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How Much Cinnamon To Lower Blood Sugar

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The objective of this study was to determine whether cinnamon improves blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 60 people with type 2 diabetes, 30 men and 30 women aged 52.2 ± 6.32 years, were divided randomly into six groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 consumed 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon daily, respectively, and groups 4, 5, and 6 were given placebo capsules corresponding to the number of capsules consumed for the three levels of cinnamon. The cinnamon was consumed for 40 days followed by a 20-day washout period. RESULTS—After 40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced the mean fasting serum glucose (18–29%), triglyceride (23–30%), LDL cholesterol (7–27%), and total cholesterol (12–26%) levels; no significant changes were noted in the placebo groups. Changes in HDL cholesterol were not significant. CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study demonstrate that intake of 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon per day reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes and suggest that the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases is increased two- to fourfold in people with type 2 diabetes (1). Although the causes of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are multifactorial, diet definitely plays a role in the incidence and severity of these diseases. The dietary components beneficial in the prevention and treatment of these diseases have not been clearly defined, but it is postulated that spices may play a role. Spices such as cinnamon, cloves Continue reading >>

How To Eat Cinnamon To Lower Blood Sugar While On Diabetic Medicine

How To Eat Cinnamon To Lower Blood Sugar While On Diabetic Medicine

Although a sprinkle of cinnamon on your breakfast cereal may not be an effective tool for lowering glucose levels, cinnamon extract, taken in capsule form, might improve blood glucose levels. Taking at least 1g, but no more than 6g of cinnamon daily might reduce fasting glucose levels by almost 30 percent and reduce triglyceride levels and total cholesterol levels as well. Because cinnamon may have a drastic effect on your diabetes, always consult your doctor before adding cinnamon to your diet as part of your diabetes treatment plan. Monitor your blood sugar levels closely, as you may have to decrease your diabetes medication. Video of the Day Use cassia cinnamon, the most common variety sold in the U.S. -- although it's grown in Central America, Indonesia and China -- rather than Ceylon cinnamon. Add cinnamon to your diet gradually. Start with 1g daily and take it gradually throughout the day, rather than taking it all at once. Record your glucose levels and note any changes to discuss with your doctor. Do not stop or alter your current diabetes medications without consulting your physician. Gradually increase the amount of cinnamon in your diet, constantly monitoring your glucose levels. Researchers are not sure why cinnamon affects glucose levels, and several studies have shown mixed results. Diabetes Health reports that "data regarding cinnamon’s efficacy in reducing glucose levels in patients with diabetes is inconsistent at best." Continue reading >>

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

Reader Approved Three Methods:Incorporating Cinnamon Into Your DietAdding a Cinnamon Supplement to Your Treatment RegimenUnderstanding Why Cinnamon Helps with DiabetesCommunity Q&A Cinnamon is not only a spice packed with healthful antioxidants. It can also be used to help diabetics control their blood glucose levels. While it should not completely replace other treatments, consult your physician about adding to your treatment regimen. 1 Use cinnamon to replace sugar. Because cinnamon is so flavorful, it can often replace small amounts of sugar in stove-top recipes, sauces, meat, and vegetable dishes. Replacing a sweetener with this spice can help reduce the amount of sugar you consume and improve your blood glucose levels. Cinnamon is considered safe when used in the amounts normally found as foods-- this works out to roughly ½ to 1 teaspoon or about 1000 mg per day. 2 Add cinnamon to your breakfast. For instance, stir cinnamon and a small amount of agave nectar into oatmeal in the morning, adding berries and nuts to make it an even more nutritious breakfast. Or top off buttered whole grain toast with a dash of cinnamon and a sprinkle of a crystallized sweetener like Stevia or Splenda. Cinnamon also goes well with peanut butter or sugar-free jam on toast. 3 Use cinnamon in meat sauces. Cinnamon pairs well with poultry, pork, and beef spice rubs as well as Asian-themed dishes, marinades, and salad dressings. Mixing to taste, replace some of the sugar or brown sugar with cinnamon for homemade barbecue sauces, pulled pork marinade, berry compotes, and even marinara sauces. 4 Replace sugar in vegetable dishes. Use cinnamon in place of brown sugar or regular sugar in candied vegetable dishes, such as candied yams, baby carrots, or sweet stir fry. Cinnamon lends a complex, Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes. Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Here’s what we know Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: 2003 study In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. 2012 study A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients in China with type 2 diabetes. One group took 120 milligrams of cinnamon daily, another 360 milligrams and a third a placebo. After three months Continue reading >>

Can Cinnamon Ease Diabetes Symptoms?

Can Cinnamon Ease Diabetes Symptoms?

Diabetes is a chronic disorder in which your blood sugar, or glucose, is too high. If your blood sugar stays high for long periods, it could be harmful to your health. Possible complications of diabetes include an increased risk of: heart disease stroke kidney disease nerve damage Diet, regular exercise, and medications can ease diabetes symptoms and help you control your blood sugar. Some people also add alternative treatments to their treatment plan. Cinnamon is one alternative treatment that has been explored for diabetes. Check with your doctor before you begin taking any type of dietary supplement. Cinnamon is used widely in cooking, but you can also find it in some people’s medicine cabinets. The spice has been used in traditional medicine for centuries, especially in China, India, and Southeast Asia. Scientific evidence doesn’t always back up the use of cinnamon for medical conditions, but people have used it to treat bronchitis, stomach problems, and diabetes. Using cinnamon to control diabetes symptoms has been studied in recent years. The results vary, but the possibility of using cinnamon as a natural treatment for diabetes is exciting for both researchers and people with the condition. Researchers have studied the effect of cinnamon bark on blood sugar in animals, but they haven’t studied it widely in people. A few studies published in the Annals of Family Medicine and Diabetes Care show that people with type 2 diabetes may benefit from cinnamon. Blood tests show that some people had better control of their sugar levels when they took cinnamon supplements along with their normal treatments. In some cases, cholesterol levels were lower, too. Although cinnamon seems like it may help people with type 2 diabetes, it’s hard to know if the spice can work f Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Helps Lower Blood Sugar

Cinnamon Helps Lower Blood Sugar

Building Optimal Health Cinnamon Helps Lower Blood Sugar Print Author: Caroline MacDougall It was discovered by accident. The US Department of Agriculture was conducting experiments on foods to see how fast they raise blood sugar. Oddly enough, America’s favorite apple pie had just the opposite effect. It helped reduce blood sugar! If you are insulin resistant, have type 2 diabetes or just want to stabilize your blood sugar to help lose weight, here is a delicious way to lower your blood sugar and reduce both your cholesterol and blood pressure while you naturally stimulate your metabolism. Apple pie, high in both cane and fruit sugars, should have raised blood sugar, not lowered it. When researchers at the US Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland discovered this phenomenon, they delved into finding what caused it. Richard Anderson, the scientist in charge of the study, found that cinnamon in the apple pie was responsible for making fat cells more receptive to insulin. One of his postdoctoral students, Alam Khan, decided to conduct a test in Pakistan to see what effect cinnamon would have on diabetics. 60 participants with type 2 diabetes were given between 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon powder a day, for 40 days, in capsules after meals. Within a short period of time, their blood sugar levels dropped an average of 20% lower than the control group of diabetics who were only taking a placebo. Cinnamon helped some of the diabetics even reduce their blood sugar to normal levels during the course of the study. The effects of the cinnamon were not permanent however. When the diabetics stopped taking the cinnamon, their blood sugar levels rose again. MHCP: the water-soluble polyphenol that lowers blood sugar The active principl Continue reading >>

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

A 12-week London study was recently conducted involving 58 type 2 diabetics with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over 7 percent. Hemoglobin A1c is a marker for long-term glycemic control in diabetics. After 12 weeks on 2g of cinnamon per day, study subjects had significantly lower HbA1c levels, as well as significantly reduced blood pressures (systolic, SBP and diastolic, DBP). The researchers’ conclusion: “Intake of 2g of cinnamon for 12 weeks significantly reduces the HbA1c, SBP and DBP among poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Cinnamon supplementation could be considered as an additional dietary supplement option to regulate blood glucose and blood pressure levels along with conventional medications to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.” In related news, a new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill points to a connection between magnesium in the diet and lowered risk of diabetes. According to Reuters: “It's plausible that magnesium could influence diabetes risk because the mineral is needed for the proper functioning of several enzymes that help the body process glucose.” Researchers studied magnesium intake and diabetes risk in about 4,500 men and women aged 18 to 30. None of the participants were diabetic at the start of the study. Over the ensuing 20 years, 330 of the test subjects developed diabetes. The people with the highest magnesium intake – about 200 milligrams for every 1,000 calories consumed – were almost 50 percent less likely to develop diabetes than men and women who consumed about 100 milligrams per 1,000 calories. The study also revealed that as magnesium intake increased, inflammation levels decreased, as did insulin resistance. IMPORTANT NOTE: Reuters reports one wildly inaccurate conclusion: that consuming w Continue reading >>

More News On Blood Sugar: Ceylon Cinnamon Can Help

More News On Blood Sugar: Ceylon Cinnamon Can Help

Q: My doctor says I have pre-diabetes. I have read your columns about the advantages of Ceylon cinnamon for people with diabetes. Would this help me with my pre-diabetes? Ceylon cinnamon is hard to find. Would Saigon cinnamon work as well? Are there other natural herbs or spices I should consider taking? A: Cinnamon and other spices and herbs rich in plant polyphenols can help control blood sugar and insulin spikes after meals (Diabetologia, July 2015). One placebo-controlled trial found that a supplement containing cassia cinnamon, chromium and carnosine successfully lowered fasting blood sugar in people with pre-diabetes (PLOS One, Sept. 25, 2015). Most studies of cinnamon to lower blood sugar have used ordinary cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) rather than the more expensive Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylonicum). Saigon cinnamon is closely related to cassia cinnamon. You shouldn’t need Ceylon cinnamon to get the blood-sugar benefits. If you take either cassia or Saigon cinnamon, though, we suggest a water extract rather than the powdered spice. Both cassia cinnamon and Saigon cinnamon contain coumarin, a natural compound that can harm the liver when taken in large amounts. Coumarin is not water-soluble, however. There are a number of other spices that can be helpful. They include caraway, cumin, ginger, fenugreek and turmeric. You can learn much more about these spices and their beneficial effects from our 200-page book “Spice Up Your Health.” It is available at www.PeoplesPharmacy.com. It is important to monitor your blood-sugar levels very carefully. Your doctor will want to monitor your progress, so a daily diary with glucose levels will enable her to make sure you are within normal limits. If natural products, exercise and a low-carb diet don’t work, Continue reading >>

How To Use Cinnamon To Lower Your Blood Sugar

How To Use Cinnamon To Lower Your Blood Sugar

In the video below, I quickly summarize the pros and cons of Cinnamon Extract… And how to best use it for maximum safety and effectiveness. “So How Effective Is Cinnamon For Lowering Blood Sugar & Glucose?…” Out of 50 natural ingredients tested, this popular spice was far and away the best for promoting healthy glucose metabolism. It can also help support healthy cholesterol levels. It works because of Hydroxychalcone, the active ingredient in cinnamon, boosts the effect of insulin by increasing its sensitivity to glucose and facilitating delivery into the cells where it can be stored and synthesized. Additionally, certain compounds in cinnamon inhibit an enzyme that inactivates insulin receptors, further improving cell’s ability to utilize circulating glucose. Here Are The 5 Ways Cinnamon Can Help Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers and antioxidants.” A bioflavonoid found in cinnamon called proanthocyanidin, may alter the insulin-signaling activity in your fat cells and thus, help reduce belly fat. Warnings & Scams If taking raw cinnamon powder (which is found in most supplements), you’ll need a minimum of a 1-2 teaspoons a day or 20 Continue reading >>

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using cinnamon to treat diabetes is something you might have heard of in the last few years. Some diabetics may take cinnamon supplements, while others may just shake the stuff on everything. It’s important to remember that cinnamon is a spice, and all spices can be incredibly beneficial to our health. Not one can save us from anything as serious as diabetes, however adding cinnamon to our foods may offer some benefits to our blood sugar. But how? Why and How Cinnamon May Help During Meals When you eat, your blood glucose rises naturally. This is a normal process in the body, and not harmful … until that insulin doesn’t reach the cells efficiently and your blood glucose stays high all the time. Various reasons can cause this to happen, whether it be too much sugar intake, not enough fiber, too much or any animal protein, a high starchy meal with not enough other nutrients like magnesium and protein to slow down the response, or simply due to blood sugar problems you have currently have. Some other factors that are possible, include a high fat intake from animal or oil fat sources that prevents insulin from reaching the cells, or possibly a diet too low in calories. Skipping meals can also cause problems with blood sugar. Whatever the cause, the important solution is to eat a whole foods diet, lean plant-based proteins, sufficient (but modest) portions of healthy plant-based fats, and as much fiber as your body can tolerate comfortably. Cinnamon works its magic by lowering the insulin response in the body to a degree, and it also contains nutrients that assist in this process as well. Nutrients in Cinnamon That Provide Blood Sugar Support Adding cinnamon to some foods can benefit you for a few reasons. First, it tastes naturally sweet, so it may lower your cravings Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes

Cinnamon For Diabetes

The use of cinnamon to help treat diabetes remains controversial. We know that cinnamon is so good at controlling one’s blood sugar that you can cheat on a diabetes test by consuming two teaspoons of cinnamon the night before your glucose tolerance test. That’s where they make you drink some sugar water to see how well your body can keep your blood sugar levels under control, and if you eat those two teaspoons right when the test starts or 12 hours before you can significantly blunt the spike. Even a teaspoon a day appears to make a significant difference. A review of the best studies done to date found that the intake of cinnamon by type 2 diabetics or prediabetics does lower their blood glucose significantly. So what’s the controversy? Well, as I described in my video The Safer Cinnamon, cassia cinnamon, also known as Chinese cinnamon (probably what you’re getting at the store if it just says “cinnamon”) contains a compound called coumarin which may be toxic to the liver at high doses. Originally the concern was mainly for kids during Christmas-time where they might get an above average exposure, but more recently some researchers suggest that kids just sprinkling some cassia cinnamon on their oatmeal a few times a week might exceed the recommended safety limit. As you can see in my 5-min video Update on Cinnamon for Blood Sugar Control just a quarter teaspoon of cinnamon a few times a week may be too much for little kids, and if they’re eating that cinnamon-sprinkled oatmeal more like every day they can bump up against the limit for adults. So a teaspoon a day of cassia cinnamon might be too much for anyone, but can’t we just switch from cassia cinnamon to Ceylon cinnamon and get the benefits without the potential risks? Without the risks, yes, but we Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Researchers have been investigating a number of powerful natural agents that can help you stabilize your blood sugar, and once again, cinnamon has proven itself as a viable contender in the fight against diabetes, as the study in Diabetic Medicine reveals.(1) One of cinnamon’s most impressive health benefits is its ability to improve blood glucose control. For example, just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day has previously been shown to significantly reduce blood sugar levels, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. (2) The more you can make use of natural therapies such as nutrition and exercise, the better your health will be. However, as helpful as supplements like cinnamon can be, they should not be misconstrued as cures. They are not substitutes for proper diet and lifestyle choices. You cannot properly address your diabetes if you still maintain a sedentary lifestyle and poor dietary choices — cinnamon supplementation or not! How Cinnamon Can Benefit Diabetics Below are five known ways cinnamon can be helpful to your metabolism: 1. Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. (4) 2. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. 3. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. 4. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers a Continue reading >>

Cinnamon

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is best known as a spice, sprinkled on toast and lattes. But extracts from the bark of the cinnamon tree have also been used traditionally as medicine throughout the world. Some research has found that a particular type of cinnamon, cassia cinnamon, may lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. However, other studies have not found a benefit. Studies of cinnamon for lowering cholesterol and treating yeast infections in people with HIV have been inconclusive. Lab studies have found that cinnamon may reduce inflammation, have antioxidant effects, and fight bacteria. But it’s unclear what the implications are for people. For now, studies have been mixed, and it’s unclear what role cinnamon may play in improving health. Because cinnamon is an unproven treatment, there is no established dose. Some recommend 1/2 to 1 teaspoon (2-4 grams) of powder a day. Some studies have used between 1 gram and 6 grams of cinnamon. Very high doses may be toxic. Cinnamon is an additive to countless foods. When purchased in the store, common spice cinnamon could be one of two types or a mixture of both. It is either "true" or Ceylon cinnamon, which is easier to grind but thought to be less effective for diabetes. Or, and more likely, it could be the darker-colored cassia cinnamon. Side effects. Cinnamon usually causes no side effects. Heavy use of cinnamon may irritate the mouth and lips, causing sores. In some people, it can cause an allergic reaction. Applied to the skin, it might cause redness and irritation. Risks. Very high quantities of cassia cinnamon may be toxic, particularly in people with liver problems. Because cinnamon may lower blood sugar, people with diabetes may need to adjust their treatment if they use cinnamon supplements. An ingredient in some cinnamon produc Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course. But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice. For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon. Critchley is a fan of the intense aromatics in cinnamon, especially in Saigon — a cousin of the cassia varieties of cinnamon most commonly used in the U.S. and Europe. And he says adding cinnamon to spice blends is a great way to layer flavors when you're cooking. And when you start to look at the potential health-promoting effects of the spice, there's even more incentive to experiment with it in the kitchen. Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees. It has long been considered a medicinal plant. There are several varieties, harvested from southern China to Southeast Asia. For years, there have been hints that adding cinnamon to your diet can help control blood sugar. And a recent spate of studies adds to the evidence that the effect is real. "Yes, it does work," says Paul Davis, a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis. He authored a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food that concluded that cinnamon lowers fasting blood glucose. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," Davis says. This is about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes drugs, he says. That makes the findings of interest not just to the 25 million Americans who already have diabetes, but also to the 80 million other people — nearly 1 in 4 of u Continue reading >>

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