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How Much Does Donating Blood Lower A1c

Could Your Hba1c Diabetes Test Be Wrong?

Could Your Hba1c Diabetes Test Be Wrong?

A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a preferred screening test for diabetes. Done easily with a fingerstick in your physician’s office, it eliminates the need for fasting (not eating) prior to the test. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed if two consecutive A1c levels are greater than or equal to 6.5. What is the HbA1c? Red blood cells are permeable to glucose (sugar)—so after they enter your circulation, glucose becomes attached to them. The degree to which your red cells become “sugar coated” depends on your blood glucose level. The A1c indicates the average blood sugar level over the lifespan of the red cell—and it lines up with average blood sugar over the previous 2 – 3 months. Take home message here: your HbA1c will not be affected if you had pizza the night before, unlike a random blood sugar test. But because the A1c is influenced by the total life cycle of your red cells, the levels can be inaccurate in some folks. Here are some times the HbA1c will not be helpful: A1c falsely elevated (HIGH) Your test may tell you that you have diabetes, but you don’t. Untreated anemia from iron deficiency or vitamin B12 and folate deficiency can result in a HbA1c value that is falsely high because your red cell turnover is low. Because you have more “older” red cells instead of making new ones (due to lack of iron, or other vitamins) your HbA1c will be higher than it should be. Kidney failure or chronic kidney disease. If you have abnormal kidney function your HbA1c may be falsely high. Very high triglycerides (over 1,750) may also cause a falsely elevated HbA1c. Splenectomy (spleen surgically removed) will give you a falsely elevated HbA1c, due to decreased red cell turnover. This is because the spleen can’t remove the red cells from the bloodstream—whi Continue reading >>

Factors That Will Artificially Lower Your A1c

Factors That Will Artificially Lower Your A1c

Factors that will artificially lower your A1c Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Factors that will artificially lower your A1c I have just found out that anaemia (lowered red cell blood count) will artificially give you a lower A1c. I only have mild anaemia so I'm unsure of how much difference this actually makes but it is one factor that I have to take into account whenever I get tested now (as long as the anaemia persists). My diabetes nurse educator also mentioned that another thing that will drastically reduce your A1c is if you donate blood just before getting tested! My impression is that it's a sneaky way of artificially reducing it that some diabetics employ So if you don't want to fudge your A1c, don't give blood close to the date you go to test for it. why would you donate blood to get a better score anyway? You know you are lying to yourself. Only reason I could ever think was if you had a bet with someone LOL. True. It can also be affected by (1) Chronic renal failure (2) Levels of Vitamin A & C (3) hemolytic disease. These details are from my last lab report. I don't think being mildly anaemic makes a huge difference. At one point in my pregnancy (maybe about 28 or 30 weeks) my blood results came back mildly anaemic, and my HbA1C was 5.5%. the next blood test, maybe 3 or 4 weeks later, my iron levels were back up and my HbA1C was 5.3%; I know that my control hasnt changed dramatically over this time so I don't think the inital 5.5 was artificially low. Don't know why someone would want to deliberately manipulate, it's not going to give you a very good idea of whats going on in your body and whether you need to mak Continue reading >>

10 Facts About A1c Levels

10 Facts About A1c Levels

What is A1C The use of A1c levels is a very convenient way of diagnosing and examining people with diabetes type 1 and 2. If the levels of glucose in the blood is high, then the A1c levels will be high. Before we proceed with the significant aspects of A1C, let us first identify what is hemoglobin A1C blood test below. What is A1C Test Hemoglobin A1C test (also hemoglobin A1c, Hgb A1c, glycohemoglobin, or HbA1c test) is a blood test to determine the average blood sugar levels of an individual for the past 3 months. Now, what is normal A1C? Hemoglobin A1C Range We can categorically place range positions for hba1c normal levels and high levels as indicated below. What is a normal A1C level? Normal A1C levels are within the A1C range of 4% to 5.6%. If within the A1C normal range, it means the person doesn’t have diabetes. What is a high A1C level? HgA1c levels out of the normal hemoglobin A1C range poses possible problem. A level between 5.7% and 6.4% is indicative of the risk of diabetes. While an A1C level of 6.5% or more is already A1C diabetes, meaning it indicates the presence of diabetes. A1C Calculator To compute your A1C you can simply use the formula below. Glucose in mg/dL: A1c = (46.7 + average_blood_glucose) / 28.7 Glucose in mmol/L: A1c = (2.59 + average_blood_glucose) / 1.59 For further details, you may refer to the A1C levels chart at the end of this post. Facts About Hemoglobin A1c Levels 1. Helps identify blood sugar levels HgbA1c levels is an effective way of testing blood sugar levels in the body. The test is performed by having an amount of blood taken for examination through the pricking of a finger. At times, the blood is drawn from the vein. 2. Evaluates glucose level for a longer period A1c levels evaluate and determine the average glucose level i Continue reading >>

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Whole Blood Donation Affects the Interpretation of Hemoglobin A1c 2Department of Clinical Chemistry, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 3European Reference Laboratory for Glycohemoglobin, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 4Department Donor Studies, Sanquin, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 7Department of Internal Medicine, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 8Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands 2Department of Clinical Chemistry, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 3European Reference Laboratory for Glycohemoglobin, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 1Sanquin Blood Bank Division, Zwolle, the Netherlands 2Department of Clinical Chemistry, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 3European Reference Laboratory for Glycohemoglobin, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 4Department Donor Studies, Sanquin, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 6Department Medical Donor Affairs, Sanquin Blood Bank Division, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 7Department of Internal Medicine, Isala Hospital, Zwolle, the Netherlands 8Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands Baylor College of Medicine, UNITED STATES Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Conceptualization: AD ELW WK AGB HJGB RJS MJV. Received 2016 Dec 11; Accepted 2017 Jan 11. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Several f Continue reading >>

Glycated Hemoglobin

Glycated Hemoglobin

Glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, A1C, or Hb1c; sometimes also referred to as being Hb1c or HGBA1C) is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average plasma glucose concentration. The test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is four months (120 days). However, since RBCs do not all undergo lysis at the same time, HbA1C is taken as a limited measure of 3 months. It is formed in a non-enzymatic glycation pathway by hemoglobin's exposure to plasma glucose. HbA1c is a measure of the beta-N-1-deoxy fructosyl component of hemoglobin.[1] The origin of the naming derives from Hemoglobin type A being separated on cation exchange chromatography. The first fraction to separate, probably considered to be pure Hemoglobin A, was designated HbA0, the following fractions were designated HbA1a, HbA1b, and HbA1c, respective of their order of elution. There have subsequently been many more sub fractions as separation techniques have improved.[2] Normal levels of glucose produce a normal amount of glycated hemoglobin. As the average amount of plasma glucose increases, the fraction of glycated hemoglobin increases in a predictable way. This serves as a marker for average blood glucose levels over the previous three months before the measurement as this is the lifespan of red blood cells. In diabetes mellitus, higher amounts of glycated hemoglobin, indicating poorer control of blood glucose levels, have been associated with cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. A trial on a group of patients with Type 1 diabetes found that monitoring by caregivers of HbA1c led to changes in diabetes treatment and improvement of metabolic control compared to monitoring only of blood or urine glu Continue reading >>

Coca-cola And Jp Morgan (leo Potishman Foundation) Funds A1c Screening For High School Diabetes Risk

Coca-cola And Jp Morgan (leo Potishman Foundation) Funds A1c Screening For High School Diabetes Risk

Coca-Cola and JP Morgan (Leo Potishman Foundation) Funds A1C Screening for High School Diabetes Risk By Carter BloodCare | 0 comment | General | 18 August, 2016 The major contribution that high school students make to our nations blood supply is significantly under appreciated. Some 20% of the blood that is transfused in our country is donated by teenagers. We are indebted to these altruistic students and to the schools hosting blood drives for the needs of patients in our community. At Carter BloodCare, we feel we can go beyond our heartfelt thanks to students. There is compelling evidence that the risk for heart disease and diabetes, starting in the young, is increasing dramatically. With this in mind, students donating blood at Carter BloodCare have, in addition to the tests mandated by the FDA, a total cholesterol measurement, their blood pressure taken and during the fall 2016 school semester a hemoglobin A1C determination (blood sugar). We encourage them to review their results on the blood centers website after donating. For some, this may be their first early warning sign of a future health risk. TheA1C testis a bloodtestthat provides information about a persons average levels of blood glucose (also called blood sugar) over the past three months. This test does not require fasting or any preparation aside from the typical pre-donation prep. TheA1C testis sometimes called the hemoglobinA1C, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobintest. But why is it important? There is currently a global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, and the prevalence in all age groups is estimated to increase from 2.8 percent in 2000 to 4.4 percent in 2030. There are many complications for those living with diabetes, most notably the increased risk of heart disease and stroke. With correct treatment and lifes Continue reading >>

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Abstract Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA1c in both non-diabetic blood donors and blood donors with type 2 diabetes. In this observational study, 23 non-diabetic blood donors and 21 blood donors with type 2 diabetes donated 475 mL whole blood and were followed prospectively for nine weeks. Each week blood samples were collected and analyzed for changes in HbA1c using three secondary reference measurement procedures. Twelve non-diabetic blood donors (52.2%) and 10 (58.8%) blood donors with type 2 diabetes had a significant reduction in HbA1c following blood donation (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). All non-diabetic blood donors with a normal ferritin concentration predonation had a significant reduction in HbA1c. In the non-diabetic group the maximum reduction was -11.9%, in the type 2 diabetes group -12.0%. When eligible to donate again, 52.2% of the non-diabetic blood donors and 41.2% of the blood donors with type 2 diabetes had HbA1c concentrations significantly lower compared to their predonation concentration (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). Patients with type 2 diabetes contributing to whole blood donation programs can be at risk of falsely lowered HbA1c. This could lead to a wrong interpretation of their glycemic control by their general practitioner or internist. Continue reading >>

Re: [ip] Blood Donation & A1c

Re: [ip] Blood Donation & A1c

From: Elizabeth Blake < email @ redacted > Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2007 09:27:28 -0700 (PDT) --- David wrote:> Does anyone have any information on how a 1 pint> blood donation would effect> the accuracy of a subsequent A1c reading.I think I had asked about this awhile ago as well. Idonated blood 2 1/2 weeks ago and I'm going to have anA1c done next week. My last 2 were 6.0 and ifthere's any change, I doubt it will be due to donatingblood. I found this information on the followingpage: Q: "I am a type 2 diabetic, controlling it by diet. Ialso am a blood donor. I would like to know whateffects donating blood every 2 months will have on theresults of my A1C (which is done every 3 months)."A: I have read conflicting information on the effectsof donating blood: one source said it would have noeffect, while another recommended that you time yourA1C to be just before you donate blood. So to resolvethis dilemma, I consulted a highly respectedEndocrinologist, Anne Peters MD, Director of the USCClinical Diabetes Program in Los Angeles, California.Here is her reply:"Donating blood should not significantly affect theA1C. It could make it slightly lower (removing new andold red blood cells that get replaced by new, lessglycated red blood cells from the person's bonemarrow) but in general the effect is not clinicallysignificant. GETTING a blood transfusion makes a bigdifference in A1C levels, falsely lowering it(assuming the person donating the blood does not havediabetes)." --LizType 1 dx 4/1987Minimed 715 5/2005 ____________________________________________________________________________________Got a little couch potato? Check out fun summer activities for kids. &p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz.----------------------------------------------------------for HELP or t Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

When The A1c Is Unreliable

When The A1c Is Unreliable

Although hemoglobin A1c is usually the best test to estimate the average glycemic control in patients with diabetes, it is unreliable in some clinical circumstances. In select patient populations, measuring fructosamine and glycated albumin levels may also be useful. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Related Content Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: Does Lowering Hemoglobin A1c Help or Harm? Structured Diet Plan Improves A1c in Type 2 Diabetes _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Q1. What is the A1c and why is it important? A: A1c represents the percent of hemoglobin A with glucose bound to it. While the percent is normally low, in diabetics the higher glucose circulating in the blood causes more hemoglobin binding which results in a higher A1c level. It also can correlate with average glycemic control during the past 2 to 3 months. The American Diabetes Association recommends measuring A1c—≥ 6.5% (48mmol/mol)—as a diagnostic criterion for diabetes and quantifying A1c as the standard laboratory assessment to determine control of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.1 Since the publication of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial in 1993, we know that A1c levels also directly correlate to the risk of developing diabetic complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy.2 Q2. When is the A1c unreliable? A: For A1c standard test results to be reliable, normal adult hemoglobin A must be present for glucose binding. However, a number of clinically significant disorders alter hemoglobin either structurally or chemically thereby aff Continue reading >>

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood. Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed. You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood. Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions. Another thing to know is that if you plan to donate platelets, you should not take aspirin or blood thinners for several days prior to your donation. 1 If you have heart complications from your diabetes, there are some things that you ne Continue reading >>

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

i was recently tested for Hemoglobin A1c because i presented to an endocrinologist with extremely low blood glucose on lab test and some scary symptoms, not the ordinary hypoglycemia symptoms. My A1c was 4.7 which registered as low (L) on the lab print out–it was only slightly low. Does a low score on this suggest a possibility of short-lived RBCs? Does it have any relationship with extremely low blood glucose? my result at the lab, fasting, was 32mg/dL. Not long after that i got a home glucometer and i get the same kind of results on that as the lab got, in the 20s and 30s first thing in the morning, every day. did not know i had hypoglycemia until i had that lab test, though i had had one episode where i woke up with ataxia, i fell while walking to the bathroom first thing in the morning, i got up and immediately fell again. I soon found that i had very impaired coordination. i did not know why and i was very worried. Eventually i wanted to have breakfast but had great difficulty holding the measuring cup under the faucet, to get some water to heat, to make instant oatmeal, i lacked the coordination to get the water into the cup. I persisted and did make the instant oatmeal (pour hot water onto flakes and it’s done), and i got my lap top and was eating the oatmeal and i suddenly was aware that the symptoms were going away. Previously i had been unable to type. While eating the small amount of oatmeal, i realized i could type. That was about a month before the lab test. Since it only happened that once, i put it out of my mind. About 5 days after the lab test, i had the second episode, worse than the first, i woke falling out of bed to the floor, couldn’t use my arm to break the fall, i didn’t have the coordination. i sat on the floor, i could not get up and wa Continue reading >>

4 Surprising Health Benefits Of Blood Donation

4 Surprising Health Benefits Of Blood Donation

4 Surprising Health Benefits Of Blood Donation Possible Reduction In Certain Cancer Risk When you donate blood you save lives and help improve people's health. But for the donor, blood donation can go beyond the satisfaction of doing your bit and helping someone out. It can be an opportunity to take a closer look at your own health. In addition, your iron levels are kept in check by donating blood, which in turn might just lower your cancer and cardiovascular disease risk. Every two seconds someone in the country has an urgent need for blood. That may be a sobering statistic, but what is heartening is that an estimated 6.8 million Americans donate blood every year.1 So should you consider becoming a donor too? As the demand for blood rises, so does the need for donors. And while the necessity of your donating for someone who needs blood is undeniable, did you know that blood donation has benefits for you, the donor, too? Blood donation is an essential link in the healthcare and medical system with a daily demand for 36,000 units of red blood cells, 10,000 units of plasma, and 7,000 units of platelets. People with certain illnesses like sickle cell disease or cancer need multiple transfusions through the year. And about 3 pints of red blood is used per transfusion on an average. Thats not counting the many cases of car accidents where an individual victim may need as much as 100 pints of blood.2 Burn victims, accident victims, women whore giving birth, as well as those with blood diseases like thalassemia, bleeding disorders like hemophilia, severe anemias, or leukemia may all need blood.3 Advantages Of Blood Donation For The Donor Donating blood can go beyond helping someone else who needs your blood. In fact, blood donation can benefit your own health too. Before you Continue reading >>

Donate Blood As A Diabetic??

Donate Blood As A Diabetic??

Friend T2 since 4-16-2008 / 1000 mg Metformin This may be a really dumb question, but I used to donate blood twice a year. I stopped about 3 years ago though and haven't since my diagnosis 3 months ago. Can you donate blood as a diabetic? Does it tend to artificially mess up your HbA1c because your body has to create new blood cells? Anyways, they are having a blood drive at work coming up soon and I was thinking about donating but I'm not sure if they take blood from a diabetic. I know it is not contagious just wondering. D.D. Family T1 since 1987, pumping MM Revel + CGMS I don't know if it varies from state to state but in New York both T1 and T2 diabetics can donate blood. There are a zillion exceptions on the form but not all of them relate to diabetes. I know you can't donate if you've used animal insulin in X years, but using insulin itself doesn't disqualify you and I don't think any Type 2 oral meds are on the disqualified list. I've given blood a couple of times but for the past two years I keep getting rejected because I don't pass the hemoglobin finger stick check. Talk about needing a huge blood drop! Makes me glad BG meters require such small samples. Hey I haven't tried it either. I've been wondering about it myself. This may be a really dumb question, but I used to donate blood twice a year. I stopped about 3 years ago though and haven't since my diagnosis 3 months ago. Can you donate blood as a diabetic? Does it tend to artificially mess up your HbA1c because your body has to create new blood cells? Anyways, they are having a blood drive at work coming up soon and I was thinking about donating but I'm not sure if they take blood from a diabetic. I know it is not contagious just wondering. Donors with diabetes who since 1980, ever used bovine (beef) insu Continue reading >>

A1c And Blood Glucose Levels

A1c And Blood Glucose Levels

Does your hemoglobin A1c level not appear to agree with the average meter readings you get at home? You’re not alone. There are numerous reasons your A1c might appear to be higher or lower than what you were expecting. The most common reason is related to the fact that your A1c reflects an average blood glucose (BG) level. You can have a lot of highs but also a lot of lows and end up with a relatively normal A1c, the same as you’d have if you kept your BG levels normal all the time. But this isn’t the only reason for variation. The A1c depends on glycation of the hemoglobin in your red blood cells (RBCs). Glycation means adding glucose, and the higher your BGs are, the more glucose you’ll add to the hemoglobin. Anything that affects the lifetime of your RBCs, which are assumed to live 120 days, will affect the A1c. If you give blood or have some kind of internal bleeding, or if you have a hemolytic anemia, you will lose some of the older RBCs cells with a lot of glycated hemoglobin, and your body will make new RBCs with unglycated hemoglobin, so the percentage of glycated hemoglobin will be lower, and your A1c will be lower. Conversely, if you have spleen damage or no spleen at all, your body will take longer to remove old RBCs from your body, because the spleen is where this housekeeping chore normally happens. In addition, individuals may have average RBC lifetimes that are different from normal. Finally, different people may glycate hemoglobin at different rates because of individual variation in the enzymes involved. Numerous studies throughout the years have investigated this problem and shown that the A1c does not always match average BG levels. Recently a report, titled Does A1c consistently reflect mean plasma glucose? was published in the Journal of Dia Continue reading >>

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