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How Much Blood Sugar Drops After Exercise

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

If you’re like me, you might have a health-focused New Year’s resolution posted on your wall: "lose weight," "exercise more, "be less stressed." Unfortunately, making resolutions is easy, but sticking to them is hard. A 15,000-person survey found that four out of five people who make New Year’s resolutions eventually break them. And it gets worse: a sizeable percentage of people (11%) in one survey actually broke their resolution one week in! As I pondered this depressing data, I thought about scientifically testing the simplest, most fundamental exercise possible: walking. It can be done anywhere, does not cost anything, and requires no equipment. And because the barriers to doing it are so low, it also helps address that very basic New Year’s Resolution conundrum outlined above. What follows is my personal diabetes experience testing the blood sugar benefits of walking, a brief review of studies on diabetes and walking, and five tips to incorporate walking into your daily routine. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! Walking with diabetes – my own experience As a fitness fiend my whole life, I tend to think of “exercise” with a very intense, all-or-nothing frame of reference: cycling, strength training, and playing basketball. So when I approached the question of how much walking could really drop my blood sugars, I was skeptical. In an effort to test it objectively, I performed a dozen periods of walking, and measured my blood glucose immediately before and immediately after finishing. I timed each walk with a stopwatch, always made sure I had less than one unit of insulin-on-board, and tried to go at a normal speed. On average, walking dropped my blood sugar by approximately one mg/dl per minute. The la Continue reading >>

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? Don’t Exercise Till You Read This!

Small losses, big gains "Because most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight, meal planning and physical activity usually focus on gradual weight loss, something on the order of two to three pounds per month, " says Paris Roach, MD, an endocrinologist with Indiana University Health and the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Indiana University School of Medicine. "Exercise is beneficial to metabolism independent of weight loss in that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance," says Dr. Roach. Just a five to ten percent reduction from your starting weight can have significant effects on blood glucose levels. That's good news if you haven't broken a sweat in a while. In addition, you'll also gain muscle strength, improve cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, balance, stamina, mood and overall good feeling. This workout normalizes blood sugar for type 2 diabetics. Keep an eye on blood sugar Exercise will not only help control blood sugar levels but also help you shed weight and keep your heart healthy. It's important you keep an eye on your blood sugar because any physical activity makes you more sensitive to insulin. "When you exercise, your body becomes more efficient at using insulin and this can lower blood sugar, both during exercise and up to 24 hours after," says Mark Heyman, clinical psychologist, certified diabetes educator, and vice-president of Clinical Operations and Innovation at One Drop, a mobile app that educates and coaches diabetics. Because blood sugar can drop dangerously low, check it before you exercise and again if you feel light-headed or weak during exercise, he says. "If your blood sugar is low (below 70mg/dl), eat 15 grams of simple carbohydrates, such as orange juice, glucose tablets or candy," says Dr. H Continue reading >>

An Easy Walk Lowers Blood Sugar Level

An Easy Walk Lowers Blood Sugar Level

We’ve learned through experience and the advice of experts that a healthy life can require bypassing whole aisles of temptations in the grocery store while forcing ourselves to work out on a regular basis in a gym. But it doesn’t have to cost us so much sweat or demand superhuman supermarket discipline. Research reveals that an easy walk after a meal can do wonders for our blood sugar curve. And that’s not all. Very mild activity appears to work as well as a more intensive workout. “Just getting up and walking about is enough to prevent a rise in blood sugar considerably, in fact as much as medicines designed to curb high blood sugar levels,” says Professor Arne Torbjørn Høstmark. He has conducted a number of studies on this surprisingly little discussed phenomenon. The studies have been carried out at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences and the University of Oslo and a number of researchers has been involved. “You’d expect this advice to be included in lots of textbooks, but unfortunately it isn’t,” he says. High blood sugar levels are common A certain increase in blood sugar after a meal is perfectly natural. Digestion turns the carbohydrates we eat into glucose sugar, which is carried to the cells in our body by the circulatory system. Glucose is the fuel that powers all our cells. The hormone insulin opens the cells in muscles and other tissue so that the sugar can be extracted from the blood and let in where it’s needed. But sometimes this mechanism doesn’t work as it should. For many people, especially those with diabetes 2, the cells don’t open effectively enough and blood sugar levels can rocket into the stratosphere after a meal. This can be rough on the body. Frequent instances of elevated blood sugar levels can increase the risk o Continue reading >>

What’s Better For Lowering Blood Sugar? A Walk Before Or After Eating?

What’s Better For Lowering Blood Sugar? A Walk Before Or After Eating?

Should I walk before or after eating?” A walk, no matter when you take it, will generally lower blood sugar (glucose) levels. But because there are many variables involved, it is difficult to say exactly how much a person’s blood glucose will drop. These variables include walking intensity and walking duration, as well as the quantity and type of food that you’re eating. Instead of asking, “Should I walk before or after eating?” a better question for people with diabetes or prediabetes to ask is: “What is my blood sugar before and after exercise, and is it safe to exercise?” Is it safe to exercise? As a general rule: Avoid exercising if fasting glucose levels are greater than 250 mg/dL and if ketosis is present. Use caution if glucose levels are less than 300 mg/dL and if no ketosis is present. Ketosis is a metabolic process your body undergoes when it doesn’t have enough carbohydrates (glucose) from food for energy. Symptoms of ketosis include: Breath that smells fruity or like nail polish or nail polish remover Rapid breathing or shortness of breath Excessive thirst Frequent urination Stomach pain Nausea, vomiting Fatigue, weakness Confusion Ingest added carbohydrates, such as whole fresh fruit, if glucose levels are less than 100 mg/dL before exercise. Identify when changes in insulin or food intake are necessary. Learn your glycemic response to different exercise conditions (exercise time and intensity). Consume added carbohydrate as needed to avoid hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Carbohydrate-based foods (again, fresh fruit is a great choice) should be readily available during and after exercise. Take life to the next level, and be all that you can be. That's what a vacation at Pritikin is all about. Live better. Look better. Best of all, feel bette Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

The Impact Of Brief High-intensity Exercise On Blood Glucose Levels

Go to: Abstract Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG), but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE) protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up) of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels of people with and without diabetes is reviewed. Results Six studies of nondiabetics (51 males, 14 females) requiring 7.5 to 20 minutes/week of HIE are reviewed. Two weeks of sprint interval training increased insulin sensitivity up to 3 days postintervention. Twelve weeks near maximal interval running (total exercise time 40 minutes/week) improved BG to a similar extent as running at 65% VO2max for 150 minutes/week. Eight studies of diabetics (41 type 1 and 22 type 2 subjects) were reviewed. Six were of a single exercise session with 44 seconds to 13 minutes of HIE, and the others were 2 and 7 weeks duration with 20 and 2 minutes/week HIE, respectively. With type 1 and 2 diabetes, BG was generally higher during and up to 2 hours after HIE compared to controls. With type 1 diabetics, BG decreased from midnight to 6 AM following HIE the previous morning. With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for 24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at 48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%. Conclusion Very brief HIE improves BG 1 to 3 days postexercise in both diabetics and non-diabetics. HIE is unlikely to cause hypoglycemia during and immediately after exercise. Larger and longer randomized studies are needed to determine the safety, acceptability, long-term efficacy, and optimal exerc Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes: Low Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hypoglycemia means that your blood sugar is low and your body (especially your brain) is not getting enough fuel. Your blood sugar can go too low if you take too much insulin, miss a meal, or take too much of your other diabetes medicine. A snack or drink with sugar in it will raise your blood sugar and should ease your symptoms right away. What are the symptoms of low blood sugar? Watch for these early signs of low blood sugar: • You have nausea. • You are hungry. • You feel nervous, cranky, or shaky. • You have cold, clammy, wet skin. • You sweat when you are not exercising. • You have a fast heartbeat. • You feel confused. • You feel anxious. If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night include: • Restlessness. • Making unusual noises. • Trying to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. • Sleepwalking. • Nightmares. • Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. How do you prevent low blood sugar? • Themost important way to prevent low blood sugar is to test your blood sugar level often each day and to follow your doctor's instructions. It is especially important to check at times when your blood sugar has been low in the past. • Eat small meals more often so that you do not get too hungry between meals. Do not skip meals. • Balance extra exercise with eating more. Not everyone will have low blood sugar right after exercise. Check your blood sugar and learn how it changes after exercise. If your blood sugar stays at a normal level, you may not nee Continue reading >>

Sport And Blood Sugar Levels

Sport And Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet When people with diabetes participate in sport, whether they are children or adults, it is quite possible that they will experience low or high blood sugar levels. If you are on blood glucose lowering medication (e.g. tablets or insulin) it is recommend to more frequently test your blood glucose levels during and after exercise to see how your sugar levels are responding. Be wary of hypos Low blood sugar, hypoglycemia, can occur during or after exercise when the body has used a high level of its stored sugar (glycogen). People taking glucose lowering medications should be aware of the risk of hypoglycemia that sport can present. Sport can cause the body to be more sensitive to insulin for up to 48 hours after exercising and people on insulin may need to take this account, particularly when next going to sleep after exercise to avoid hypos during the night. Hyperglycemia and sport High blood sugar, hyperglycemia, can also occur during exercise, particularly after short bursts of strenuous activity. Strenuous activity produces a stress response which sees the body producing glucagon to raise blood sugar levels to provide the muscles with energy in the form of glucose. Exercise is beneficial for the body but requires some care if you are at risk of hypos. If you take medication that can lead to hypoglycemia, it is important to test your blood glucose levels before, during and after exercise. People may respond in different ways to different types of exercise. Researchers have found that intensive exercise in people with type 1 diabetes can sometimes lead to an initial sharp rise in blood glucose levels. However, intensive and non-intensive exercise may often lead to low blood glucose levels in some people. It is important therefore to test your blood sugar levels at Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise: Is Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia Threatening?

Low Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise: Is Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia Threatening?

Hypoglycemia is the term used for defining low blood sugar levels, and when we’re talking about non-diabetic hypoglycemia, we refer to below normal values of blood sugar that occur in people who aren’t affected by diabetes. The symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from one person to another, and can be accentuated by certain factors such as the lack of sleep, fasting or dehydration. Triggers of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic people can be very different, but today we’ll only discuss about exercise-induced low blood sugar levels, and we’ll try to understand why this symptom occurs, how threatening it is and how it can be prevented and managed. Exercise can decrease one’s blood sugar levels, but in healthy people the hypoglycemic episode is only temporary. If you constantly experience low blood sugar levels after or during exercise, it may be wise to schedule an appointment with your doctor and get tested for diabetes. Problems with the adrenal and pituitary glands, as well as liver problems, may also trigger hypoglycemic episodes, so it’s important to exclude any potential health issue from the list. Back to exercise-induced hypoglycemia: you probably experienced it several times after strenuous exercise, so the symptoms may sound very familiar. Hypoglycemia manifests through dizziness, headaches, inability to focus, shaking, sweating, blurred vision, irregular heartbeats, and even loss of coordination, anxiety and seizures if you don’t restore the glycogen reservoirs fast after the first symptoms occur. Why do these manifestations appear when exercising? Your body relies on glucose as its main fuel, so this form of sugar is the first one used by the organism for producing energy during exercise. The muscles and brain require glucose to function properly, and gl Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may discourage some with T1DM from exercising. Children and youth may be embarrassed by the temporary reduction in coordination and physical performance associated with hypoglycemia and by the fear of letting teammates down while playing. Some parents may discourage their children from normal participation in physical activity and from playing competitive sports because of concern about severe hypoglycemia. However, this fear may reduce a child’s physical activity, which may lead to reduced overall health, reduced enjoyment from exercise, and restricted confidence in meeting the demands imposed by living with a chronic health condition like diabetes. As a result, long-term exercise habits as well as personal growth and psycho-social development may be blunted. Concern with hypoglycemia from exercise is probably even more heightened in those with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of symptoms during hypoglycemia. However, some of these concerns might be allayed by the realization that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugars rather than lower it. The fact that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugar appears to be relatively unknown to many with T1DM. However, the effect has been confirmed in a number of studies. These studies have identified an exercise threshold that elicits this response. The threshold exercise intensity occurs at or above 80% of a person’s maximum exercis Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

What is hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose)? Hypoglycaemia or low blood glucose is a condition in which the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood, drops below a certain point (about 2.5mmol/l). The condition manifests itself by a number of symptoms that usually disappear 10 to 15 minutes after eating sugar. People differ slightly in the exact level of blood glucose at which they begin to feel symptoms of low blood sugar. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and helps the cells in the body absorb glucose from the blood. Normally, the glucose level rises after a meal. Too much insulin in the blood and other diseases can cause hypoglycaemic episodes (also known as 'hypos'). What can cause hypoglycaemic episodes in non-diabetic patients? Too much insulin in the blood: reactive hypoglycaemia (see below) a tumour – very often benign – in the insulin-producing pancreas. This is a very rare condition indeed Other diseases: a disease in the adrenal glands (Addison's disease) a weakened pituitary gland a severe reduction in liver function patients who have had their stomach removed fasting, malnutrition Reactive hypoglycaemia is possibly the most common reason for hypoglycaemia in non-diabetics but is often overdiagnosed. This form of hypoglycaemia is probably caused by an overproduction of insulin from the pancreas after a large meal with a lot of carbohydrates. The insulin can still be detected even after several hours, although the level should be back to normal at this time. This condition is probably most common in overweight people and those with Type 2 diabetes, where the large demand for insulin can sometimes cause too much insulin to be produced in the pancreas. There is some evidence to suggest that reactive hypoglycaemia can precede Type 2 diabetes. What happ Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Type 1 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Type 1 Diabetes

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1968, at the age of 8 years old. At the time, there were no fingerstick blood sugars available for use. One had to regulate diabetes by measuring urine sugars, a very imprecise way to monitor blood sugar control. I recently obtained copies of my medical records from that 12-day stay, and found the following comment in the discharge summary: “He had one mild episode of shocking without loss of consciousness or convulsion.” I remember that episode. I could not have known that it was to be the first of hundreds of low blood sugar reactions that I would experience over the next 46 years. Though a hypoglycemia episode is always disruptive and never a pleasant experience, most were mild, ones that I could treat myself. But occasionally they were severe, requiring assistance from family or co-workers, or 911 calls. I was driven to achieve ‘tight control’ and prevent the long-term complications of diabetes, which I have managed to do. But there was a high price. I felt like I was playing a game of Russian roulette with hypoglycemia. I could no longer tell when I was low. Hypoglycemia unawareness had developed. I was fortunate enough to have developed T1D at a time when treatment for it has steadily improved. I started on an insulin pump in January 1982, and that helped me to reduce my frequency of hypoglycemia. The availability of insulin glargine (Lantus) and insulin detemir (Levemir) were great advances over older basal insulins (NPH, lente, ultralente) that had more intense and less predictable peaks, a very real problem at night. While I have not used them, because they became available after I started on a pump, better basal insulins have helped many T1Ds reduce night time hypoglycemia. Faster insulins (insulin lispro/Humalog Continue reading >>

Exercise For Diabetes Control

Exercise For Diabetes Control

By the dLife Editors In case you haven’t heard: Exercise is really good for people with type 2 diabetes. It helps control blood sugar levels, increases energy levels, improves heart health, and promotes emotional well-being. Barring other medical complications, the majority of people with diabetes can and should exercise for diabetes control and for better overall health and well-being. How does exercise lower blood sugar? Exercise lowers blood sugar in two ways: First, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. This means that your cells are better able to use available insulin to absorb sugar from the bloodstream to be used as energy for your body. Second, exercise stimulates another mechanism that allows your muscles to absorb and use sugar for energy, even without insulin. Not only does exercise lower blood sugar levels in the short term, but exercising over time also contributes to lower A1C levels over time. How important is exercise? Leading a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and the high incidence of obesity and overweight among people with type 2 is also highly correlated with inactivity. Starting a workout program can lower body mass and consequently decrease the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who exercise regularly have better A1c profiles than those who don’t. Along with medical nutrition therapy, exercise is one of the first lines of defense in type 2 diabetes control. In addition, exercise is a key tool in preventing one of the leading complications of type 2 diabetes—cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that regular activity lowers triglyceride levels and blood pressure. How much exercise do you need? The American Diabetes Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Hypoglycemia During Exercise

How To Avoid Hypoglycemia During Exercise

Exercise is excellent for people with diabetes—both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes—but you have to be careful about hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is when your blood glucose level (your blood sugar level) drops too low. To avoid hypoglycemia during exercise, you should learn to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia while you are exercising. Also, you can test your blood sugar before, during, and after exercise. How You Can Become Hypoglycemic when Exercising When you exercise, your body needs more energy than it normally does (that certainly makes sense—you’re expending more energy than you normally do). That extra energy comes from the sugar—the glucose—your body stores. When you exercise, you speed up your metabolism and use up the glucose in your bloodstream faster. That’s right: Exercise makes it easier for your body to use glucose, whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, making exercise incredibly beneficial for people with diabetes. However, it is possible to burn too much glucose—making your blood glucose level drop too low, which is hypoglycemia. If your blood glucose level drops, your body detects that it is exhausting its energy supply. It will start to pull sugar supplies from your fat, muscles, and other body tissues. This can be dangerous, especially if your body is starved enough for sugar to make you faint. How to Avoid Hypoglycemia During Exercise To avoid hypoglycemia, you will need to learn what generally works for you when you exercise; you’ll need to pay attention to your body and how it reacts to different types of exercise and levels of intensity. Because your body does not always respond the same way to exercise and activity, you will need to be prepared for emergencies, too. Good rules of thumb for avoiding hypogl Continue reading >>

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