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How Many Carbs Raise Blood Sugar

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Carbohydrate Counting

A Beginner’s Guide To Carbohydrate Counting

Pia has a Bachelors Degree in Clinical Nutrition from Cornell University and a Masters of Science in Nutrition from New York University. She completed a dietetic internship at the Bronx Veterans Medical Center in order to become a registered dietitian. Prior to joining BD, Pia educated people with diabetes about medical nutrition therapy in a private physicians office, an outpatient clinic at a hospital and a nursing home where she counseled patients one-on-one and in group classes. This slide show explains: • What foods contain carbohydrates • How much of these foods you can eat • Where to look up the carb content of foods Next slide This is not true! Carbohydrates (carbs) have the greatest effect on your blood sugar. 90 to 100 percent of the carbs you eat appear in your bloodstream as blood glucose within minutes to hours after you have eaten. You may be asked to count the carbs that you eat. The carbs you will need to count are both: • starches that break down slowly into sugar • simple sugars that break down into blood glucose almost right away Many people believe that a diabetes meal plan means that you just have to cut back on sugar. Previous slide Next slide Products made from grains, such as pasta, bread, rolls, bagels, crackers, cereals and baked goods Starches include certain vegetables, all grains, and products made from grains All of these foods contain starches: Starchy Vegetables Regular and sweet potatoes, corn, fresh peas and lima beans Legumes Dried beans and peas Grains Grains like wheat, oats, barley, and rice Sugars include the natural sugars in fruit and milk, plus certain sweeteners added to prepared foods and drinks Fruit and fruit juices Foods that contain fruit or fruit juices such as jams, jellies, and fruit smooth Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

Confused about blood sugar? Here’s a quick and basic overview of what it is, what kinds of diet and lifestyle factors can affect it, and what that means from the perspective of a Paleo diet and lifestyle framework. What Is Blood Sugar? The “sugar” in “blood sugar” isn’t the same thing as table sugar. Biologically, “sugars” are simple carbohydrates, the building blocks of all the carbohydrates in everything you eat (including table sugar, but also including other foods that contain carbohydrates, like potatoes). One type of simple carbohydrate or “sugar” is glucose, which is the “sugar” measured when somebody measures your “blood sugar.” A more accurate name for it is “blood glucose,” which is what you’ll see in most studies. So having high blood sugar doesn’t mean that you ate a lot of table sugar and the sugar is now in your bloodstream; it means you ate a lot of carbohydrates (from any source) and the sugar (glucose) is now in your bloodstream. Any digestible carbohydrate can raise blood sugar, although some raise it higher and faster than others. Problems with Blood Sugar Regulation In healthy people, blood sugar is automatically regulated. You eat some carbs and your blood sugar rises, but insulin appears to the rescue and lowers blood sugar levels by storing the glucose for you to use later between meals (that’s an incredibly simplified explanation, and the reality is very complicated, but if you want more on insulin, you can read about it here). That’s how it works in healthy people. But problems with blood sugar regulation are incredibly widespread. In fact, some of them are so common we’ve almost stopped seeing them as problems – like the mood and energy rollercoaster that leaves you trying to drag yourself out of a mi Continue reading >>

5 Unusual Things That Drive Blood Sugar Through The Roof

5 Unusual Things That Drive Blood Sugar Through The Roof

back to Overview Of course, there are more than 5 things that send blood sugar soaring – that list is long! Ilka wrote about some things we often forget about, and I thought it would be good to take a fresh look at them again. Take it away, Ilka! Ilka Gdanietz: If I asked our team of diabetics what raises their blood sugars the most, I’d get as many different answers as there are people with diabetes on the team. Lots! Carbohydrates, a forgotten bolus … we know these things will shoot your sugar up quickly. The diabetes monster acts like a delicate flower sometimes, right? But there are also a bunch of things we never knew about, don’t think about in the moment, or simply forget. Here’s a small selection: Stress/excitement: You know the feeling. Whether it’s an appointment with the dentist, an argument with someone, or a jolt from a horror movie. Your body releases stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol that do not get along with blood sugar at all. Stupidly, stressful situations often occur unexpectedly, and it’s hard to react to the blood sugar spike fast enough. Additionally, stress means something different for each of us, and we don’t react the same to the same situations. In my case, for example, the sight of a nasty hairy spider is enough to make my blood sugar spike. Scott had the same thing when he saw a spider! Medications: Certain medications can increase blood sugar. These include, for example, beta-blockers, diuretics, or steroids like cortisone. Which meds may do what, the treating physician should know. This interaction is why it’s important to be thorough on your medication lists when at the doctor’s office or hospital. Caffeine: Yes, your beloved coffee can raise your blood sugar. Of course, the amount of caffeine ingested play Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Sugar

A Spoonful Of Sugar

Whenever I give a talk and make the statement that a normal blood sugar represents less than one teaspoon of sugar dissolved in the blood, I’m often met with scepticism. It really is true, however. Let’s go through the calculations so we can see exactly how this plays out. First, we need some basic measures. one liter (l)= 10 deciliters (dl) one gram (gm) = 1000 milligrams (mg) one teaspoon = 5 grams According to the American Diabetes Association the line between a healthy fasting blood sugar and a pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar is set at 100 mg/dl (pronounced 100 milligrams per deci-liter). A fasting blood sugar of between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl earns a diagnosis of pre-diabetes, and a fasting blood sugar of over 125 mg/dl is diabetic. So how much sugar is 99 mg/dl, the highest fasting blood sugar you can have and not be diagnosed as pre-diabetic? Let’s figure it out. We know that a typical human has about 5 liters of blood, so we need to figure out how much sugar dissolved into this 5 liters of blood will give us a reading of 99 mg/dl. Since one liter contains 10 deciliters we multiply 99 mg/dl by 10, which gives us 990 mg, the amount of sugar in one liter. Multiply the 990 mg in one liter times 5, the number of liters of blood in the human body, and we have 4950 mg of sugar. If we divide the 4950 by 1000, the number of mg in a gram, we get 4.95 grams of sugar. Since one teaspoon contains 5 grams, the 4.95 grams of sugar in the blood of a person just short of being pre-diabetic equals a little less than one teaspoon. If you run all these calculations for a blood sugar of 80 mg/dl, which is a much healthier blood sugar than the 99 mg/dl one that is knocking on the door of pre-diabetes, it turns out to be about 4/5 of a teaspoon. If you run the calculations for Continue reading >>

The Laws Of Small Numbers – Diabetes Solution

The Laws Of Small Numbers – Diabetes Solution

“Big inputs make big mistakes; small inputs make small mistakes.” That is the first thing my friend Kanji Ishikawa says to himself each morning on arising. It is his mantra, the single most important thing he knows about diabetes. Kanji is the oldest surviving type 1 diabetic in Japan (he is, by the way, younger than I, but afflicted with numerous long-term diabetic complications because of many years of uncontrolled blood sugars). Many biological and mechanical systems respond in a predictable way to small inputs but in a chaotic and considerably less predictable way to large inputs. Consider for a moment traffic. Put a small number of automobiles on a given stretch of highway and traffic acts in a predictable fashion: cars can maintain speed, enter and merge into open spaces, and exit with a minimum of danger. There’s room for error. Double the number of cars and the risks don’t just double, they increase geometrically. Triple or quadruple the number of cars and the unpredictability of a safe trip increases exponentially. The name of the game for the diabetic in achieving blood sugar normalization is predictability. It’s very difficult to use medications safely unless you can predict the effect they’ll have. Nor can you normalize blood sugar unless you can predict the effects of what you’re eating. If you can’t accurately predict your blood sugar levels, then you can’t accurately predict your needs for insulin or oral blood sugar–lowering agents. If the kinds of foods you’re eating give you consistently unpredictable blood sugar levels, then it will be impossible to normalize blood sugars. One of the prime intents of this book is to give you the information you need to learn how to predict your blood sugar levels and how to ensure that your predi Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Recently I have heard more and more people use the phrase “I don’t eat red meat because it bad for my blood sugars.” As red meat- along with any other cuts of meat- is a food made up of only fat and protein, eating red meat will have no immediate effect on your blood sugar. Crash course in macro-nutrients Foods can be broken up into three macro-nutrient categories: Carbohydrate, Fat and Protein. Blood sugars increase when we consume Carbohydrate foods- fruits, rice, beans, pastas, breads, milk, and starchy vegetables such as corn, potatoes and winter squash. As these foods are digested into their basic components- glucose is released into the bloodstream. This glucose is what causes blood sugars to raise after eating a food containing Carbohydrates. Protein foods however do not have glucose as part of their elemental structure, instead they break down into amino acids. Amino acids aid in building muscle and repairing cells in your body. Fats can be either saturated or unsaturated fats and fuel cells providing a required source of energy for our brains for survival. Red meat Foods are often a combination of these three macronutrients. Take red meat for example: Beef contains both protein and fat, but no carbohydrates. Where then does the misconception that red meat hurts blood sugars come from? Red meat is typically high in fats, especially saturated fatty acids. Foods containing fat are higher in calories which may lead to poor weight control if eaten in excess. As mentioned before, fats are essential for brain and cell health, but the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting fats to less than 30% of total calorie consumption with saturated fats making up less than 10% calorie consumption. Saturated fatty acids are the types of fat that stay solid at room Continue reading >>

How Do I Lower My Blood Glucose To Prevent Diabetes And Prediatebes?

How Do I Lower My Blood Glucose To Prevent Diabetes And Prediatebes?

Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the availablesugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. If you have problems with blood sugar control, you should routinely check your levels. This will help you learn how you respond to different activities and keep your blood sugar levels from getting either too high or too low. Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming and more. 2. Control your carb intake Your body breaks carbs down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system . Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve blood sugar control. Many studies also show that a low-carb diet helps reduce blood sugar levels and prevent blood sugar spikes. What’s more, a low-carb diet can help control blood sugar levels in the long run. 3. Increase your fiber intake Fiber slows carb digestion and sugar absorption. For these reasons, it promotes a more gradual rise in blood sugar levels. There are two kinds of fiber: insoluble and soluble. While both are important, soluble fiber specifically has been shown to lower blood sugar levels . Additionally, a high-fiber diet can help manage type 1 diabetes by improving blood sugar control and reducing blood sugar lows Continue reading >>

Can Oranges Raise Blood Sugar?

Can Oranges Raise Blood Sugar?

Whether you have diabetes or watch your blood sugars to maintain more stable energy levels, you know that some foods can raise your blood sugars more than others. Protein in meat, poultry and fish and fats found in oils and butter have little influence over your blood sugars. However, your consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods influences how high your blood sugars rise after you eat. The extent to which your blood sugars rise after eating oranges depends on the amount you have at one time, the size of the orange and its processing. Video of the Day The main factor that influences your blood sugar levels is the amount of carbohydrates you eat. Carbohydrates include the starches found in bread, potatoes and pasta as well as sugars found in sweets and desserts. Other types of sugars, such as lactose found in dairy products and glucose and fructose found in fruits, can also influence your blood sugar levels. Oranges, like other fruits, contain sugars that can raise your blood sugar levels. The available carbohydrate content of your oranges will tell you how high it can raise your blood sugars. You can calculate available carbs by subtracting their fiber content from their total carbs because, unlike other types of carbohydrates, fiber does not raise your blood sugar levels. For example, a small orange containing 11.3 grams of total carbs and 2.3 grams of fiber has an available carb content of 9 grams, while a large orange, with 21.6 grams of total carbs and 4.4 grams of fiber, has an available carb content of 17.2 grams of available carbs. As a comparison basis, a slice of bread has 15 grams of available carbs. The larger the orange you eat, the higher your blood sugars will rise. A glass of 1 cup of fresh orange juice has 25.8 grams of total carbs and 0.5 grams of fiber, Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

Demystifying Sugar

Demystifying Sugar

People with diabetes can enjoy sugar with a balanced diet. Contrary to popular opinion, people with diabetes can eat sugars and still meet their blood sugar goals. In the past, people with diabetes were told to avoid sugar as a way to control diabetes. And even today, you may hear someone you know tell you the same information. But the truth is, research has shown that people with diabetes can enjoy sugar and sugar-containing foods, in the context of a balanced diet. This section demystifies sugars. In this section, you will learn about: Understanding sugars Contrary to popular opinion, people with diabetes can eat sugars and still meet their blood sugar goals. Research shows that the total amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood sugar level. So how does sugar fit in the picture? Sugar is found in: Table sugar Brown sugar Molasses Honey Powdered sugar Cane sugar Raw sugar Agave nectar Syrups, like corn syrup and maple syrup Other names of sugar you might read are glucose, fructose, dextrose, maltose and sucrose Sugar, like all carbohydrates, contains food energy. Every gram of carbohydrate has about 4 calories. One teaspoon of sugar has about 5 grams of carbohydrate, and 20 calories. One tablespoon of sugar has about 15 grams of carbohydrate, and 60 calories. So it may be no surprise that sugar and sugar-containing foods still have an impact on your blood sugar and body weight, just like other carbohydrate foods. Can I include sugar in my meal plan? You can occasionally eat sugar and sugar-containing foods. Just like other carbohydrate foods, count the grams of carbohydrates in your sweets, and be sure to stay within your carbohydrate budget for the meal or snack. Sweets or desserts will need to replace another carbohydrate choice in order to Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

To What Extent Does Nicotine Gum Increase Blood Glucose Levels?

To What Extent Does Nicotine Gum Increase Blood Glucose Levels?

That depends on a number of factors: How many carbohydrates are there in each piece of gum? Bear in mind that sugar-free doesn’t mean carbohydrate-free. On average, from what I gather, a typical carbohydrate count for one piece of sugarless nicotine gum is 1. The carbohydrates come from sweeteners such as xylitol and/or sorbitol. The glycemic index (a measure of how quickly foods raise blood sugar) of xylitol is 7, compared to regular sugar, which has a glycemic index of 60-70 (3, 4). Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol. It, too, will raise blood sugar. While the effects of such a low carb level are negligible, they are real. You can’t consume an unlimited amount of xylitol or sorbitol sweetened food, or gum, without impacting your blood sugar. In fact, both of those sweeteners are on Dr. Richard K. Bernstein’s list of no-no’s. Which leads to your original question of “how much?” This question gets to the very heart of why diabetes is such a complicated disease, because… One size doesn’t fit all. How much do you weigh? Are you a child or an adult? Female or male? If you’re talking about a child, is that child going through growth spurts? If you’re female, are you menstruating? What’s the weather? Hot/humid? Cold? Have you been lifting weights? Have you been running? Performing cardiovascular exercise? Is your current blood sugar elevated, which causes insulin resistance and hence will lead to a larger blood sugar spike? I kid you not, those all impact the impact of carbohydrates on blood sugar levels. Take, for example, body mass. Ingesting a piece of bread means you’re eating, on average, 15 carbs. Spread those 15 carbs out over the bloodstream of a child who weighs, say, 60 lbs., and the blood sugar increase will be more than if a much larger person— Continue reading >>

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