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How Often Should Type 1 Diabetics Eat

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may discourage some with T1DM from exercising. Children and youth may be embarrassed by the temporary reduction in coordination and physical performance associated with hypoglycemia and by the fear of letting teammates down while playing. Some parents may discourage their children from normal participation in physical activity and from playing competitive sports because of concern about severe hypoglycemia. However, this fear may reduce a child’s physical activity, which may lead to reduced overall health, reduced enjoyment from exercise, and restricted confidence in meeting the demands imposed by living with a chronic health condition like diabetes. As a result, long-term exercise habits as well as personal growth and psycho-social development may be blunted. Concern with hypoglycemia from exercise is probably even more heightened in those with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of symptoms during hypoglycemia. However, some of these concerns might be allayed by the realization that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugars rather than lower it. The fact that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugar appears to be relatively unknown to many with T1DM. However, the effect has been confirmed in a number of studies. These studies have identified an exercise threshold that elicits this response. The threshold exercise intensity occurs at or above 80% of a person’s maximum exercis Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basic Facts

Diabetes: Basic Facts

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects the way the body turns sugar into energy. There are several types of diabetes. How the Body Turns Sugar into Energy The food we eat is made up of three things. They are carbohydrates (CAR-bow-HIdrates), which are sugars and starches; protein (PRO-teen); and fat. When we eat, a healthy body changes all of the carbohydrates and some of the protein and fat into a sugar. This sugar is called glucose (GLOOcose). From the small intestine, glucose moves into the blood. From the blood, glucose then moves into the cells of the body. The sugar we call glucose is the fuel, or energy, that the cells of the body need to do their work. Near the stomach is an organ called the pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas makes insulin (IN-suh-lin). Insulin is a hormone. When we eat, the sugar level in the blood goes up. The pancreas puts out more insulin. The insulin helps move the sugar out of the blood into the cells. The cells use the sugar for energy or store the sugar for use later. What happens when you have diabetes? When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t use the insulin properly. Sugar stays in your blood. Then the cells don’t get enough sugar for fuel. The body doesn’t have enough energy to do its work. Over time, the high level of sugar in the blood can damage the body. What are the types of diabetes? Three types of diabetes are the most common. Type 1 diabetes In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Sugar is unable to get into the cells. So the sugar level in the blood goes up. When the sugar level rises above normal, a person has high blood glucose. The name for high blood glucose is hyperglycemia (HIper-glice-EE-mee-uh). Most often children and young adults get Typ Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented but it can be managed through a combination of medication, healthy food choices and exercise. How many people have type 1 diabetes? Of all the people with diabetes it is estimated that about 10% of them have type 1 diabetes. Diabetes is the result of the body not creating enough insulin to keep blood glucose (sugar) levels in the normal range. Everyone needs some glucose in their blood, but if it’s too high it can damage your body over time. Type 1 diabetes is an ‘auto-immune’ condition. Basically the body sets up an attack against the cells within it that make insulin. These cells are called beta cells and are isolated in the pancreas. The result is that the body does not produce any insulin (or very little). When does type 1 diabetes normally occur? Type 1 diabetes most often occurs in childhood, often in children aged 7 – 12 years. However it can occur at any age – from tiny babies to very old people. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes Thirst Passing more urine Weight loss Very tired Mood changes May also have: Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting Skin infections, thrush Extreme hunger Poor concentration and performance Diagnosis and treatment Diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests which can be organised through your doctor. If you are very unwell you should seek medical assistance immediately. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to manage your blood glucose levels with insulin. Healthy eating and physical activity will also help you stay well. Click here to learn more about taking insulin. Does it run in families? If you have a blood relative with diabetes you are more likely to develop Type 1 diabetes. However Type 1 diabetes often occurs in people who have no one in their family with the condition. Is there any cure for type Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

The point of all treatment for Type 1 diabetes is to keep the level of glucose in your bloodstream as close as possible to normal. The nearer you get to achieving this, the better you will feel, especially in the long term. What do the results of a blood glucose test tell you? When you do a blood test you are measuring whether your previous insulin dose was right for you. For example, doing a test just before lunch will tell you how your morning injection of fast-acting insulin matched the carbohydrate you ate for breakfast. It's important to remember that lots of other things, like exercise, can affect the way insulin works, and a blood test can help you understand that and learn what your body does. People are usually recommended to test before each meal and before bed, and more often when they are ill because illness can sometimes make blood sugar rise very quickly. You should always test before driving, to make sure your blood sugar is not too low (hypo). Among the young people we talked to, the number of blood tests they did per day varied. In this summary young people talked about their reasons for checking their blood glucose levels more often than their doctors recommended, for doing them regularly, less often or not at all. Doing regular blood glucose tests Some of the young people we talked to have always tested their blood glucose regularly and this pattern hasn't change since diagnosis. Their main attitude is that it's something they have to do if they want to control their diabetes. Those who inject insulin every time they eat know that it's very important to check their glucose levels, to see how much insulin they need. They tend not to find anything difficult or unpleasant about doing the test. A few of them keep a diary to record their glucose results. A Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

I Am A Type 1 Diabetic. And Yes, I Can Eat That.

I Am A Type 1 Diabetic. And Yes, I Can Eat That.

By Brittainy Braniff, Queen’s InvisAbilities, Community Outreach Director I am a diabetic, diagnosed at the age of two. I have come to the conclusion that diabetes is a part of who I am and always will be. But, as I watch my favourite sitcom on television and hear “it tastes like diabetes!” or when I enter the checkout aisle at the grocery store and read magazine headings promising to ‘reverse’ diabetes, I become infuriated with the generalization of my chronic illness. It is coming to the point where diabetes is synonymously paired with poor health choices. As political parties remind us of the burdening cost of our healthcare system and social media groups discuss the obesity epidemic and the rapid increase of individuals being diagnosed with diabetes, a great opportunity has been created to bring attention to this debilitating disease. Hopefully, this attention will lead to prevention and better treatment, and even a cure. Although the increasing cost of diabetes to individuals, families and governments is a serious reality in Canada, some communications are detrimental to the true understanding Type 1 diabetes. In daily conversation I am reminded of the lack of understanding of the general public regarding what Type 1 Diabetes is and how it affects the individual living with it. I do believe that the only way to truly understand the effects of this hidden, chronic illness is through experience. I figured I would highlight some of these misconceptions and myths. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational Diabetes. • Type 1 Diabetes (T1) previously called Juvenile Diabetes, is most commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents, and occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce insulin (a hormone that controls levels of glucose Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Coeliac disease is more common in people who have Type 1 diabetes If you have coeliac disease and Type 1 diabetes, you should get guidance from a dietitian about how to manage your diet. Coeliac disease is more common in people who have Type 1 diabetes because they are both autoimmune diseases. Between 4 and 9% of people with Type 1 diabetes will also have coeliac disease. There is no increased risk of coeliac disease in people with Type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis For most people, Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed before coeliac disease, although it can happen the other way around. Some people with Type 1 diabetes appear to have mild or no obvious symptoms of coeliac disease, but their gut lining will still be damaged when they eat gluten. Coeliac disease can be missed in people with Type 1 diabetes as the symptoms of ill health can be attributed to the diabetes. When coeliac disease is diagnosed before diabetes, the symptoms of diabetes tend to be more severe and there is a higher likelihood of other autoimmune diseases.1 Recurrent hypoglycaemia can be a sign of coeliac disease in people with Type 1 diabetes.2 In children, having diabetes and growth problems may mean they also have coeliac disease.3 Some people with Type 1 diabetes may test negative for coeliac disease early in their diagnosis, but then positive at a later stage. British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN) recommended that children with Type 1 diabetes should be retested after three years or if symptoms occur. However, we would refer to the updated NICE guidelines which recommend that people with Type 1 diabetes should be tested for coeliac disease at diagnosis and retested if any symptoms of coeliac disease develop. If you have concerns speak with your GP. How coeliac dise Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Alicia Thomas Diaz, M.D. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes and juvenile diabetes, can develop at any age but most often occurs in children, teens, and young adults. In type 1 diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces little or no insulin, so insulin treatment is needed for a lifetime. The causes of type 1 diabetes are not fully known. In most cases, the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the part of the pancreas that produces insulin. This occurs over a period of time. so early on in type 1 diabetes, people may not have any symptoms. It is only when enough of the insulin producing cells are affected and insulin producing cells are affected and insulin levels are low that blood sugar rises and symptoms of diabetes start to occur. Because type 1 is an autoimmune disease, people with other autoimmune, conditions, such as Hashimoto disease or primary adrenal insufficiency (also known as Addison's Disease), are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes. Overall, cases of type 1 diabetes seem to be increasing. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can look like other conditions or medical problems. If you (or your child) have these symptoms, talk with your doctor as soon as possible. Increased thirst Increased urination Constant hunger Weight loss Blurred vision Constantly feeling tired How is type 1 diabetes diagnosed and treated? Your doctor will use blood tests to diagnose diabetes. A blood glucose level above 125 mg/dL after fasting overnight or above 200 mg/dL after eating may indicate diabetes. Your doctor may also take a medical history and order further blood tests to rule out type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes must have daily injections of insulin to keep a normal l Continue reading >>

There’s No Such Thing As A ‘diabetic Diet’

There’s No Such Thing As A ‘diabetic Diet’

For years, people with type 1 diabetes were told they needed to eat three meals and three snacks a day to keep their blood glucose levels from swinging too high or too low. Thankfully, with modern insulin analogues and regimens, you no longer need such a regimented diet. You can eat a little or a lot depending on what you feel like doing. Your diabetes care team can help you tailor your insulin treatment around your lifestyle. To make sure you’re getting the correct amount of insulin, you will need to consider what and how much you eat, so you can match the glucose entering your bloodstream with the insulin dose you take. Beginning to think about what is in your food and drink is often confusing at first, but your diabetes care team are there to help and it will become easier over time. It’s often recommended that you get tailored advice for your diet from a registered dietician. If you don’t have one already, ask your diabetes team to refer you. You can eat sugar Like anyone, it’s important to ensure you’re eating a healthy diet, but living with type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut sugar out of your diet completely. In fact, sugar can often be your friend when you’re having a hypo and need to boost your blood glucose levels. Carb counting Carb counting is an important part of managing your type 1 diabetes. When you eat carbohydrates (both starches such as potatoes, rice and pasta and sugars such as fruit, milk, honey and table salt), it’s broken down into glucose and absorbed into your bloodstream where it can be used for energy. It’s important to have a good understanding of how much, and what type, of carbohydrate is in the foods you eat as this will help you work out how much insulin you need to give with meals and snacks. There are structu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease

Topic Overview Is this topic for you? This topic covers type 1 diabetes in children. For information about type 1 diabetes in adults and about preventing complications from type 1 diabetes, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes develops when the pancreas stops making insulin. Your body needs insulin to let sugar (glucose) move from the blood into the body's cells, where it can be used for energy or stored for later use. Without insulin, the sugar cannot get into the cells to do its work. It stays in the blood instead. This can cause high blood sugar levels. A person has diabetes when the blood sugar is too high. What will it be like for your child to live with type 1 diabetes? Your child can live a long, healthy life by learning to manage his or her diabetes. It will become a big part of your and your child's life. You play a major role in helping your child take charge of his or her diabetes care. Let your child do as much of the care as possible. At the same time, give your child the support and guidance he or she needs. How can you manage diabetes? The key to managing diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. To do this, your child needs to take insulin, eat about the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal, and exercise. Part of your child's daily routine also includes checking his or her blood sugar levels at certain times, as advised by your doctor. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely he or she is to have problems, such as diseases of the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. For some reason, children seem protected from these problems during childhood. But if your child can control his or her blood sugar levels every day, it may help prevent problems later on. What symptoms should you wat Continue reading >>

Answers About Type 1 And Exercise

Answers About Type 1 And Exercise

Photo by Poby In today’s Well column, I write about the amazing accomplishments of Team Type 1, a cycling team comprised of athletes with Type 1 diabetes that just won the 3,000-mile Race Across America. After writing about the team, several readers asked specific questions about how the riders managed exercise and insulin needs. As a result, I’ve invited two experts to answer your questions about Type 1 and exercise –and anything else you might want to know about diabetes. Answering your questions this week will be: Dr. Robin Goland, director of the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Goland, associate professor of medicine at Columbia, also leads a clinical research program in diabetes. Dr. Goland has a B.A. from Harvard University and an M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. She also regularly treats several patients who are marathoners and triathletes. Phil Southerland, a founder of Team Type 1 cycling. Mr. Southerland, 27, was diagnosed with Type 1 at 7 months of age and is now a competitive cyclist and marathoner, and has twice competed in the Race Across America. Read the full story, “A 3,000-Mile Triumph, Spurred On by Diabetes.” And then, please send your questions about Type 1, exercise or any other diabetes-related issue. (Update: This post is no longer accepting questions, but readers can continue to discuss and post comments. Hopefully your questions are answered in the many responses below.) Scroll through all the comments to see questions answered in bold faced type. Or click on the following links to see all the questions we’ve answered. Does it ever get easier to manage Type 1 and exercise? How often should patients with Type 1 be checked for celiac disease? Are there any tricks t Continue reading >>

Living Gluten Free With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Gluten Free With Type 1 Diabetes

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 1 P. 34 Celiac disease is common in patients with type 1 diabetes. Understand the genetic link between these conditions and ways to counsel clients and patients. A type 1 diabetes diagnosis demands major lifestyle changes that include dietary modifications, regular physical activity, and a strict medication regimen. A celiac disease diagnosis also requires significant lifestyle changes that involve eating a gluten-free diet. Each disease is tough to manage on its own, but if both are diagnosed, either simultaneously or years apart, life for clients and patients can become even more complicated. However, RDs can help clients manage their diabetes and celiac disease as they follow a healthful gluten-free lifestyle. Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reports that about 1% of the US population has celiac disease, while an estimated 10% of individuals who have type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Several studies have explored the possible connection between these two disorders. A 2002 study by Barera and colleagues published in Pediatrics investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in 274 children and adolescents at the onset of type 1 diabetes and the occurrence of new cases during a six-year follow-up. The researchers found that the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes was approximately 20 times higher than in the general population. “The overall prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in the entire cohort of patients was 6.2%,” the authors wrote. They concluded that “sixty percent of [celiac disease] cases are already present at diabetes onset, mostly undetected, but an additional 40% of patients develop celiac disease a few years after diabetes onset.”1 R Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

Twitter Summary: @asbrown1 shares his top 10 tips for living w/ #T1D, straight from presentation to 100+ teens at #CWDFFL15 At the Children with Diabetes Friends For Life Conference this month, I had the incredible opportunity to speak to ~100 teenagers with diabetes. My talk, “10 Tips for Living Well with Type 1,” was a lot of fun to put together, and our team thought diaTribe readers might be interested in seeing it. I agonized over how to present this so that it wouldn’t come across as a lecture – even my teenage self would not react well to some of the advice (“Sleep seven hours a night? Hah! I have sports plus exams plus the next level to beat in Halo 3!”). I concluded that the best thing I could do was make this session a conversation, but ground it in lessons I’ve learned over time. Thankfully, I also had the amazing FFL staff by my side to help guide the discussion. The session reminded me of something that I intuitively know but often forget: each person’s diabetes is completely different, and what works for me won’t work for everyone. And equally important, what works for me may change over time – it certainly has since I was a teenager. I’m sharing the slides below in case they’re useful, but my biggest hope is that it gets you thinking about your own diabetes. What motivates you? What drags you down? What can you do better today? Who can you reach out to for support? Let us what you think by email or on Twitter. As the oldest of six kids, I had a lot of responsibility from a young age, and my Mom was also a very hands-off parent; both helped me take the reins of my diabetes from an early age. I hope everyone can find the right balance between taking care of their own diabetes, but also relying on their parents for support when needed. Continue reading >>

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