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How Much Are Blood Sugar Test Strips

Test Strips For Blood Glucose Monitors Are Not Always Accurate

Test Strips For Blood Glucose Monitors Are Not Always Accurate

Self-monitoring of blood glucose is essential for managing diabetes. Over 30 different blood glucose monitors cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are available to consumers. The FDA relies solely on data provided by manufacturers for clearance. Few physicians or diabetic patients are aware that blood glucose monitor test strips that are exposed to humidity and/or excessive temperature give falsely elevated results. Manufacturers know this, and the information they provide to patients obfuscates the problem; furthermore, the FDA does not require the reporting of environmental effects on accuracy. On more than one occasion, I administered excessive insulin based on results from the last few test strips from vials of 50 that had been opened for <1 month. I determined that the test strips were inaccurate by comparing them to new ones using glucose control solutions. I contacted the manufacturer, but representatives would provide no data on environmental effects. A Medline search showed no studies on this subject. Health Devices evaluates blood glucose monitors periodically but has never performed environmental testing. The FDA requires manufacturers to report whenever they become aware of information that reasonably suggests that one of its devices 1) has or may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or 2) has malfunctioned and that the device or a similar device marketed by the manufacturer would be likely to cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if the malfunction were to recur. This information is available at the FDA website in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Database (MAUDE) (1). A search showed 691 reports for the test strips and 316 for the blood glucose monitor I used, many from health care provider Continue reading >>

How Can I Use A Blood Sugar Monitor Without Strips?

How Can I Use A Blood Sugar Monitor Without Strips?

This technology of monitoring blood glucose without the strips has not yet been introduced which means your blood glucose levels can only be monitored when you put the sample on the strip which then measures the exact readings. However, in India, an upcoming technology for monitoring sugar levels offers a smart glucometer which attached conveniently to your smartphone and sends your readings directly to a diabetes educator. Easy to carry due to a compact size, this smartphone based glucometer acts your ready to go diabetes management device anytime, anywhere. Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetic Test Strips Cost? Our New Pricecheck Project

How Much Do Diabetic Test Strips Cost? Our New Pricecheck Project

Summary: Managing chronic conditions like diabetes can be costly, even if you have insurance. We’re starting a segment in our PriceCheck project to crowdsource the price of a common diabetic supply, the test strip. This is the fourth item in our PriceCheck series; the first three were mammograms, MRI’s, and IUD’s. You can not only share on our PriceCheck page, but also search to see the results of our data collection, and you can find the three partners’ blog posts here on our collective page, or join our community on our Facebook page. Diabetes relates to the way your body uses blood sugar or glucose. If you have diabetes, either Type 1 or Type 2, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, and that can lead to complications. (Here’s a nice Mayo Clinic explainer on diabetes.) Experts say 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and as many as 79 million have prediabetes. The worst complications of diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, eye damage (which can lead to blindness), foot disease (which can lead to amputation) and other ills. To make their treatments clear, diabetics commonly measure their blood glucose level with a meter and a test strip. That testing level tells whether their glucose levels are in range or not, and thus whether they need to use medications. The test strip has chemicals that react with the glucose in the blood; each strip is used and then discarded. Prices for test strips (the white strip in the picture) can vary widely, from $87.99 for a box of 50 Accu-Check Smartview strips at Walgreens, to $49.99 for a box of 100 Walgreens brand strips at Walgreens — or, if your insurance covers them, perhaps you get them at no charge. We have heard prices ranging from 25 cents to $1 per test strip, which adds up quickly. Ou Continue reading >>

2 Ways You Could Save On Blood Sugar Test Strips

2 Ways You Could Save On Blood Sugar Test Strips

Blood sugar testing is a way to keep track of how well diabetes is being managed. Test results help to show how food, physical activity and diabetes medications affect blood sugar. The number of blood sugar tests a person with diabetes may do varies. It depends on the treatment plan. Some people test their blood sugar several times a day. Others test less often. Sometimes extra tests may be needed, such as when starting a new medication or adjusting an insulin dose. Every blood sugar test uses a test strip. Every box of strips usually comes with a cost–typically a 20% co-insurance payment after the Part B deductible. It could be tempting to skip tests if strips start to cost too much. Medicare understands how important regular testing is to diabetes self-management. There is now a competitive bidding process that helps Medicare select suppliers that meet its standards for the quality and cost of diabetic supplies. Here are two ways that you can get the blood sugar test strips you need at the lower cost that Medicare’s competitive bidding process offers. 1. Order blood sugar test strips from a Medicare contracted mail-order supplier. Medicare has a mail-order program for diabetic testing supplies. Medicare sets the amount it will pay based on bids from suppliers. Contracted suppliers may not charge you more than 20% co-insurance on the Medicare-approved amount. You can enter your zip code to find a supplier on the Medicare web site. Check the box for “Mail-Order Diabetic Supplies,” then scroll down and click the Search button. You’ll get a list of contracted suppliers. You’ll need to check each supplier to see which ones carry what you need. You can usually transfer your prescription to any supplier. Test strips or other diabetic supplies you order can then b Continue reading >>

Blood-sugar Test Kits And Test Strips: Best Sellers

Blood-sugar Test Kits And Test Strips: Best Sellers

How do blood sugar test kits and test strips work? For individuals with diabetes, monitoring one's blood sugar levels to ensure that they are in the correct range is pivotal to controlling symptoms, pain and avoiding long-term complications that may arise from poor blood sugar levels. Blood sugar test kits and test strips are invaluable in helping diabetes sufferers plan meals, activities and what times of day to take medications to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Additionally, these test kits are vital for patients to quickly respond to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) states when they arise. The first blood glucose meters were developed in the 1980s that measured blood glucose by using an enzyme to convert the glucose in a drop of blood into a proportional amount of dye, which was then measured by a beam of light projected onto the test spot. By detecting how much of the light was absorbed in the dye, this could reveal an accurate level of blood glucose present. However, today's test strips utilize a process called electrochemistry, which still employ an enzyme in the test strip, but instead of using dye, the glucose will experience a chemical reaction that will convert it into an electrical current. This current will provide an accurate reading of glucose concentration in the blood and can be read easily by a blood glucose meter (also known as a glucometer) to assess the patient's current blood sugar levels. Who should test blood sugar levels? Testing blood sugar levels is an essential practice for patients who are managing their diabetes to examine how their treatment is progressing, assessing how diet, exercise, illness and stress affect blood sugar levels and the efficacy of diabetes medications. Blood sugar testing practic Continue reading >>

What Are The Indicators To Check Up The Blood Sugar Of Type 1 Diabetics? How Often Should A Diabetic Check Their Blood Glucose Level Within A Day?

What Are The Indicators To Check Up The Blood Sugar Of Type 1 Diabetics? How Often Should A Diabetic Check Their Blood Glucose Level Within A Day?

Blood glucose monitoring can help keep diabetes under control. The following symptoms may be the first signs of type 1 diabetes. They may also occur when blood sugar is high. Excessive thirst and hunger Fatigue, feeling tired all the time Blurry eyesight Feeling numbness or tingling in your feet Losing weight even without trying Frequent urination Methods of Monitoring Glucose Blood glucose monitoring using a glucometer gives a direct measure of the glucose concentration at the time of the test. After washing your hands, insert a test strip into your meter. Use your lancing device on the side of your fingertip to get a drop of blood. Touch and hold the edge of the test strip to the drop of blood, and wait for the result. Your blood glucose level will appear on the meter's display. All meters are slightly different, so always refer to your user's manual for specific instructions. Keep a record of your blood sugar for yourself and your health care team. These numbers will help if you have problems managing your diabetes. You and your doctor should set a target goal for your blood sugar level at different times during the day. You can also ask a doctor to test your blood sugar. Your results with glucose meter may not be as accurate as a lab-drawn test would be. Urine glucose testing is not as accurate as blood glucose checks and should only be used when blood testing is impossible. Urine checks for ketones, however, is important when your diabetes is out of control. How Often Should You Check Your Blood Sugar Level? If you have type 1 diabetes, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Usually, you will test your blood sugar before meals and at bedtime. You may also check your blood sugar: After you eat out, especially if you have eaten foods you do not normally eat I Continue reading >>

How Much Does Chapati Increase Blood Sugar?

How Much Does Chapati Increase Blood Sugar?

Chapatis can keep your diabetes in check fact or myth? Well, it’s a myth. A nationwide study on dietary habits of Indians to understand why the country is plagued by diabetes found that high carbohydrate intake in diet is the reason behind blood sugar problem. High carbohydrate intake in diet is the reason behind blood sugar problem in Indian population. Dr Joshi further that this study neutralises the myth that only the south Indian population consumes high carbohydrates in their diet (rice, idli and so on). “We found the north Indian population have an equal percentage of carbohydrate intake in their diet. We think having chapati (wheat) can control blood sugar. It is a myth,” said Dr Joshi. According to the study, the carbohydrate per cent intake in the east region was 65, in west it was 60.9, north was 62.7, south is 62.3 and central is 67.2. “The national average of carbohydrate intake in Indians was found to be 64.1% which is above the upper limit of 60% than that recommended by the guidelines,” said Dr Joshi. While the study has underlined the fact that Indians consume high carbohydrate than the western population, the good news in the study is that diabetic people are aware that they have to restrict consumption of carbohydrates in their daily diet. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Cheap blood glucose meters are still accurate and consistent It may be tempting to judge a blood glucose meter solely by its initial cost. But given that someone testing their glucose levels four times a day can blow through more than 100 test strips in a month, a glucose meter's true cost is best measured by how much you spend on test strips over time. In fact, some major manufacturers give away their meters for free because they recoup their losses on sales of test strips. Still, the meters with the lowest yearly operating cost also tend to cost very little themselves. Take our best-reviewed cheap glucose meter, the Bayer Contour Next (Est. $15). It's one of the few truly inexpensive meters that not only makes it into clinical trials but also excels: In a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers found that the Bayer Contour Next outperformed a professional glucose monitor designed for point-of-care testing. This small, inexpensive glucose meter also receives Excellent scores for accuracy from a leading consumer research organization, alongside Very Good scores for repeatability and convenience. User reviews on the Bayer Contour Next tend to be very short and to the point; at this price, users just want a blood glucose meter that does its job. But they also love not having to code the meter when they open a new vial of test strips, being able to collect blood from almost any angle, and having the option to add more blood to the test strip if there wasn't enough the first time. The Bayer Contour Next requires a 0.6 microliter blood sample and allows you to use your palm as an alternate testing site. Other popular features -- and unusual finds on a glucose meter in this price range -- include the ability to add notes to store Continue reading >>

Save Money On Blood Glucose Test Strips

Save Money On Blood Glucose Test Strips

Testing your blood sugar regularly is the key to good diabetes control, but testing can get expensive. Ease the stress of managing your diabetes with these practical tips that can stretch your dollars while keeping you on track. Shop around, but steer clear of suspect sources. Online resources such as eBay and Craigslist sometimes offer tough-to-beat prices from people reselling test strips. "I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about six months ago. I bought my meter and strips at a drugstore right after but was shocked when the test strips cost $49.99 for a box of 50! Once those ran out, I got on eBay and looked for the exact same brand. I found them easily and have now bought two shipments of the same name-brand strips for just over $25, which includes shipping. It's a no-brainer to save $25," says Rich Mullikin of Galveston, Texas. However, most experts advise against buying test strips online because it's a gamble. In most cases, it's hard to know where the strips came from, how they were transported and stored, and whether the strips are defective or expired, says Eileen Wood, R.Ph., vice president of pharmacy services for Capital District Physicians' Health Plan in Albany, New York. Counterfeit strips that produce highly erratic results have even been found. On eBay, some sellers list an expiration date -- but not all do -- and some don't allow returns. "These practices are questionable," Wood says. "I'd feel more comfortable getting test strips from a pharmacy because it has to prove where they got the products, and there is oversight from state and federal licensing authorities." Test strip makers and distributors are required to register with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but private sellers are not. Go off-brand. Most off-brand strips are as accurate Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

To check your blood sugar level, gather your blood glucose meter, a test strip and your lancing device. Watch the video below or follow the steps outlined here. See how to prepare the meter and test strip, lance your finger and get a reading using the Accu-Chek® Aviva Plus system. The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your hands—using warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spot—don't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Discard the used lancet properly. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. Continue reading >>

New Device Brings Price Drop In Diabetes Test Strips

New Device Brings Price Drop In Diabetes Test Strips

iHealth Labs, a Mountain View company focused on mobile, personal, health technology has received FDA approval for what the company says is the world’s smallest mobile blood glucose monitor, called iHealth Align. But for people with diabetes, the bigger news is likely to be the cost of the test strips that the device will use. People with diabetes often check their blood sugar one or more times a day. The test strips that users fit into a monitor list at a dollar each, for some of the larger brands. The strips for the new device will run 25 cents each. The device itself is $16.95. “It’s probably more of a known secret in the marketplace that the real margins is within the strips,” Adam Lin, president of iHealth Labs told MobiHealthNews. “We (wanted) to pass on all that savings to the end users. It’s got to be simple to understand. You don’t have to go through all these issues for reimbursement. We brought it down to pretty much co-pay.” The new glucose monitor is just bigger than a quarter, and it plugs into a phone’s headphone jack. It can be used with either Apple or Android phones. It displays and stores readings using iHealth’s app. More from mobihealthnews: Lin thinks the lower cost will bring iHealth more market share, and it will be hard for the bigger players with larger overheads to follow suit. When users take their blood glucose with either of iHealth’s devices, they first scan the QR code on the box of test strips, which allows the app to track how many strips are left. iHealth is developing a feature by which users will be able to auto-reorder their strips based on that data, but right now the app simply reminds the user if strips are running low or about to expire. iHealth’s Wireless Smart Gluco-Monitoring System was featured briefl Continue reading >>

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Where’s the best place to buy blood glucose monitor test strips over-the-counter? And which test strips are the most affordable? We took a look at the top blood sugar test strip costs at a few of the major retailers to see what the best deals are. Hands down, the ReliOn brand of test strips is the most affordable if you’re paying for test strips out-of-pockt at a meager 18 cents per strip (in a 50 count box) at Walmart and 35 cents (in a 50 count box) if you buy on Amazon. However, it’s only available at Walmart (and Amazon), so that can make it difficult if there isn’t a Walmart in your area. The next most affordable test strip is the Bayer Contour Next, which came it between 77 cents and 86 cents per strip in their 50 count boxes if you buy them at a brick-and-mortar store, or 24 cents per strip on Amazon. Lifescan’s One Touch Ultra Blue, Roche’s Accuchek Aviva, and Abbott’s Freestyle Lite came in at well over a dollar a strip at all the major pharmacy retailers, but all of them in under a dollar a strip if you buy on Amazon. Roche’s Accuchek Aviva came in as the most expensive test strip at every retailer, except Amazon, where it came in a whole 5 cents cheaper than One Touch Ultra Blue. Amazon is for the most part the most affordable place to buy your test strips out-of-pocket, unless you’re buying Walmart’s ReliOn test strips. In that case, you’re better off just driving to Walmart. Here’s the full breakdown: Walmart One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $68.79 / $1.37 per strip Freestyle Lite – 50 count: $81.64 / $1.63 per strip Bayer Contour Next – 50 count: $38.88 / $.77 per strip ReliOn Prime – 50 count: $9.00 / $.18 per strip AccuChek Aviva Plus – 50 count: $82.27 / $1.64 per strip Walgreens One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $79.9 Continue reading >>

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Living with diabetes blog Many of you have expressed frustration with the high cost of blood glucose testing supplies, more specifically test strips. Some of you aren't testing as frequently as recommended because of the high cost. So what can you do about it? Here are some suggestions in the United States: Check with insurance or Medicare. Your insurance or Medicare will help to cover the cost of test strips if you have a prescription. Check with them, they may have a contract with a different meter company and you may be paying more than you have to for your test strips. Check with your blood glucose meter company. Many companies have programs or discount cards to help with the cost of testing supplies. The number should be on the back of your meter. Take advantage of military services. Establish care at a veterans medical center near you. Check with your military insurance for coverage. Your cost should be minimal. Ask your store. Store chains usually have non-branded meters and testing supplies at a lower cost than the branded meter you are using. Check with social services in your area for other resources near you. Any other suggestions are welcome! Have a good week. Continue reading >>

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

Test strips are sold separately from glucose monitors and can be pricey.(KRISTEN AFONSO/PRISCILLA DE CASTRO)Blood glucose monitors are devicesabout the size of a cell phone or smallerthat are used to monitor your blood sugar at home. Although they can be mistaken for the latest fancy digital device, these gadgets come with lancets, which are used to poke the finger, and test strips, which is where you place the drop of blood before inserting it into the monitor to get a blood-sugar reading. They range in price from $20 to $70, but are often given away for free by various health-care providers. Companies can afford to give the monitors away for free because they make their money from the glucose strips, which can be pricey$1 or more per strip. If you check your blood sugar as often as you should, you can easily spend more than $100 a month. The vast majority of your cost will come from glucose strips. So when choosing your device, you should pay attention to the cost of the strips, even if the monitor is free. Glucose Meters"This may save your life" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You may need to select a specific blood glucose monitor because that's what your insurance plan covers. Edith Sciamanna, 79, of Binghamton, N.Y. has the Accu-Chek Advantage for just that reason. "I'm quite satisfied with it," she says. However, if you do have the luxury of choice, there are differences between models that can help you decide (in addition to the cost of the strips). Consider that some systems: Are multisite: This means you can prick yourself not only on the finger but also on the upper arm, forearm, thigh, calf, or fleshy part of the hand. Require smaller samples of blood: The lancet doesn't poke the skin as deeply. Give results in as little as five seconds: This fe Continue reading >>

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