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How Often Do You Check Your Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes

Smart Testing Can Help You Control Your Diabetes

Smart Testing Can Help You Control Your Diabetes

Testing your blood sugar is a basic part of life for most people with diabetes. The numbers tell you and your health care team if your condition is under control. Still, for such a simple concept, it raises many questions. How often should you test? What time of the day should you do it? You and your doctors will work closely together to find the answers that will keep you healthy. Setting Goals You’re shooting for an A1c level of 7% or less, which equals an average glucose (or eAG) of 154 mg/dL. Your doctor will give you an A1c test every 3-6 months. When you should test and what goals you’re aiming for depend on: Your personal preferences How long you’ve had diabetes Your age Other health problems you may have Medicines you’re taking If you have low blood sugar (your doctor may call this hypoglycemia) without warning signs Testing Times Once you and your doctors figure out where your levels should be and the best way to get there (through diet, exercise, or medications), you’ll decide when you should check your blood sugar. A fasting blood glucose level (FBG), taken in the morning before you eat or drink anything, is the go-to test for many. Another test at bedtime is common. But what about other times? Testing 1 to 2 hours after breakfast or before lunch gives a more complete picture of what’s going on, says Pamela Allweiss, MD, of the CDC. The American Diabetes Association says testing right after a meal can provide your doctor with good info when your pre-meal blood-sugar levels are OK but you haven’t reached your A1c goal. “Monitoring is really important, particularly if you take insulin or medicine that can cause hypoglycemia,” says David Goldstein MD, professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. And measuring both before and afte Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

What Should My Blood Sugar Be?

What Should My Blood Sugar Be?

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

When To See Doctor

When To See Doctor

Early on in the course of prediabetes and diabetes, the fact is that the signs and symptoms can be very subtle and very easily missed. While there is lots going on in your body’s cells, tissues and organs, often there is very little along the lines of signs and symptoms. If you have any of the risk factors for diabetes (see below), yearly check-ups can be critically important for your health. Technically, signs are objective measured characteristics such as blood glucose levels while symptoms are subjective evidence of a disorder or disease. Symptoms may be pain, frequent thirst and fatigue. Early Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes Early diabetes is known as insulin resistance which can proceed to pre-diabetes. Not everyone exhibits these signs and symptoms. If you have any of the risk factors for diabetes, it would be a good idea to stay alert for any of the symptoms. A condition known as acanthosis nigricans, a darkening of the skin, particularly at the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and at the knuckles. If you notice any of this skin darkening, call your physician or dermatologist. This can signal prediabetes or diabetes. Increased thirst and more frequent urination. If you notice that you are more often thirsty and use the bathroom even more frequently than you might expect, make an appointment with your physician. Blurry vision is often a later sign of diabetes, but in some, it may occur early. If you notice any blurry vision, see your ophthalmologist or call your physician. You should also get your eyes checked by an optometrist to see if you need glasses or a new prescription. The factors or characteristics that you should be aware put you at a higher risk for prediabetes and diabetes include:1 Obesity or being overweight. This is generally meant as having a “Body Continue reading >>

Learn About Blood Sugar

Learn About Blood Sugar

Blood sugar is your body’s main source of energy. Your doctor probably told you that you have type 2 diabetes because you had too much sugar in your blood. Fortunately, there are ways to help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Want to know what makes blood sugar levels rise and fall? Need more information about the tests that measure your blood sugar levels? You’ve come to the right place. Do you know what causes blood sugar levels to rise and fall when you have type 2 diabetes? Do you want to learn what may help keep your levels under control? Here’s a little background. Insulin is a hormone that your pancreas makes. It helps sugar move out of the bloodstream and into many cells of the body, where it’s used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin, and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Both of these situations may lead to too much sugar in your blood. Help get back on track with the right treatment plan. Blood sugar levels may be controlled with the help of medicine and lifestyle changes. Talk to your doctor. By working together, you can come up with a plan to help you control your blood sugar. Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels every day with a glucose meter? What do the results of your A1C test mean? What numbers should you aim for? Here are some answers. The results of your daily self-tests with a glucose meter and the A1C test are important. They may help you and your doctor understand how well your type 2 diabetes treatment plan is working. Find out more about each test now. And to help make it easier to track your numbers, download a Daily Glucose Tracker. Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels every day with a glucose meter? What do Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

How Often Do You Check Your Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes ? |long Live Facts – How Do Diabetics Check Blood Sugar

How Often Do You Check Your Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes ? |long Live Facts – How Do Diabetics Check Blood Sugar

How Do Diabetics Check Blood Sugar If you have type 1 diabetes, check your blood sugar level at least 4 times a day. When should I check my blood sugar often, should my sugar? (type 1) diabetes daily. After meals (1 to 2 hours after eating), your blood sugar level should be that it feels good, but if the levels are 28, if you want a lab, at least also discuss how often you perform the test, change prediabetes or write diabetes care plan. . Diabetes blood glucose control test. If you have prediabetes, you should assess your blood sugar level a. Diabetes type 2 blood sugar levels. Blood sugar test why, when and how may clinic. Good guidelines for type 2 diabetes do not contain recommendations for testing blood glucose. It is particularly important when you feel bad. There are many different types that offer features and prices to know how often you should evaluate your levels. In general, the reasons for reviewing level 4 sugar are a priority if so, especially if insulin is used 16 people who have risk factors for diabetes; A history of high-pressure cholesterol; 24 learn sugar, avoid finger pains, more. If you manage your type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise, you can treat high blood sugar a walk around block 20 you also need to check the level more often if you are sick, change your daily routine or start taking new medicines if you take insulin diabetes, recommend the doctor twice a day, depending on the amount of this tends to be of particular use for people. How and when to test your webmd of blood sugar. How often should I check my blood glucose levels? . A routine for the frequency and the time when you should analyze your blood sugar level. How often should I analyze my diabetes? Diabetes How often should diabetics control their blood sugar levels for review? Th Continue reading >>

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when Continue reading >>

When To Get Tested For Type 2 Diabetes

When To Get Tested For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes happens when a person's body either can't make enough insulin to keep up with the body's needs or can't use the insulin it makes in the right way. Insulin helps your body turn sugar into energy. It also helps your body store sugar in your muscles, fat, and liver so it can be used later when you need it. Without insulin, your body can't use or store sugar for energy. Instead, the sugar stays in your blood. This leads to high blood sugar levels, putting you at risk for other serious health problems. Symptoms Some symptoms of type 2 diabetes, caused by having high blood sugar, are: Feeling more tired than usual Urinating more often Extreme thirst or dehydration More infections than normal Wounds that don't heal Dry, itchy skin Numbness or tingling in hands or feet Blurred eyesight Problems having sex Make an appointment to see your doctor if you have any of these symptoms. Risk Factors Even if you don't have signs of diabetes, talk to your doctor about being tested for type 2 diabetes if you have any of the following risk factors: BMI: Overweight with a BMI (Body Mass Index) higher than 25 Age: Over the age of 45 Family heritage: African-American, Hispanic, Native American, or Asian Family history: Mother, father, sister, or brother with type 2 diabetes Pregnancy history: Gestational diabetes Health history: Polycystic ovarian disease Testing If your doctor recommends that you get tested for type 2 diabetes, you'll need to come to the lab for a fasting blood glucose test, which is done in the morning before you've had anything to eat or drink. Your test results will tell us if you need to be tested again and how often. If your test result is a fasting blood glucose less than 100, you don't have diabetes. Plan to get tested every 2 years to make sure that yo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation. When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels. There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal. To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on one thing: Regular monitoring is critical in diabetes care. Why monitor? Self-monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management because it puts you in charge. Regardless of how you manage your diab Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

How Often Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Checked?

How Often Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Checked?

Image: Thinkstock Get your blood sugar checked annually if you have prediabetes—higher-than-normal blood sugar levels. Your risk factors determine whether you should be screened annually or every three years. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

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