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How Much Can Metformin Lower Blood Sugar

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

Metformin | Diabetesnet.com

Metformin | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:57 -- Richard Morris Two drugs from the biguanide class, metformin and phenformin, were developed in 1957. Unfortunately, phenformin reached the U.S. market first and resulted in several deaths from lactic acidosis. When this risk surfaced, phenformin was pulled from drugstore shelves worldwide. Metformin was eventually found to be 20 times less likely to cause lactic acidosis, but it was tainted by the history of its cousin. Metformin first became available in France in 1979 and has been widely used in Europe since then, but it was not cleared for use in Type 2 diabetes in the U.S. until 1994. Target Organ: Liver, secondary effects on muscle and fat. Action: Lower glucose production by liver, increase number of insulin receptors Side Effects: bloating, fullness, nausea, cramping, diarrhea, vit B12 deficiency, headache, metallic taste, agitation, lactic acidosis Contraindications: DKA, alcoholism, binge drinking, kidney or liver disease, congestive heart failure, pregnancy, use of contrast media, surgery, heart attack, age > 80 Metformin is a chemical kin to the French lilac plant, which was noted in the early 1900’s to lower the blood sugar. However, French lilac, like phenformin, turned out to be too toxic for use in humans. Metformin, with a much shorter action time than phenformin, has a much lower risk for severe side effects and is quite safe for use by anyone who is otherwise healthy. In fact, in the major UKPDS study, it was the only drug that reduced diabetes-related death rates, heart attacks, and strokes. It should not be used by those who use more than two ounces or two drinks of alcohol a day, who have congestive heart failure, or who have significant kidney, liver, or lung disease. Metformin lowers fasting blood glucose levels by an Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Fortamet Glucophage Glucophage XR Glumetza Riomet Descriptions Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your doctor will teach you what to do if this happens. Metformin does not help patients does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Tablet, Extended Release Solution Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Metformin: Improving Insulin Sensitivity

Metformin: Improving Insulin Sensitivity

Metformin is the only medication in the biguanides category of blood glucose-lowering drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Metformin has been available in the United States since the mid-1990s, when it received FDA approval. You may also know it by its brand name when it was under patent, Glucophage. Metformin is now widely available as a relatively inexpensive generic medication. Metformin’s main action is to decrease the overproduction of glucose by the liver, a common problem in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The action of metformin helps lower blood sugar levels particularly during the night to keep fasting glucose levels under control, but it also helps control blood glucose throughout the day. Metformin also increases the uptake of glucose by your muscles. Overall, metformin decreases insulin resistance and improves insulin sensitivity, thereby helping the insulin your body still makes work more effectively. People with prediabetes and in the early years of type 2 diabetes often continue to make some insulin, just not enough to control blood sugar levels alone. Metformin is not formally approved for use in prediabetes, and any use to treat prediabetes is considered off-label by providers. Since its approval, metformin has become the most commonly recommended blood glucose-lowering medication to treat type 2 diabetes. In recent years it has significantly replaced sulfonylureas, such as glipizide and glyburide. Today both the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) generally recommend that people with type 2 diabetes start taking metformin when they are diagnosed to help treat insulin resistance and maximize insulin s Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Metformin Forever

Metformin Forever

Metformin controls the insulin resistance of people who have type 2 diabetes so well that, if possible, all of us should be taking it. That’s what Roderic Crist, M.D., told me at the annual convention of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians in Denver this weekend. Dr. Crist specializes in family medicine in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. “Not everybody can take every drug,” he added, when I followed up our conversation by calling him at his office after he returned home. “But most of the time people can take metformin if they take it carefully.” Doctors increasingly prescribe it not only for type 2 diabetes but also for insulin resistance, polycystic ovary syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Roughly one-third of Dr. Crist’s patients have diabetes. Well over half, if not two-thirds of the people he sees are insulin resistant. “I treat insulin resistance with that drug even if they aren’t fully diabetic.” he says. “If they have high triglyceride levels and low HDL levels, particularly if they are centrally obese, they should probably be on metformin. It helps slow the progression of the disease from one thing to the next.” But he goes further. He prescribes metformin to almost all of his patients who have type 2 diabetes — no matter how low their A1C level is. And he tells his patients that their levels should be 5.0 or less — not the American Diabetes Association’s less stringent recommendation of 7.0 or less. “If their A1C is at 5, their diabetes is in complete remission. So I have that as a goal.” And he still prescribes metformin to them after they reach that goal. “The two important issues are that it will prevent progression and it should be used in the earliest phases of insulin resistance. We vastly underutilize me Continue reading >>

How Much Does Metformin Actually Help ?

How Much Does Metformin Actually Help ?

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » a lot of people in here are not using metformin and control their blood glucose by diet and excercise alone... wow I was put on metformin right from the start but didn´t actually know anything about anything about diabetes type 2 except from that it had something to do with sugar which diabetics could not eat .... now I think I have managed to get my number in control into the non-diabetic area... but now wonder is metformin doing its job , and how much does metformin in fact help lowering peoples blood glucose... do any of you know more of how much in general metformin does help lowering blood glucose ? I just read this study : but as I read it it seems metformin only lowers blood glucose like something in between 0.6% and 2.0% and in my eyes that is yes ridiculously little... like if one had a raise of blood glucose of 100mmol it would only lower the number by 2.0% and that would leave the person with a number of at least 98mmol then... did I totally misunderstand the results here ... hope so but I am not that clever in reading Scientific texts... but as I read it it seems metformin only lowers blood glucose like something in between 0.6% and 2.0% and in my eyes that is yes ridiculously little... like if one had a raise of blood glucose of 100mmol it would only lower the number by 2.0% and that would leave the person with a number of at least 98mmol then... Hi @Freema , I think you may be interpreting the results wrong here... I'm pretty sure the percentage reference is with respect to the old fashioned HbA1c DCCT units of measurement. So a reduction of 2% is actually huge. 5% (31mmol/mol) = Avg BG 5.4mmol/l; non diabetic 7% (53mmol/mol) = A Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

New Information On How Metformin Works

New Information On How Metformin Works

Not only has new research told us how metformin really works, but a new biomarker was found that can determine the optimal dose of metformin that should be used to get the best results for each patient. Research from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center reveals that the drug most commonly used in Type 2 diabetics who don’t need insulin works on a much more basic level than once thought, treating persistently elevated blood sugar — the hallmark of Type 2 diabetes — by regulating the genes that control its production. investigators say they have zeroed in on a specific segment of a protein called CBP made by the genetic switches involved in overproduction of glucose by the liver that could present new targets for drug therapy of the disease. In healthy people, the liver produces glucose during fasting to maintain normal levels of cell energy production. After people eat, the pancreas releases insulin, the hormone responsible for glucose absorption. Once insulin is released, the liver should turn down or turn off its glucose production, but in people with Type 2 diabetes, the liver fails to sense insulin and continues to make glucose. The condition, known as insulin resistance, is caused by a glitch in the communication between liver and pancreas. Metformin, introduced as frontline therapy for uncomplicated Type 2 diabetes in the 1950s, up until now was believed to work by making the liver more sensitive to insulin. The Hopkins study shows, however, that metformin bypasses the stumbling block in communication and works directly in the liver cells. Senior investigator, Fred Wondisford, M.D., who heads the metabolism division at Hopkins Children’s, tells us that, "Rather than an interpreter of insulin-liver communication, metformin takes over as the messenger itself Continue reading >>

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

In the UK it is common to use Metformin for gestational diabetes where dietary and lifestyle changes are not enough to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels. It is widely used to help lower fasting blood sugar levels as well as post meal levels. Metformin is an oral medication in tablet form. It is used in diabetics to help the body use insulin better by increasing how well the insulin works. In pregnancy it can be used in women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant (Type 2 diabetes) and in women who develop diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Metformin is also used for other conditions too, commonly used in those that have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome). Metformin is a slow release medication. Here are the most commonly asked Q&A on Metformin for gestational diabetes from our Facebook support group Why do I need to take Metformin? For many ladies with gestational or type 2 diabetes, if lower blood sugar levels cannot be reached through diet and exercise then medication will be required to assist. If blood sugar levels remain high, then the diabetes is not controlled and can cause major complications with the pregnancy and baby. Some consultants will prescribe Metformin on diagnosis of gestational diabetes on the basis of your GTT results. Others will let you try diet control first and when blood glucose levels rise out of target range, or close to the target range, they may prescribe Metformin as a way to help lower and control your levels. NICE guidelines regarding the timing and use of Metformin for gestational diabetes 1.2.19 Offer a trial of changes in diet and exercise to women with gestational diabetes who have a fasting plasma glucose level below 7 mmol/litre at diagnosis. [new 2015] 1.2.20 Offer metformin[4] to women with gestational dia Continue reading >>

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