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How Much Blood Sugar Is Too Much

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

12 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

12 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

Most people think only diabetics have high blood sugar levels. Yet this isn’t so. Any person can suffer from this and may not notice the harm being done to nerves, blood vessels, and organs. We at Bright Side are sure that in order to prevent complications, it’s important to recognize worrying symptoms in time and take appropriate measures. High blood sugar prevents glucose from entering cells. As a result, the body doesn’t receive energy and asks for food again and again: it’s a vicious circle. At a high blood sugar level, the body is unable to store and absorb glucose properly. Energy is used inefficiently, and body cells don’t receive the fuel they need. All this leads to the fact that a person often feels tired for no reason. If the blood sugar is too high, the kidneys cannot reabsorb fluid. Therefore, the body, trying to equalize the glucose concentration in the blood and in the cells, dissolves blood with intracellular fluid, thus bringing the concentration of glucose to normal. This results in frequent urination. A dry mouth and strong thirst are responses to severe fluid loss. The hypothalamus, which assesses the level of dehydration and causes thirst, sends a corresponding signal to the brain. Of course, you cannot refuse to drink, but it’s better if you choose water or tea without sugar. With a high glucose level, you can lose weight within a short period of time, even if meals are frequent and contain a lot of calories. There are several reasons for this: Fluid loss due to frequent urination leads to a low fluid level in the whole body, and it results in weight loss. If the insulin level is insufficient for glucose metabolism, the body will switch to fat burning. A large amount of urine at a high level of glucose makes the body spend more calories Continue reading >>

Are The Damages Caused By Eating Too Much Sugar (sweets, Cakes) Reversible If I Have Blood Tests Every Year?

Are The Damages Caused By Eating Too Much Sugar (sweets, Cakes) Reversible If I Have Blood Tests Every Year?

Sugar binds to the cells covalently. That's a fancy way to say pretty much irreversibly. The body tries to regulate glucose and keep it high enough to run your metabolism. Too low and you could shut down. Too high and it starts sticking to blood vessels, nerves and other tissues impairing their function. That damage is cumulative. If you're not diabetic, your body will handle whatever excess glucose you throw at it and convert it to glycogen or fat, thus keeping it regulated. If you're diabetic or have metabolic syndrome (pre diabetes), the story is totally different. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

9 Clear Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

9 Clear Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

How much sugar is too much? iStock/Xristov The World Health Organization recently recommended a sharp drop in sugar intake. Just 5 percent of calories should ideally come from added sugars, the WHO advises; down from 10 percent. This translates to about 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day, or about the amount in one 8-ounce bottle of sweetened lemon iced tea. The average American consumes almost quadruple the WHO recommendation—22 teaspoons of added sugar a day. Watch for these signs you might be eating too much sugar, and then figure out tricks to cut back. Slashing sugar can be tricky because sugar is so ubiquitous—you’ll find it even in healthy-sounding foods like cereal and yogurt. Read ingredient lists and reduce your intake of processed, packaged foods in favor of fresh produce and lean protein. You can also try these secrets people on a low-sugar diet swear by. iStock/Tassii Eating too much sugar can wreak havoc on your skin. A study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests a relationship between a high-sugar diet and the severity of acne. Participants with moderate to severe acne reported a higher sugar intake compared with people who had mild or no acne. Try one of these home remedies to make acne disappear. You feel totally wiped iStock/ridvan If you eat breakfast or lunch packed with sneaky sugar and distinctly lacking in satiating protein, fiber, and fat—say, a jumbo bagel with jelly—you could find yourself stuck in a mean afternoon energy slump. You might develop a pounding headache or an urge to cuddle up in bed. A balanced and nutritious diet prevents your blood sugar from going from a sugary high to a lethargic low. Try these tricks to undo a sugar binge. Your dentist has bad news iStock/shironosov Cavities have always bee Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Taking care of your blood sugar is one of the most valuable things you can do for your mood, weight, and even your heart health. It’s essential for keeping your body’s chemicals (a.k.a. your hormones) in check and also helps stabilize your appetite. If you’re having a hard time finding some balance with your blood sugar, and constantly hungry no matter what, or jittery and shaky, then it’s time to turn to some tips for taking care of your blood sugar ASAP! Surprisingly, it’s not just the sugary white stuff that raises your blood sugar, and not even the fruit in your diet like some might say. It can also be caused by other factors that you’ll want to be aware of when going throughout your day. Your blood sugar really boils down to your insulin (the sugar hormone, as many call it), which also stores fat and secrets glucose into the cells. Your insulin isn’t your enemy when you care for it. It can help keep your energy stable, but the key is to slow it down for a steady walk, not send it on a rollercoaster ride. Here are some things you might not realize affect your blood sugar: 1. Too Much Caffeine Caffeine also raises insulin when consumed in excess. While a cup (or even two cups) of coffee a day is actually beneficial for your insulin, more than that can cause it to sky-rocket. Even when consumed from healthier sources like yerba mate or black tea, caffeine can make your insulin surge, which leaves you moody, shaky, irritable, and craving sweets. Then you become tired and exhausted when levels drop, which leads you to reach for more caffeine or more sugar, depending on your vice. See how to Eat Your Way to Energy: No Caffeine Needed here if you need some help, or these 14 Natural Caffeine-Free Choices to Help Mellow You Out if you’re stressed. 2. Sugar W Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Part 1 of 8 What is blood sugar? Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, comes from the food you eat. Your body creates blood sugar by digesting some food into a sugar that circulates in your bloodstream. Blood sugar is used for energy. The sugar that isn’t needed to fuel your body right away gets stored in cells for later use. Too much sugar in your blood can be harmful. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that is characterized by having higher levels of blood sugar than what is considered within normal limits. Unmanaged diabetes can lead to problems with your heart, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. The more you know about how eating affects blood sugar, the better you can protect yourself against diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it’s important to know how eating affects blood sugar. Part 2 of 8 Your body breaks down everything you eat and absorbs the food in its different parts. These parts include: carbohydrates proteins fats vitamins and other nutrients The carbohydrates you consume turn into blood sugar. The more carbohydrates you eat, the higher the levels of sugar you will have released as you digest and absorb your food. Carbohydrates in liquid form consumed by themselves are absorbed more quickly than those in solid food. So having a soda will cause a faster rise in your blood sugar levels than eating a slice of pizza. Fiber is one component of carbohydrates that isn’t converted into sugar. This is because it can’t be digested. Fiber is important for health, though. Protein, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals don’t contain carbohydrates. These components won’t affect your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, your carbohydrate intake is the most important part of your diet to consider when it comes to managing your blood sugar levels. Part 3 Continue reading >>

What's The Fastest/best Way To Quickly Decrease Blood Sugar?

What's The Fastest/best Way To Quickly Decrease Blood Sugar?

Is that fasting blood sugar? If it is, it should be well below 100. Anything above 85 mg/dl and your health risks increase dramatically. For example at more than 85 mg/dl fasting blood sugar levels, your risks of a cardiac disease increase by as much as 40% ! The first thing to do is obviously to meet your family physician or a diabetologist. If he or she prescribes anti-diabetic (blood sugar lowering) medication, I suggest you start with it. But you can look for natural options to control your blood sugar levels. Natural herbs like Gymnema sylvestre and spices like cinnamon and many other such supplements can help in reducing your blood sugar, reducing insulin resistance as well as strengthening the pancreas to function effectively. Continue reading >>

How To Bring Down High Blood Sugar Levels

How To Bring Down High Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Having high blood sugar levels can be discomforting and many people wish to know what they can do to help to bring down high blood glucose levels. We look at some of the options for lowering blood glucose in the short term. High blood sugar is commonly known as hyperglycemia. What are the signs of high blood sugar? The classic symptoms of high blood glucose levels are: Feeling very thirsty Needing to go the toilet often Having a dry mouth Feeling tired/lethargic Feeling uncomfortable and irritable Check your blood sugar If you have take medication that may cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), it’s highly advisable to check your blood sugar levels before you try to bring your sugar levels down. This is just in case your blood sugar is normal or low, which can be the case in some situations. Testing of blood sugar before bringing your levels down is particularly important if you take insulin. When to call for medical advice It is important to note that very high blood glucose levels can be dangerous and it is important to be aware of the symptoms and risk factors of the following conditions: Diabetic ketoacidosis - a short term complication most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic State - a short term complication most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes If you are struggling to keep your blood glucose levels under control, speak to your GP or consultant who can advise you or refer you onto a diabetes education course. Correcting high blood sugar levels with insulin If you take insulin, one way to reduce blood sugar is to inject insulin. However, be careful as insulin can take 4 hours or longer to be fully absorbed, so you need to make sure you take into account how much insulin you may already have in your body that is yet t Continue reading >>

If You Are Borderline Diabetic, How Much Sugar Can You Have Per Day?

If You Are Borderline Diabetic, How Much Sugar Can You Have Per Day?

Being borderline diabetic, known as “prediabetic,” means that you’ll want to carefully start monitoring your sugar intake. Too much sugar can lead to weight gain, making it harder for you to manage your blood sugar level, which further increases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Not all sugar-containing foods are equally problematic, however; it’s the foods with added sugar you want to limit. Video of the Day Sugar comes in two forms in foods: natural or added. Natural sugar, like lactose from milk, isn’t your big concern if you’re prediabetic. Foods with natural sugars also give you fiber, protein and other beneficial nutrients. It’s products that are full of added sugar that you want to avoid. These foods, including baked goods, don’t typically have much to offer other than a lot of sugar and a lot of calories. The sugar grams listed on the label include both natural and added sugar, however. Read through the ingredients list to figure out if sugars have been added. Sucrose, dextrose, high-fructose corn syrup and maltose are just some of the added sugar terms you’ll see and should avoid. While no exact sugar recommendation for prediabetics exists, the World Health Organization recommends limiting your added sugar intake to less than 5 percent of your caloric intake. This means that if 2,000 calories a day is about your average, you shouldn’t have more than 100 calories from added sugar. Because carbohydrates contain 4 calories per gram, this amounts to a maximum of 25 grams of added sugar per day. Sugar, being a carbohydrate, takes up some of your total carb allotment for the day. While your specific carbohydrate needs may vary, generally getting 45 to 60 grams at each meal is a starting point for managing diabetes, the American Diabetes Ass Continue reading >>

Are High Blood Sugar Levels Seen In Diabetes The Result Of Too Much Gluconeogenesis?

Are High Blood Sugar Levels Seen In Diabetes The Result Of Too Much Gluconeogenesis?

That is correct, in part. In Type 2 diabetics, most of the extra glucose comes from meals, is not absorbed by muscles, because of insulin resistance and remains circulating. There are, however, other effects of insulin in the body, and, as you mention, inhibiting gluconeogenesis and liver glucogenolysis. A doctor will use a log of the variation in glucose levels throughout the day, along with a meal log to determine the exact cause of hyperglycemia. A high blood glucose level during the morning, without a large meal the night before usually indicates glucogenolysis is a factor in hyperglycemia. The doctor can then prescribe metformin, which reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis and glucogenolysis. Continue reading >>

Why Did Pain Evolve, When Most Life Forms Can Survive Without It?

Why Did Pain Evolve, When Most Life Forms Can Survive Without It?

Consider this as an example: (GRAPHIC PICTURE AHEAD) This is gangrene — tissue death due to infection. Gangrene is common in uncontrolled/untreated diabetics who suffer loss of sensations including pain due to high blood sugar levels (a condition named peripheral neuropathy). A tiny cut to the skin, an ulcer, or a shoe bite will quickly escalate to aninfection and tissue death, often requiring amputation. Do you know why? Because in the absence of feedback, which the rest of us have in the form of pain, they remain oblivious of the wound. Repeated injury occurs leading to catastrophic consequences. Ask them how they feel about the importance of pain. Pain is central to our survival. Pain is protective. Pain warrants caution and behavorial change. The coffee is too hot, don't drink it! The bath water is burning, adjust the temperature! Sprained an ankle, broke a bone? Don't apply too much pressure. Take some rest. Let it heal. All of this and much more is possible only and only because of pain. Pain keeps us from accidentally killing ourselves. Pain is very, very important. Continue reading >>

Too Much Sugar Causes Alzheimer's: Unprecedented Study Reveals 'tipping Point' Link Between Blood Glucose And Brain Disease

Too Much Sugar Causes Alzheimer's: Unprecedented Study Reveals 'tipping Point' Link Between Blood Glucose And Brain Disease

A diet high in sugar could lead to Alzheimer's, a new study has warned. Unprecedented research has revealed the 'tipping point' at which blood sugar levels become so dangerous they allow the neurological disease to take hold. Once levels pass the threshold, they restrict the performance of a vital protein, which normally fights the brain inflammation associated with dementia. The study by the University of Bath and King's College London builds on previous research showing diabetes appears to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. But this is the first concrete evidence to explain why abnormally high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia, have an impact on cognitive function. 'Excess sugar is well known to be bad for us when it comes to diabetes and obesity, but this potential link with Alzheimer's disease is yet another reason that we should be controlling our sugar intake in our diets,' said Dr Omar Kassaar from the University of Bath. In Alzheimer's abnormal proteins aggregate to form plaques and tangles in the brain which progressively damage the brain and lead to severe cognitive decline. Previous studies established glucose and its break-down products can damage proteins in cells via a reaction called glycation but the specific molecular link between glucose and Alzheimer's was not understood. But now scientists have unraveled that link by using brain samples of 30 patients with and without Alzheimer's and tested them for protein glycation, a modification caused by high glucose levels in the blood. They discovered in the early stages of Alzheimer's glycation damages an enzyme called MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) which plays a role in immune response and insulin regulation. MIF is involved in the response of brain c Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Photo: Pond5 Loading your diet with fruit seems like a no-brainer, right? Your body gets a boost from nutritious superstars like fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, plus juicy berries might even satisfy your sweet tooth. But that doesn’t mean maintaining a 24/7 fruit free-for-all is good for your health. “Fruit is high in a sugar known as fructose. Even though the sugar is coming from this healthy source, you still have to use moderation,” says Brigitte Zeitlin, MPH, RD, CDN, a dietitian at B-Nutritious. If you’re panicking because you’ve been devouring fruit salad to your heart’s content, don’t worry. Here’s what you need to know about how much fruit you should really be eating every day. Why Eating Too Much Fruit Might Impact Your Health Sugar comes in a few different forms: Glucose, fructose and sucrose. Glucose helps keep all your systems chugging along smoothly. “Carbohydrates break down into glucose, your body’s main source of fuel,” says Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN, registered dietitian and author of Living a Real Life with Real Food. Then you have fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. It’s metabolized in the liver, as opposed to in the blood stream. Sucrose, more commonly known as table sugar, is simply a combination of both glucose and fructose. High blood sugar, which is caused by too much glucose in your blood, can lead to diabetes. Refined carbohydrates, like white rice or white-flour baked goods, are common culprits leading to high blood sugar. In addition to their sugar content, they lack the fiber that prevents glucose spikes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar levels. “Too much sugar in the blood stream at once leads to fat storage and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes,” says Zeitlin. The lesser-known Continue reading >>

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