes before becoming pregnant. The test is generally given between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If you have had gestational diabetes before, or if your health care provider is concerned about your risk of developing gestational diabetes, the test may be performed before the 13th week of pregnancy. The oral glucose tolerance test involves quickly drinking a sweetened liquid (called Glucola), which contains 50g of glucose. The body absorbs this glucose rapidly, causing blood glucose levels to rise within 30 to 60 minutes. A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm about 60 minutes after drinking the solution. The blood test measures how the glucose solution was metabolized (processed by the body). A blood glucose level of 140mg/dL or higher will identify 80% of women with gestational diabetes. When that cutoff is lowered to 130mg/dL, the identification increases to 90%. If your blood glucose level was greater than 130 mg/dL, your provider will likely recommend you take another diabetes screening test that requires you to fast (not eat anything) before the test. During this second test, called the 100-gram oral glucose tolerance test, your blood glucose level will be tested four times during a three-hour period after drinking the sweetened (many flavors are availabl Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Early Screening Of Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Recommended

Early Screening Of Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Recommended

Early Screening of Women at High Risk for Gestational Diabetes Recommended May 13, 2008 (New Orleans) The outcome of gestational diabetes appears similar whether a woman is screened early (during the first trimester of pregnancy) or later (during the second trimester). Furthermore, more women can be managed with oral agents rather than with insulin if risk is managed early. Two teams of investigators announced these results here during presentations at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 56th Annual Clinical Meeting. In the first study, Patricia L. Maran, MD, of Lehigh Valley Hospital, in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and colleagues took a retrospective look at 152 patients with gestational diabetes presenting for prenatal care from December 1, 2004, to June 30, 2006. The patients were matched 2:1 for age, race, and parity with nondiabetic controls. Their objective was to determine whether early screening, using a 50-g glucose challenge, improves pregnancy outcomes. Women were screened either at their first prenatal visit or between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, at the discretion of the physician. Women with a negative early screen underwent repeat screening at 24 to 28 weeks, using a 3-hour glucose-tolerance test. Of the 252 women screened, Dr. Maran's team identified 84 patients with gestational diabetes. Those screened early were more likely to be Hispanic (76% vs 55% of other ethnic origin; P=.02), to have a family history of diabetes mellitus (41% vs 27% with no family history; P=.02), or to have a history of gestational diabetes (21% vs 5% with no history; P=.001). Women with a higher body-mass index (BMI) (average, 31.9kg/m2) had a higher risk for gestational diabetes than those with a BMI less than 28.4kg/m2 (P=.002). Overall, 51% of those with a B Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Between three and eight per cent of women will get gestational diabetes between the 24th and the 28th week of pregnancy, sometimes earlier. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who are more likely to get gestational diabetes are: older mothers women who have a family history of type 2 diabetes women who are overweight women who are from certain ethnic backgrounds, including South Asian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern and Polynesian/Melanesian. Other women at risk include those who have had gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, large babies or birth complications in the past What is gestational diabetes? The hormone insulin moves glucose or sugar from your blood and into your body’s cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, this process is blocked and your cells become 'insulin resistant'. This causes you to have too much glucose in your blood. In pregnancy, the hormones from the placenta, which help your baby to grow, can cause your cells to become insulin resistant. Usually in pregnancy the body produces more insulin to counter this. In some women, however, this doesn’t happen and they develop gestational diabetes. There are many health issues associated with gestational diabetes, including that both the mother and baby will have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. During the pregnancy, gestational diabetes can lead to excessive sugars and fats crossing the placenta, which can have an effect on the baby’s growth, usually making them bigger. Giving birth to larger babies can also lead to problems with the birth. Sometimes, even though it might not seem to make sense, some babies (particularly larger babies) are born with blood sugar levels that are too low – this is called hypoglycaemia Continue reading >>

Tests & Diagnosis For Gestational Diabetes

Tests & Diagnosis For Gestational Diabetes

When will I be tested for gestational diabetes? Testing for gestational diabetes usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have an increased chance of developing gestational diabetes, your doctor may test for diabetes during the first visit after you become pregnant. How do doctors diagnose gestational diabetes? Doctors use blood tests to diagnose gestational diabetes. You may have the glucose challenge test, the oral glucose tolerance test, or both. These tests show how well your body uses glucose. Glucose Challenge Test You may have the glucose challenge test first. Another name for this blood test is the glucose screening test. In this test, a health care professional will draw your blood 1 hour after you drink a sweet liquid containing glucose. You do not need to fast for this test. Fasting means having nothing to eat or drink except water. If your blood glucose is too high—140 or more—you may need to return for an oral glucose tolerance test while fasting. If your blood glucose is 200 or more, you may have type 2 diabetes. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) The OGTT measures blood glucose after you fast for at least 8 hours. First, a health care professional will draw your blood. Then you will drink the liquid containing glucose. You will need your blood drawn every hour for 2 to 3 hours for a doctor to diagnose gestational diabetes. High blood glucose levels at any two or more blood test times—fasting, 1 hour, 2 hours, or 3 hours—mean you have gestational diabetes. Your health care team will explain what your OGTT results mean. Your health care professional may recommend an OGTT without first having the glucose challenge test. Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

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