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How Many Carbs Raise Blood Sugar

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Learning how to count the carbohydrates that you eat (carb counting) helps you plan what to eat. It will also keep your blood sugar under control. Your health care provider may tell you to eat a snack at certain times of the day, most often at bedtime. This helps keep your blood sugar from getting too low at night. Other times, you may have a snack before or during exercise for the same reason. Ask your provider about the snacks you can and you can't have. Needing to snack to prevent low blood sugar has become much less common because of new types of insulin that are better at matching the insulin your body needs at specific times. If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking insulin and often need to snack during the day, your doses of insulin may be too high and you should talk to your provider about this. You will also need to ask about what snacks to avoid. Your provider can tell you if you should snack at certain times to keep from having low blood sugar. This will be based on your: Diabetes treatment plan from your provider Expected physical activity Lifestyle Low blood sugar pattern Most often, your snacks will be easy to digest foods that have 15 to 45 grams of carbohydrates. Snack foods that have 15 grams (g) of carbohydrates are: Half cup (107 g) of canned fruit (without the juice or syrup) Half banana One medium apple One cup (173 g) melon balls Two small cookies Ten potato chips (varies with size of chips) Six jelly beans (varies with size of pieces) Having diabetes does not mean that you must stop eating snacks. It does mean that you should know what a snack does to your blood sugar. You also need to know what healthy snacks are so you can choose a snack that will not raise your blood sugar or make you gain weight. Ask your provider about what snacks you can Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between The Amount Of Carbs & Increase In Blood Glucose Value

The Relationship Between The Amount Of Carbs & Increase In Blood Glucose Value

Diabetics and other people watching their blood sugar need to pay particular attention to the amount of carbohydrate-containing foods they eat because carbohydrates are the most responsible for increases in blood sugar levels. The type of carbohydrate-containing food also plays a role, however, in how quickly and how much blood sugar levels increase. Carbohydrates, with the exception of fiber, get broken down into sugars by your body. These sugars then enter the bloodstream, increasing your blood glucose levels. Higher blood sugar levels lead the body to produce and release insulin, which causes your cells to pull extra sugar out of the bloodstream for storage. Should blood levels of sugar become too low, another hormone, called glucagon, causes the stored sugar to be released back into the bloodstream. People with diabetes either don't produce enough insulin or their body doesn't respond properly to insulin, causing a problem with this cycle. Recommended Consumption The more carbohydrates you consume, the more sugars will get released into your bloodstream. This doesn't mean diabetics need to avoid carbohydrates. In fact, they should get the same 45 percent to 65 percent of their calories from carbohydrates as nondiabetics. They just need to spread their carbohydrate intake evenly throughout the day, including about 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates in each meal. Foods high in fiber, such as legumes, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are best because the fiber slows down the release of sugar into the bloodstream and limits sudden spikes in blood sugar. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load On average, a gram of carbohydrate will raise blood glucose levels by about 4 points for someone weighing 150 pounds, or about 3 points for someone weighing 200 pounds. You can use the g Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

The Laws Of Small Numbers – Diabetes Solution

The Laws Of Small Numbers – Diabetes Solution

“Big inputs make big mistakes; small inputs make small mistakes.” That is the first thing my friend Kanji Ishikawa says to himself each morning on arising. It is his mantra, the single most important thing he knows about diabetes. Kanji is the oldest surviving type 1 diabetic in Japan (he is, by the way, younger than I, but afflicted with numerous long-term diabetic complications because of many years of uncontrolled blood sugars). Many biological and mechanical systems respond in a predictable way to small inputs but in a chaotic and considerably less predictable way to large inputs. Consider for a moment traffic. Put a small number of automobiles on a given stretch of highway and traffic acts in a predictable fashion: cars can maintain speed, enter and merge into open spaces, and exit with a minimum of danger. There’s room for error. Double the number of cars and the risks don’t just double, they increase geometrically. Triple or quadruple the number of cars and the unpredictability of a safe trip increases exponentially. The name of the game for the diabetic in achieving blood sugar normalization is predictability. It’s very difficult to use medications safely unless you can predict the effect they’ll have. Nor can you normalize blood sugar unless you can predict the effects of what you’re eating. If you can’t accurately predict your blood sugar levels, then you can’t accurately predict your needs for insulin or oral blood sugar–lowering agents. If the kinds of foods you’re eating give you consistently unpredictable blood sugar levels, then it will be impossible to normalize blood sugars. One of the prime intents of this book is to give you the information you need to learn how to predict your blood sugar levels and how to ensure that your predi Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Go One Year Without Any Sugar?

What Happens If You Go One Year Without Any Sugar?

Yes, sugar is delicious and tempting and even comforting. But eating too much can lead to all kinds of problems.Many Americans still eat up to five times the amount of sugar that’s recommended by the American Heart Association. This means women are eating up to 30 teaspoons of sugar per day, while men eat up to 45 teaspoons!Of course, they’re probably not sitting down eating spoon after spoon of white sugar, but in today’s society, hidden sugar is lurking everywhere. In fact, it’s found in 75% of packaged food purchased in the United States.But when you read on and discover these seven things that happen when you moderate your sugar intake, I’m sure you’ll agree with me that it’s totally worth it. Slow Down The Aging Process In a process known as glycation, excess sugar attaches to the collagen in our skin and other parts of the body. This causes inflammation and reduces the effectiveness of both collagen and elastin, the proteins in our skin that help it stay youthful. When these don’t work so well, your skin no longer looks supple and youthful. While glycation can’t be completely stopped, it can be slowed down. This problem is largely exacerbated by high blood sugar levels, which can result when you consistently eat to much sugar and are overweight.You don’t have to take my word for it, a study of 600 men and women found that those with higher blood sugar levels consistently looked older than those with lower blood sugar. Diabetics – whose blood sugar level had been raised over a long period of time – looked older than their peers who did not have diabetes. You’ll Probably Lose Weight Diets very high in energy from fructose (sugar) often lead to weight gain Basically, too many sugary foods over an extended period of time can cause resistance Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs. Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Treatment Plant For Hypoglycemia Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets. Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like or Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

What Foods Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

What Foods Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

How many carbs, fats, and proteins can I eat on a healthy diabetic meal plan? The number of carbohydrates (carbs), fats, and proteins in your plan will depend upon the ideal number of calories you should consume each day. Your age, gender, the amount of exercise you get, and your activity level affect the number of calories you need to eat in order to gain, lose, or maintain a healthy weight. A high-fiber diet has been shown to improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Fiber can be found in many foods, especially whole grains, beans, vegetables, nuts, and fruits. Can I have sugar on a diabetic meal plan? Most doctors and other medical or health care professional believe that people on a diabetic diet can have small amounts of sugar, so long as they are part of a healthy and balanced nutrition strategy. Table sugar does not raise blood glucose more than starches. Can I have alcohol on a diabetic diet? It may be OK for some people with diabetes to drink alcohol in moderation. It is best to drink alcohol when your blood sugar levels are under good control, and it is important to remember that wine and mixed drinks contain sugar, and alcohol has a lot of calories. Your doctor or health care professional can tell you if alcohol can be a safe part of your meal plan. What foods raise blood sugar levels? The extent to which carbohydrates raise blood sugar levels is known as their glycemic index. High glycemic index foods raise glucose levels faster and to a greater degree than low glycemic index foods. High glycemic index foods include: White bread, bagels Short-grain white rice Corn flakes or puffed rice cereal Russet potatoes Saltine crackers, pretzels, rice cakes Pumpkin Melons Pineapple Popcorn What foods help maintain good blood sugar level Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

Confused about blood sugar? Here’s a quick and basic overview of what it is, what kinds of diet and lifestyle factors can affect it, and what that means from the perspective of a Paleo diet and lifestyle framework. What Is Blood Sugar? The “sugar” in “blood sugar” isn’t the same thing as table sugar. Biologically, “sugars” are simple carbohydrates, the building blocks of all the carbohydrates in everything you eat (including table sugar, but also including other foods that contain carbohydrates, like potatoes). One type of simple carbohydrate or “sugar” is glucose, which is the “sugar” measured when somebody measures your “blood sugar.” A more accurate name for it is “blood glucose,” which is what you’ll see in most studies. So having high blood sugar doesn’t mean that you ate a lot of table sugar and the sugar is now in your bloodstream; it means you ate a lot of carbohydrates (from any source) and the sugar (glucose) is now in your bloodstream. Any digestible carbohydrate can raise blood sugar, although some raise it higher and faster than others. Problems with Blood Sugar Regulation In healthy people, blood sugar is automatically regulated. You eat some carbs and your blood sugar rises, but insulin appears to the rescue and lowers blood sugar levels by storing the glucose for you to use later between meals (that’s an incredibly simplified explanation, and the reality is very complicated, but if you want more on insulin, you can read about it here). That’s how it works in healthy people. But problems with blood sugar regulation are incredibly widespread. In fact, some of them are so common we’ve almost stopped seeing them as problems – like the mood and energy rollercoaster that leaves you trying to drag yourself out of a mi Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Move Your Blood Sugar Up

How Many Carbs Move Your Blood Sugar Up

Tramadol compared to meloxicam     Martin county school calendar 2017-2018      Employee skills matrix template excel diabetes medicine (pills or insulin) to cover the amount of carbohydrate at each meal. If you test soon after a meal, your blood sugar reading will probably be high. Even in . Only carbohydrate-containing foods have a glycemic index, which can be used to assess how quickly and how high your blood sugar levels will rise in response to different foods. Many high-glycemic foods can raise your blood sugar levels within as little as 15 minutes after eating, including white and whole-wheat bread,  . Aug 22, 2014 . So to sum it all up, glucose (from carbohydrates) is essential for your body, however you need just enough and not too much. When you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and over the next couple hours, your blood sugar goes down. If you don't eat, your body will find glucose from within your body, mainly by . Nov 19, 2010 . The quick carbs listed below should rapidly raise the blood sugar between 45 and 80 mg/dl (1.7 to 4.4 mmol) depending upon your weight.. When your readings rise and fall frequently, either you are on too much insulin in one of your doses (suggested by a pattern, such as frequent lows on waking), too . The faster your body can digest food, the faster and higher your glucose levels rise. If glucose levels rise too quickly, your pancreas may produce too much insulin, setting up a cycle of high and low blood sugar that can lead to insulin resistance, a precursor to Type 2 diabetes. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar, have the . Jul 21, 2016 . This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar. . To ensu Continue reading >>

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

If you have or are at risk for diabetes it is important to control your blood sugar levels through diet and exercise. Different foods affect blood sugar levels differently and each person with diabetes has unique responses to food. A physician or registered dietitian can help in formulating a healthy eating plan, which should include plenty of fruits and vegetables. However, even healthy foods such as bananas can raise blood sugar levels too much, so it is important to test often. Video of the Day After eating, the body breaks down the food into glucose or blood sugar to provide the body with energy. The hormone insulin must be present in order for the cells to use the glucose. Having diabetes means that the body either does not produce insulin or is unable to use it properly, which means blood sugar levels can get too high. Over time, high blood sugar levels can lead to vision problems, heart disease, damage to the kidneys and damage to the nerves. A large part of preventing diabetes related complications, is eating a healthy diet that keeps blood sugar levels within the range given to you by your doctor. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that affects blood glucose levels. Diabetics have to watch not just how many carbohydrates are eaten, but the type as well. Carbohydrates that come in the form of processed or refined grains such as white bread, white rice, potatoes and baked goods, tend to be digested very quickly. They can cause blood sugar levels to spike and drop, making diabetes harder to control. Carbohydrate sources such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains are digested more slowly, which helps to keep blood sugar levels in check. However, even healthy carbohydrates such as bananas need to be eaten in moderation and the best way to tell how a food affec Continue reading >>

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