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How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Per Day

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

Male diabetics can usually handle slightly more carbohydrates compared to female diabetics, but the optimal amount of carbs you should eat will also depend on your weight, physical activity level and blood-sugar control. Male diabetics will generally need fewer carbs compared to non-diabetics because an excess of carbs is associated with higher blood-sugar levels, which can eventually lead to diabetes complications. Working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian can help you dial in your carb intake to help you optimize your diabetes control and prevent complications. Carbohydrate counting is an important skill to learn to help diabetic males better understand the link between the food they eat and their blood-sugar levels. Carbohydrates are mainly found in foods containing sugar or flour, as well as in grains, starchy vegetables and fruits. Look at the nutrition facts table on food labels to determine the amount of carbs found per serving. Adjust the carb content according to the serving you consume. For example, if the label of a package of rice says that 1 cup of cooked rice contains 45 grams of carbs and you usually eat 2 cups of rice, your carb intake will reach 90 grams. Keep a food diary to keep track of the food you eat and your carb intake. Standard Advice The daily carb intake for male diabetics recommended by the American Diabetes Association varies between 135 and 180 grams for your three basic meals along with up to 60 to 90 grams of extra carbohydrates at snack time. Your daily recommended carb intake could therefore vary between 135 grams a day if you don't snack up to 270 grams a day. Since these recommendations are quite broad, the American Diabetes Association suggests working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian to get more speci Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss

Many people who are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, in fact in many cases; this is one of the reasons that they have become diabetic in the first place. For many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, weight loss can bring blood sugar levels back in line and avoid the need for medications such as insulin to control levels. However, for diabetics the process of losing weight can be more complex than for an individual with normal insulin production and controlled blood sugar levels, as there are more factors to consider when starting a diet. Changes in blood sugar must be monitored closely and medications may need to be adjusted as weight is lost. It is also important to keep intake of carbohydrates regular and controlled, whilst still reducing overall food intake to cut calories. For these reasons it is not advisable for a diabetic person to embark on a weight loss regime without the supervision of a health professional. The benefits of weight loss Studies have shown that even the smallest reduction in weight can have positive effects on blood sugar levels, even for very overweight people. Diet and exercise was found to reduce the risk of diabetes in at risk individuals who were overweight and had high blood sugar levels by around 58% in a National Institute of Health study. It is also agreed by experts that 5-10% weight loss in type 2 diabetics significantly reduces blood sugar levels and in some cases can mean they no longer require medications. The American Diabetes Association says that a weight loss of 10 to 15 pounds can have the effects of Lowering blood sugar levels Reducing blood pressure Improving cholesterol levels Reducing the strain on joints such as the knees and hips. Weight loss also gives people more energy, helps them to feel mor Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

More than 25.8 million children and adults in the United States live with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and experts say as many as 79 million more have prediabetes—a condition where elevated blood glucose levels raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. So how can you avoid or reverse prediabetes? Start by asking your doctor for fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); then follow these expert recommendations for staying diabetes-free. Diabetes lifestyle educator Get moving. If you are overweight, have high cholesterol, or have a family history of diabetes, you’re at risk. You can lower that risk by up to 58 percent by losing 7 percent of your body weight, which means exercise is essential. Start with 30 minutes of brisk walking five to six times per week; then try low-impact workouts like biking or swimming. Eat better. Reduce sugar intake to less than 6 teaspoons (24 grams) daily for women and less than 9 teaspoons (36 grams) per day for men. People at risk for prediabetes should follow a reduced-calorie and reduced-fat diet. Avoid trans fats and regulate high-caloric healthy fats like olive oil, nuts, and avocado. Make measureable changes. Wear a pedometer to calculate daily movement, start a food journal, and download online applications that track your weight-loss successes with graphs. –Jennifer Pells, PhD, Wellspring at Structure House, Durham, North Carolina Integrative physician Reduce stress. Chronic stress taxes the pancreas (the insulin-producing organ) and increases prediabetes risk. Honokiol, a magnolia bark extract, reduces stress and supports the pancreas by taming inflammation and oxidative stress. Take 250 mg twice per day with meals, for long-term use. Choose the right fiber. Fiber slows sugar’s release in Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions we get is: how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? No doubt that's why you're here reading this as well, right? And like many other people you may be totally confused by that question. That's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it. Why is this? Well, there is no specific recommendation for carbs, that's why there are so many different numbers. However, there is good scientific evidence to suggest what's best. But unfortunately, that information is not getting out to the public (to YOU) as fast as it should. Luckily though, here at Diabetes Meal Plans, we pride ourselves on sharing up-to-date evidence-based info because we want you to get the best results. And we're proud to say what we share works: Sheryl says: “My doctor’s report was best ever: A1c was normal for the first time since I was diagnosed diabetic in 2007; My LDL was 60; my total cholesterol was 130. My lab results were improved across the board. Best news: I am taking less diabetic meds, and my weight is within 5 lbs of normal BMI. I am a believer in what you have written, and I’m grateful to have a site I can trust.” Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a low carb diet because research shows that lower carb diets produce far more effective results than traditional low fat diets. As you read on, be prepared to have some of your longheld diet beliefs shattered. But also be prepared to be amazed by the possibilities. Because with a few dietary changes, you can reverse* your diabetes and live your life anew! Rethinking ‘Mainstream' Carb Recommendations Over the years it’s been pretty common practice to recommend a low fat, high carbohydrate diet to people with type 2 Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Have Per Day?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Have Per Day?

A diabetic's daily carbohydrate intake varies based on age, weight, gender, activity level and goal. An individual diabetic's needs can also vary, if he is to be active one day, but resting the next. Roughly half of all calories should come from carbohydrates, regardless of the day's carbohydrate total. Per Meal Women should have between 2 and 3.5 carbohydrate servings per meal, while men can have between 3 and 4. A carbohydrate serving is considered 15 grams, meaning that the total number of carbohydrates a woman should have at one sitting is between 30 and 55 grams and for men is 50 to 65. Be sure to read labels carefully to make sure the math adds up. For instance, a serving size of peanut butter is not the same as a serving size of carbohydrates. A two-tablespoon serving size of peanut butter is 8 grams of carbohydrates, making two servings of peanut butter 16 grams of carbohydrates or roughly one carbohydrate portion for meal purposes. Weight Variations Overweight diabetics should consume fewer carbohydrates than normal-weight diabetics, but never consume less than 130 grams of carbohydrates for an entire day. Important nutrition could be lost, or blood-glucose levels could dip too low, leading to hypoglycemia. Variety Do not get all your carbohydrates from one source. Eat a variety of proteins, fruits, vegetables and starches. A good rule is to keep carbohydrate totals from each group at roughly 12 to 15 grams per meal. Consistency Eat the same amount of carbohydrates at every meal throughout the day, since this prevents blood-sugar spikes. If on a 180-gram carbohydrate diet, but you can't consume 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal three times a day, try smaller meals, say four 40-gram carbohydrate meals and a 20-gram snack. Always add grams from snacks to your da Continue reading >>

How Many Meals Should You Eat Each Day?

How Many Meals Should You Eat Each Day?

Do you snack throughout the day, or stick to three square meals? If you’re concerned about your waistline, there may be an even better habit: People who eat two large meals per day may lose more weight than people who eat more frequently—even if they consume the same amount of total calories, according to a new study conducted in Prague and presented at the American Diabetes Association 73rd Scientific Sessions. The Surprising Findings In the study, participants with type 2 diabetes followed two different weight-loss diets for 12 weeks each: One group ate three meals and three snacks every day, and the other group ate two large meals, breakfast and lunch. Both groups consumed the same amount of calories and nutrients, but the dieters who ate just twice a day reduced their BMIs by three times as much as the six-meal-per-day group. Why? When you cut back on calories, your metabolism slows down. But in this case, when people ate just two meals a day, their metabolisms didn’t decrease as much as they did when they ate more often—perhaps because their bodies worked harder to digest the bigger meals, says lead study author Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, of the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague. The Catch Don’t swear off dinner just yet. The study subjects were diabetic, so there’s no evidence that the diet will work as well for people who don’t have the disease, says Stephen Gullo, PhD, president of the Center for Health and Weight Sciences in New York City and Women's Health weight-loss expert. In fact, the majority of weight-loss research done on non-diabetics actually suggests that a diet like the one outlined above is bad for your weight: that when you eat too many calories at once, you actually store the extra ones as fat instead of burnin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The right diabetes diet is crucial to managing type 2 diabetes, maintaining stable blood sugar levels, and preserving your overall health. However, it's not as complex or out of the ordinary as you might expect. A smart diabetic diet actually looks a lot like the healthy eating plan doctors recommend for everyone: plenty of fruits and vegetables, simple carbohydrates in moderation, and fats sparingly. Count Calories to Manage Diabetes The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends the following calorie guidelines for people who are managing diabetes: About 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day for small women who are physically active, small or medium-sized women interested in weight loss, or medium-sized women who are not physically active. About 1,600 to 2,000 calories a day for large women interested in weight loss, small men at a healthy weight, medium-sized men who aren't physically active, or medium-sized or large men interested in weight loss. About 2,000 to 2,400 calories a day for medium-sized or large men who are physically active, large men at a healthy weight or who are medium-sized, or large women who are very physically active. Reach for the Right Carbohydrates You can't avoid carbohydrates completely. They are our main source of energy, but they also lead to the biggest fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Choosing your carbohydrates wisely is critical to managing diabetes. Complex carbohydrates, or those that are rich in fiber, should constitute between 45 and 65 percent of your daily caloric intake. To make the best choices, keep these guidelines in mind: Get most or all of your carbohydrates from high-fiber sources like vegetables, beans, fruits, and whole grains. High-fiber foods are digested more slowly, which helps keep your blood sugar levels stable. Av Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet

Diabetes Diet

Description An in-depth report on how people with diabetes can eat healthy diets and manage their blood glucose. Alternative Names Diet - diabetes; Blood sugar management Highlights General Recommendations for Diabetes Diet Patients with pre-diabetes or diabetes should consult a registered dietician who is knowledgeable about diabetes nutrition. An experienced dietician can provide valuable advice and help create an individualized diet plan. Even modest weight loss can improve insulin resistance (the basic problem in type 2 diabetes) in people with pre-diabetes or diabetes who are overweight or obese. Physical activity, even without weight loss, is also very important. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) encourages consumption of healthy fiber-rich foods including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. But it is also important to monitor carbohydrate intake through carbohydrate counting, exchanges, or estimation. The glycemic index, which measures how quickly a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar levels, may be a helpful addition to carbohydrate counting. Low-Carb and Low-Fat Diets The ADA notes that weight loss plans that restrict carbohydrate or fat intake can help reduce weight in the short term (up to 1 year). According to the ADA, the most important component of a weight loss plan is not its dietary composition, but whether or not a person can stick with it. The ADA has found that both low-carb and low-fat diets work equally well, and patients may have a personal preference for one plan or the other. Patients with kidney problems need to limit their protein intake and should not replace carbohydrates with large amounts of protein foods. (However, patients who are on dialysis require more protein.) Introduction The two major forms of diabetes Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting Diet, 1200 Calorie Sample Menu

Carbohydrate Counting Diet, 1200 Calorie Sample Menu

What is it? Carbohydrate (kar-bo-hi-drate) counting means keeping track of the amount of carbohydrates you eat every day. Carbohydrates are found in breads and starches, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, sugars, and sweets. Carbohydrates become blood sugar (glucose) in your body after you eat. You may prevent kidney, eye, nerve, or heart problems by keeping your blood sugar within normal range diabetes. People with diabetes (di-uh-b-tees) may eat small amounts of food that contain sugar. But, the sugar containing foods must be included in the carbohydrate amounts allowed for each meal or snack. To control blood sugar, a diabetic must eat certain amounts of carbohydrates at the same time each day. One serving of a carbohydrate food contains 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrate. A carbohydrate food may be a fruit, dairy product, or a bread or starch serving in the amounts listed below. Vegetables contain only 5 grams of carbohydrate per serving. Do not count vegetables as carbohydrates unless you eat more than 2 servings per meal. Meat, meat substitutes, and fats are not counted as carbohydrates. Care: Carbohydrate Intake Your dietitian (di-uh-tih-shun) will explain when and how many carbohydrate servings or grams you can eat during the day. Ask your caregiver for the diabetic exchange diet CareNote to learn more about serving sizes. Talk with your caregiver if your blood sugar levels are too low or too high. Make sure your cholesterol and other blood lipids (fats) are checked at least once a year. You may need to follow a low fat diet if they are too high. Check with your dietitian before exchanging one kind of carbohydrate for another. Ask your dietitian or caregiver before eating the following foods: foods with added sugar corn syrup honey, molasses maple syrup jams and je Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

The types of food you eat, when you eat them, the timing of medications and even physical activity levels can all affect blood sugar levels. A good component to type 2 diabetes management is keeping your blood sugar levels under control as best as possible. The road to management can be a challenging and winding one. The day-to-day efforts you put in trying to ensure you maintain your target blood sugar levels, can sometimes seem like minute-to-minute efforts. You’ve learned how to check your blood sugar, what medications you should take, recommendations on what you should eat, but have you learned what foods work best for you and your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are the one consistent factor in diabetes management that everyone, including doctors can agree require more information on how to manage them more effectively. What’s The Big Deal on Blood Sugars? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body is no longer sensitive to the insulin, or it begins to develop a delayed response to the way insulin is secreted to change your blood sugar levels. Beyond the complications associated with diabetes, high blood sugar levels can gradually do damage to all the blood vessels in the body. Over a longer period of time, these elevated blood sugars and damage can lead to a bigger problem of the loss in sensation throughout the body, particularly in the legs and feet. This condition is known as neuropathy. Deterioration of your eyesight, reduced kidney function and an elevated risk for heart disease are also potential complications. For more information read these guides: Episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar put those with type 2 diabetes at just as high of a risk for complications. Loss of consciousness, confusion, risk of seizures and potential brain damage when Continue reading >>

Fat Grams—how Much Fat Should You Eat Per Day?

Fat Grams—how Much Fat Should You Eat Per Day?

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Fat is an important part of your diet, but figuring out how much to eat can be confusing. Over the last 50 years, everyday diets have gone from moderate-fat to low-fat, based on recommendations from health organizations. However, the 2015–2020 US Dietary Guidelines no longer specify an upper limit for how much total fat you should consume. This article takes a detailed look at different types of fat and provides suggestions for how much to eat per day. What Is Fat? Along with protein and carbs, fat is one of the three macronutrients in your diet. You consume fat in the form of triglycerides. A triglyceride molecule is made up of three fatty acids attached to a glycerol backbone. The fatty acids contain chains of carbons and hydrogens. One way fats are classified is by the length of their carbon chains: Short-chain fatty acids: Fewer than 6 carbons. Medium-chain fatty acids: 6–12 carbons. Long-chain fatty acids: 13–21 carbons. Very-long-chain fatty acids: 22 or more carbons. Most of the fats you eat are long-chain fatty acids. Short-chain fatty acids are mainly produced when bacteria ferment soluble fiber in your colon, although milk fat also contains small amounts. Long-chain and very-long-chain fats are absorbed into the bloodstream and released into the body’s cells as needed. However, short-chain and medium-chain fats are taken up directly by the liver to be used as energy. Bottom Line: Fats are one of the three macronutrients. They are absorbed from food and used by the body for energy and other functions. Functions and Benefits of Fat Fat performs a number of functions and provides several health benefits: Energy: Fat is an excellent energy source. It provides 9 calories per gram, whereas protein and carbs each provide 4 calo Continue reading >>

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

Q: What are the recommended servings depending on calorie needs for people with diabetes? A: The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (part of the National Institutes of Health) recommends different amounts of fruit depending on how many calories you eat in a day. 1,200-1,600 calories per day: Two fruit servings per day 1,600-2,000 calories per day: Three fruit servings per day 2,000-2,400 calories per day: Four fruit servings per day A: It depends what kind of fruit you’re talking about. If it’s a round fruit like an apple or orange, it should be on the smaller size—about the size of a tennis ball. For fruit that can be measured by the cup like cubed melon or fresh berries, a serving is one cup. Q: Is fruit juice a nutritious choice? A: Unfortunately, not really. Drinking fruit juice doesn’t give you the same nutritional benefits as eating the entire fruit. And it’s tough to stick to four ounces or less, which is all you should be drinking at a time. A: Some fruit is higher in sugar than others. Recommended fruits for diabetics include cantaloupe, strawberries, clementine, avocado, banana, blackberries and more. If you go with frozen or canned fruit, make sure there aren’t any added sugars (the syrup is often packed with sugar). And when eating dried fruit, keep a close watch on portion sizes—they’re small and one serving (usually just a few tablespoons) and can be eaten really quickly. Try your best to stay away from syrup-filled canned fruit, fruit rolls, regular jam and jelly and sweetened applesauce. For other advice about what diabetics should and should not eat, check out these blogs: Continue reading >>

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