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How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Per Day

Carbohydrate Counting Diet, 1200 Calorie Sample Menu

Carbohydrate Counting Diet, 1200 Calorie Sample Menu

What is it? Carbohydrate (kar-bo-hi-drate) counting means keeping track of the amount of carbohydrates you eat every day. Carbohydrates are found in breads and starches, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, sugars, and sweets. Carbohydrates become blood sugar (glucose) in your body after you eat. You may prevent kidney, eye, nerve, or heart problems by keeping your blood sugar within normal range diabetes. People with diabetes (di-uh-b-tees) may eat small amounts of food that contain sugar. But, the sugar containing foods must be included in the carbohydrate amounts allowed for each meal or snack. To control blood sugar, a diabetic must eat certain amounts of carbohydrates at the same time each day. One serving of a carbohydrate food contains 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrate. A carbohydrate food may be a fruit, dairy product, or a bread or starch serving in the amounts listed below. Vegetables contain only 5 grams of carbohydrate per serving. Do not count vegetables as carbohydrates unless you eat more than 2 servings per meal. Meat, meat substitutes, and fats are not counted as carbohydrates. Care: Carbohydrate Intake Your dietitian (di-uh-tih-shun) will explain when and how many carbohydrate servings or grams you can eat during the day. Ask your caregiver for the diabetic exchange diet CareNote to learn more about serving sizes. Talk with your caregiver if your blood sugar levels are too low or too high. Make sure your cholesterol and other blood lipids (fats) are checked at least once a year. You may need to follow a low fat diet if they are too high. Check with your dietitian before exchanging one kind of carbohydrate for another. Ask your dietitian or caregiver before eating the following foods: foods with added sugar corn syrup honey, molasses maple syrup jams and je Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

Protein is an essential macronutrient (that means it's a large nutrient; the other two macronutrients are fat and carbohydrate) that your body needs to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function, and they help some additional physiological processes. Usually, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes, and there are times when less protein is better. Daily Protein Intake As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 - 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein, which is the same amount suggested for a regular balanced diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates, and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, fish and seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. For example: One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein One cup black beans has 15 grams protein An egg has 6 grams protein One cup low-fat milk has 8 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein High Protein Diets and Diabetes Switching to a high-protein diet may seem like it should make a difference in blood sugar regulation, but the protein probably doesn't help much at all, at least for the long term. According to an evidence review done by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, increasing protein intake doesn't appear to have any appreciable impact on how your sugar is digested or absorbed. And it doesn't have any long-term effects on your blood sugar or insulin requirements.​​ So if a person with diabetes switches to a high-protein diet, any therapeutic benefit is p Continue reading >>

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

I'd appreciate learning about how many grams of carbohydrate I should eat as a guideline to keep my glucose numbers normal. Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Do You Need On A Diabetic-friendly Diet?

How Many Calories Do You Need On A Diabetic-friendly Diet?

Before planning a nutritional program, you need to know how much you need to eat on a daily basis to maintain your current weight. Then you can figure how rapidly a deficit of calories will get you to your goal. Finding your ideal weight range The ideal weight for your height is a range and not a single weight at each height. Because people have different amounts of muscle and different size frames, you’re considered normal if your weight is plus or minus 10 percent of this number. For example, a person who is calculated to have an ideal weight of 150 pounds is considered normal at a weight of 135 (150 minus 10 percent) to 165 (150 plus 10 percent) pounds. Because no two people, even twins, are totally alike in all aspects of their lives, you can only approximate your ideal weight and the number of calories you need to maintain that weight. You’ll test the correctness of the approximation by adding or subtracting calories. If your daily caloric needs are 2,000 kilocalories, and you find yourself putting on weight, try reducing your intake by 100 kilocalories and see whether you maintain your weight on fewer kilocalories. If you’re a male, your approximate ideal weight is 106 pounds for 5 feet of height plus 6 pounds for each inch over 5 feet. If you’re a female, your ideal weight is 100 pounds for 5 feet plus 5 pounds for each inch over 5 feet tall. For example, a 5-foot-4-inch male should weigh 130 pounds while the same height female should weigh 120 pounds. Your ideal weight range is then plus or minus 10 percent. The male could weigh 117 to 143 pounds and the female 108 to 132 pounds. Now you know your ideal weight for your height. What a surprise! Determining your caloric needs After you know about how much you should weigh, figure out how many calories you Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

Q: What are the recommended servings depending on calorie needs for people with diabetes? A: The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (part of the National Institutes of Health) recommends different amounts of fruit depending on how many calories you eat in a day. 1,200-1,600 calories per day: Two fruit servings per day 1,600-2,000 calories per day: Three fruit servings per day 2,000-2,400 calories per day: Four fruit servings per day A: It depends what kind of fruit you’re talking about. If it’s a round fruit like an apple or orange, it should be on the smaller size—about the size of a tennis ball. For fruit that can be measured by the cup like cubed melon or fresh berries, a serving is one cup. Q: Is fruit juice a nutritious choice? A: Unfortunately, not really. Drinking fruit juice doesn’t give you the same nutritional benefits as eating the entire fruit. And it’s tough to stick to four ounces or less, which is all you should be drinking at a time. A: Some fruit is higher in sugar than others. Recommended fruits for diabetics include cantaloupe, strawberries, clementine, avocado, banana, blackberries and more. If you go with frozen or canned fruit, make sure there aren’t any added sugars (the syrup is often packed with sugar). And when eating dried fruit, keep a close watch on portion sizes—they’re small and one serving (usually just a few tablespoons) and can be eaten really quickly. Try your best to stay away from syrup-filled canned fruit, fruit rolls, regular jam and jelly and sweetened applesauce. For other advice about what diabetics should and should not eat, check out these blogs: Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing around 3 carb servings (45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1-2 carb servings (15-30 grams grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1: Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 2/3 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (344 calories, 39 grams carbohydrates) • 1 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case honey, in plain yogurt. People with diabetes can s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes some women get during pregnancy. (Say: jess-tay-shun-al die-ah-bee-tees) If you have gestational diabetes, your body cannot use glucose (blood sugar) the way it should. Too much sugar stays in your blood. If you have gestational diabetes, you might be able to control your blood sugar levels with exercise and a healthy diet. Or, you might need insulin shots to keep your blood sugar at the right level. How does gestational diabetes affect my baby and me? Most women with gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies. Problems may develop if you have gestational diabetes that is not treated. Gestational diabetes can cause you to have a large baby. Giving birth to a large baby may hurt you or the baby. You may need a cesarean section (a surgical delivery) if your baby is too large to be born naturally. Gestational diabetes also can affect babies after they are born. Some of these babies have low blood sugar levels or jaundice (yellow-colored skin). These problems are treated in the hospital. A baby with a low blood sugar level is given sugar water. A baby with jaundice spends time under a special light. After delivery, you probably will not remain diabetic. However, you will be at higher risk for getting diabetes later in life. Why is it important to follow a special diet during pregnancy? A healthy diet can help protect you and your baby from gestational diabetes. For a pregnant woman, a normal diet consists of 2,200 to 2,500 calories per day. If you are overweight before you get pregnant, you will need fewer calories than other women. It is important to pay attention to what you eat and when you eat. What foods should I eat? Read package labels. Packaged foods are labeled to describe how much of certain Continue reading >>

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

The types of food you eat, when you eat them, the timing of medications and even physical activity levels can all affect blood sugar levels. A good component to type 2 diabetes management is keeping your blood sugar levels under control as best as possible. The road to management can be a challenging and winding one. The day-to-day efforts you put in trying to ensure you maintain your target blood sugar levels, can sometimes seem like minute-to-minute efforts. You’ve learned how to check your blood sugar, what medications you should take, recommendations on what you should eat, but have you learned what foods work best for you and your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are the one consistent factor in diabetes management that everyone, including doctors can agree require more information on how to manage them more effectively. What’s The Big Deal on Blood Sugars? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body is no longer sensitive to the insulin, or it begins to develop a delayed response to the way insulin is secreted to change your blood sugar levels. Beyond the complications associated with diabetes, high blood sugar levels can gradually do damage to all the blood vessels in the body. Over a longer period of time, these elevated blood sugars and damage can lead to a bigger problem of the loss in sensation throughout the body, particularly in the legs and feet. This condition is known as neuropathy. Deterioration of your eyesight, reduced kidney function and an elevated risk for heart disease are also potential complications. For more information read these guides: Episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar put those with type 2 diabetes at just as high of a risk for complications. Loss of consciousness, confusion, risk of seizures and potential brain damage when Continue reading >>

Understanding Food

Understanding Food

All food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. This page is an overview, and you will learn general information about: The subsequent sections provide more detailed information: Main sources of calories in food To begin with, let’s talk about food in general. We obtain nutrition through the various foods we eat. Foods supply critical vitamins and minerals essential for health. Foods also supply us with energy, or calories. To keep your body running, you need three types of food: However, all food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. There is not and ideal mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat that is right for everyone. Targets depend on your calorie goals, body weight, lipid profile, blood glucose control, activity levels, and personal preferences. A registered dietitian can help design a meal plan that is right for you. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest: Carbohydrates – 45 to 65% of your daily calories * Protein – 10 to 35% of your daily calories Fat- 20 to 35% of your daily calories * The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for carbohydrates is 130 grams per day. This is the “minimum” suggested intake for most people. The following is an example fuel mix. Your targets may vary. Carbohydrates If you have diabetes, it is essential to learn about carbohydrates. Why? Because among all the foods, carbohydrates have the largest effect on your blood sugar. Carbohydrates include starches and sugars. During digestion, both forms of carbohydrate break down in your body to single units of sugar, called glucose. Carbohydrate is an important part of your d Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

Diabetics must monitor their diets carefully to keep blood-sugar levels under control and prevent complications. As with healthy adults, a diabetic's caloric needs depend on gender, weight and physical activity level. If you have diabetes, discuss your calorie and nutrition requirements with your doctor or dietitian. Video of the Day 1,200 to 1,600 Calories The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse recommends a 1,200- to 1,600-calorie diet for small women who exercise, small and medium-sized women who want to lose weight and medium-sized women who are relatively inactive. This diet should include six servings of starches, two servings of milk and other dairy products, three servings of vegetables, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes, two servings of fruit and up to three servings of fats. 1,600 to 2,000 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse recommends a 1,600- to 2,000-calorie diet for the following: large women who want to lose weight, small men who don't need to lose weight, medium-sized men who are relatively inactive and medium-sized and large men who want to lose weight. This diet should include eight servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, three servings of fruit, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to four servings of fats. 2,000 to 2,400 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse advises a 2,000- to 2,400-calorie diet for medium-sized and large adults who are physically active and large men who don't need to lose weight. This diet should include 10 servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, four servings of fruit, 5 to 7 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to five servings of fats. Diabetes exchange lists provide specific serving-size information so Continue reading >>

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

My husband has been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic. What amount of carbs should he eat per day? I know that carbs are bad for him, but as they are in most foods, it's hard to be totally carb free. Also, we both eat a lot of fresh fruits and veggies, so what about the sugars they contain? Dr. Gourmet Says.... I am sorry for your husband's new diagnosis. For many the issue of having "pre-diabetes" or "insulin intolerance" is one that can be controlled through making changes in diet and exercise. In a lot of cases weight is a major factor and losing weight is key. First and foremost, carbohydrates are not bad. The issue is that most folks today eat far too many calories and end up eating a lot of carbohydrates. Often this is in the form of low quality carbs like the simple sugars in soda, candy, etc.. The key is for your husband to eat high quality calories no matter whether those calories come from carbohydrates, protein or fats. For instance, both Coca Cola and oatmeal are full of carbohydrates. The Coke contains 35 grams of carbs all in the form of simple sugar. That's about 150 calories that is drunk and used pretty quickly by the body and has been shown in research to not satisfy hunger well. In many cases folks drink that extra 35 grams of carbohydrates along with a meal and it is simply added calories that they don't need. On the other hand, a half cup of dry oatmeal has about 25 grams of carbohydrate. This is a large serving and even with a teaspoon of sugar on top (4 grams carbs) this is not many more calories than the soda. It is, however, filling, satisfying, and really good for you. There's 4 grams of fiber, 5 grams of protein and tons of vitamins and minerals. We know that in the case of diabetics eating oatmeal and other high fiber (good quality carbohydrate Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions we get is: how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? No doubt that's why you're here reading this as well, right? And like many other people you may be totally confused by that question. That's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it. Why is this? Well, there is no specific recommendation for carbs, that's why there are so many different numbers. However, there is good scientific evidence to suggest what's best. But unfortunately, that information is not getting out to the public (to YOU) as fast as it should. Luckily though, here at Diabetes Meal Plans, we pride ourselves on sharing up-to-date evidence-based info because we want you to get the best results. And we're proud to say what we share works: Sheryl says: “My doctor’s report was best ever: A1c was normal for the first time since I was diagnosed diabetic in 2007; My LDL was 60; my total cholesterol was 130. My lab results were improved across the board. Best news: I am taking less diabetic meds, and my weight is within 5 lbs of normal BMI. I am a believer in what you have written, and I’m grateful to have a site I can trust.” Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a low carb diet because research shows that lower carb diets produce far more effective results than traditional low fat diets. As you read on, be prepared to have some of your longheld diet beliefs shattered. But also be prepared to be amazed by the possibilities. Because with a few dietary changes, you can reverse* your diabetes and live your life anew! Rethinking ‘Mainstream' Carb Recommendations Over the years it’s been pretty common practice to recommend a low fat, high carbohydrate diet to people with type 2 Continue reading >>

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