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How Long To Lower A1c

How Long Does It Take To Lower A1c & Ways To Lower A1c

How Long Does It Take To Lower A1c & Ways To Lower A1c

A1C is a blood test that is done to diagnose diabetes in a patient and also to check how well the patient is managing his/her diabetes if already diagnosed with it. A1C gives information regarding the patient's average blood sugar levels over a period of 2 to 3 months. The score of A1C test is indicated in percentage. The greater the percentage of A1C, the higher will be the average blood glucose level and the higher is the risk for diabetes or its related complications. A1C test cannot be used for gestational diabetes. However, A1C test is helpful in predicting the likelihood of someone getting diabetes. How Beneficial is the A1C Test? The A1C test measures the amount of sugar or glucose which is attached to the hemoglobin in red blood cells. The more the percentage of the glucose attached, the higher will be the level of A1C. A1C is a groundbreaking test as this test: Doesn't need fasting. Gives an average picture of blood sugar levels over a period 2 to 3 months. And this test can be done at any time of the day. The average life span of red blood cells (RBCs) and hemoglobin is 120 days. During this period the glucose molecules are exposed to the RBCs which result in formation of glycated hemoglobin. So, theoretically any change in the A1C levels won't be obvious for at a minimum of 120 days which is the time taken for the affected red blood cells to complete a life cycle. The time taken to lower the A1C level also depends on the target level of the patient. If the A1C level of the patient is in double digits, then it can take around 2 to 3 months to lower the A1C level given that the patient strictly adheres to the management plan of his diabetes. A normal A1C score should be below 5.7 percent. A1C which is in between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates that the patient is Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

As a Diabetic Health coach, the majority of my clients come to me looking for help to lower their A1C. Being a Type 1 diabetic for fifteen years, I understand that a lower A1C is more than just a number. It’s about getting control of your life. When I was diagnosed at seven years old, I was extremely fortunate to have parents that took really great care of me. I remember growing up with my dad telling me, “Out of all the report cards you will ever bring home, your A1C report is the most important one!” The majority of my childhood I had a decent A1C that averaged in the mid 7’s. It was never terrible, but it was always a goal of mine to get it as low as possible to reduce future complications. When I went off to college and became more independent, things changed. While most kids were partying and eating fast food at 2 a.m., I was playing Division 1 soccer, and knew that if I wanted to perform my best, I needed to feel my best. Through self-education and attending the Institute for Integrative Nutrition after college, I started implementing tools for both my mind and body which helped me become healthier and more in control of my diabetes. Today, I want to share with you how I lowered my A1C from a 7.5 to a 5.7, and became the healthiest and happiest I have ever been. If you want tighter control of your blood sugar numbers, start by looking at your level of satisfaction in these 5 areas: 1 – Organization I find that organization makes life with diabetes less overwhelming. Every Sunday night I plan out my week. I write down days, times, and details for food shopping, morning meditation, workouts, pump set changes, appointments, and meal prepping. When I’m organized from day to day, I have more energy to focus on my diabetes control. This also empowers me both Continue reading >>

Understanding Your A1c: 7 A1c Lowering Tips For Insulin Users

Understanding Your A1c: 7 A1c Lowering Tips For Insulin Users

There is no magic formula for achieving a "perfect A1c" or super food that will fix blood sugar levels in a flash. The most important thing to remember is that it takes daily dedication and sometimes several months before you will see any significant improvements in your A1c level. Because your A1c results are a reflection of your blood glucose readings over the past three months, ultimately getting a lower A1c is all about keeping your blood glucose under control daily. Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly are key to keeping your blood sugar under control, but some of these tips may also help you keep your A1c results on target. Take mealtime insulin before eating. The goal of mealtime insulin is to lower your blood glucose level just as your food is raising it so that your numbers don’t spike. A study done by the Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes and Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics found that taking bolus (or rapid-acting) insulin 20 minutes prior to a meal resulted in significantly better glucose control than when insulin was given immediately before a meal or 20 minutes after a meal. It may take a little bit of experimenting to find the exact amount of time before a meal that works best for taking your insulin, but timing bolus insulin correctly may greatly help you increase your blood glucose control. Be careful that while you take your mealtime insulin before you eat not to take insulin too long before eating as this can result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Also, if your pre-meal blood sugar test is low, you should not give insulin before beginning your meal as you may experience a dangerously low blood sugar. Fine tune basal (or long-action) insulin. Where bolus insulin is meant to counteract blood glucose rises from meals, basal insulin k Continue reading >>

The A1c Test & Diabetes

The A1c Test & Diabetes

What is the A1C test? The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management and diabetes research. How does the A1C test work? The A1C test is based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. In the body, red blood cells are constantly forming and dying, but typically they live for about 3 months. Thus, the A1C test reflects the average of a person’s blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. The A1C test result is reported as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher a person’s blood glucose levels have been. A normal A1C level is below 5.7 percent. Can the A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert committee recommended the A1C test as one of the tests available to help diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.1 Previously, only the traditional blood glucose tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Because the A1C test does not require fasting and blood can be drawn for the test at any time of day, experts are hoping its convenience will allow more people to get tested—thus, decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes. However, some medical organizations continue to recommend using blood glucose tests for diagnosis. Why should a person be tested for diabetes? Testing is especially important because early in the disease diabetes has no symptoms. Although no test is perfect, the A1C and blood glucose tests are the best tools available to diagnose diabetes—a serious and li Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

How Much Does Metformin Lower Hba1c Level?

How Much Does Metformin Lower Hba1c Level?

This article requires a subscription for full access. NEJM Journal Watch articles published within the last six months are available to subscribers only. Articles published more than 6 months ago are available to registered users. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Your A1c Test

Diabetes: Your A1c Test

www.CardioSmart.org The hemoglobin A1c test is a simple blood test that checks howmuch sugar, or glucose, is stuck to your red blood cells. This test also is called the glycohemoglobin test or the A1c test. Most doctors think the A1c test is the best way to monitor your diabetes over the long term. What does your A1c result mean? Your test results tell you how well you have controlled your diabetes over the last 3 months. With this information, your doctor can adjust your medicine and diabetes treatment, if necessary. This test also gives you an idea of how likely you are to develop problems such as kidney failure, vision trouble, or numbness in your leg or foot. Keeping your A1c level in your target range can lower your chance for problems. The test result is usually given as a percentage. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that most non-pregnant adults with diabetes have an A1c level less than 7%. If your A1c level is higher than your target A1c level, the ADA recommends that your doctor look at making changes in your diabetes treatment. To lower your A1c level, your blood sugar needs to be lower. In some people with diabetes, having blood sugar that is too low may cause problems. Your doctor can help you decide the best and safest A1c level. How often should you have your A1c tested? If you have diabetes, your doctor may order a test every 3 to 6months, depending on your type of diabetes and how well you control it. Generally, A1c is checked 2 to 4 times a year. Talk with your doctor about how often you should expect to have this test. If your levels have been good for several tests, you may not need the test as often. Do you need to fast before your A1c test? You do not need to fast before this test. You can have this test at any time during the day, Continue reading >>

How To Lower A1c Levels

How To Lower A1c Levels

Reader Approved A1C is a form of glucose in the body that is regularly measured in people who suffer from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A1C is generally used to determine a diabetic’s average blood sugar levels from previous months, and can aid healthcare providers in prescribing and recommending treatments to those with diabetes. A1C levels can generally be lowered by practicing healthy living, including adhering to proper nutrition, exercising regularly, and managing stress. 1 Add a higher number of fruits and vegetables to your diet. Fruits and vegetables contain a number of antioxidants that promote better health in general, and are also high in fiber, which studies have shown can contribute to better blood sugar management.[1] 2 Eat more beans and legumes. According to Harvard University Health Services, one-half cup (118 ml) of beans will provide you with one-third of your daily fiber requirement. Beans will also slow down the digestion process, and help stabilize blood sugar levels following meals.[2] 3 Consume more fat-free milk and yogurt. Fat-free milk and yogurt are rich in calcium and vitamin D, which have been shown to contribute to better blood sugar management and weight loss, the latter of which can help improve most cases of type 2 diabetes. 4 Increase your intake of nuts and fish. Most nuts and fatty fish including tuna, mackerel, and salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids that will help lower insulin resistance, regulate blood sugar levels, and contribute to better heart health. Nuts can also benefit type 2 diabetics who are trying to lower their cholesterol levels. 5 Spice your food with cinnamon. Although cinnamon is generally associated with sweets and desserts, research has shown that consuming one-half tsp. (2 ml) cinnamon per day can improve insulin Continue reading >>

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

If you’re like me, you might have a health-focused New Year’s resolution posted on your wall: "lose weight," "exercise more, "be less stressed." Unfortunately, making resolutions is easy, but sticking to them is hard. A 15,000-person survey found that four out of five people who make New Year’s resolutions eventually break them. And it gets worse: a sizeable percentage of people (11%) in one survey actually broke their resolution one week in! As I pondered this depressing data, I thought about scientifically testing the simplest, most fundamental exercise possible: walking. It can be done anywhere, does not cost anything, and requires no equipment. And because the barriers to doing it are so low, it also helps address that very basic New Year’s Resolution conundrum outlined above. What follows is my personal diabetes experience testing the blood sugar benefits of walking, a brief review of studies on diabetes and walking, and five tips to incorporate walking into your daily routine. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! Walking with diabetes – my own experience As a fitness fiend my whole life, I tend to think of “exercise” with a very intense, all-or-nothing frame of reference: cycling, strength training, and playing basketball. So when I approached the question of how much walking could really drop my blood sugars, I was skeptical. In an effort to test it objectively, I performed a dozen periods of walking, and measured my blood glucose immediately before and immediately after finishing. I timed each walk with a stopwatch, always made sure I had less than one unit of insulin-on-board, and tried to go at a normal speed. On average, walking dropped my blood sugar by approximately one mg/dl per minute. The la Continue reading >>

Lowering A1c Levels Naturally

Lowering A1c Levels Naturally

Call it what you will: hemoglobin A1C, glycosylated hemoglobin, HbA1c, or just “A1C,” this number plays a huge role in how your diabetes is managed. It’s also used to diagnose diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Your A1C is a blood test that provides information about your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. Your provider and diabetes care team use this number to gauge how things are going and if and how to tweak your diabetes treatment plan. For most people who have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an A1C of less than 7%. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) advises a tighter goal of 6.5% or lower. Your goal may be completely different, and that’s OK (just make sure you know what it is!). Why lower your A1C? A1C goals aren’t decided upon out of thin air. The targets that the ADA, AACE, or your provider advise for you are based on clinical research, as well as other factors, such as your age, your overall health, and your risk of hypoglycemia. Landmark clinical trials, such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), for example, have correlated lowering A1C with a decrease in diabetes-related complications. So, for every one point that you lower your A1C, you’ll lower your complication risk as follows: • Eye disease by 76% • Nerve damage by 60% • Heart attack or stroke by 57% • Kidney disease by 50% It’s important to realize that your A1C reflects an average of your blood sugar numbers. Your A1C might be 6.7%, but that may be because you’re having a lot of low blood sugars, for example. For this reason, your A1C should be viewed as part of the picture, and not in isolation. Your blood sugar readings Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c

How To Lower Your A1c

According to the American Diabetes Association, it is recommended that you have the A1C test administered twice a year, so long as your diabetes is well managed and your blood sugar levels have been consistent. This test can provide valuable insight into how well your diabetes treatment has been working—and how you can adjust it to work better in the future. For individuals who haven’t been able to control their diabetes and sugar levels as well, a doctor may request that you have the test run every few months until your A1C falls into your target range. Steps to Help Achieve a Lower A1C Diabetes is a complex condition, requiring detailed management and understanding. This can be like a second job for many patients. While it does take significant effort to manage diabetes properly, it can lead to a much more rewarding quality of life for patients. These simple changes can help you secure that lower A1C you’ve been striving for: 1. Get More Active You don’t need to run a marathon or break a weight lifting record—just start by getting around 30 minutes of exercise around 5 days a week. This doesn’t even need to be “formal” exercising, like going to the gym or running laps. Instead, this can be something like going for a walk with your dog, playing tennis, riding a bike, or other alternatives. Even yoga and stretching can be extremely beneficial. So long as you are moving, your body will be grateful! 2. Balance Your Diet Eating smart with diabetes can be difficult. Try to keep an eye on the amount of fruits, proteins, fats and complex carbs you are eating. You don’t have to cut these out of your diet completely, but you should be monitoring your portion sizes and ensuring you aren’t over doing it. Fill up on green vegetables, salads, and other non-starc Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

“And by the third day, I got this burst of energy,” says Mr. Garlin. “I felt as good as I did when I was in high school. And all this without taking any medications… just eating healthy and exercising. That’s all it was!” Not everyone’s blood sugar (glucose) tumbles as quickly as Mr. Garlin’s, but there is plenty of research affirming that a healthy diet like the Pritikin Eating Plan combined with daily exercise can profoundly reduce blood sugar levels in just two to three week’s time. Prevention of Diabetes There is also strong science showing that a healthy lifestyle like Pritikin can prevent pre-diabetes from developing into full-blown diabetes. (Pre-diabetes is defined as having a fasting glucose between 100 and 125. Diabetes is a fasting glucose of 126 or higher.) Foods That Fight Diabetes Pritikin eating means focusing on whole foods that are naturally rich in fiber and naturally low in fats, sugars, and industrial refinement. Pritikin foods are vegetables, whole fruits (not juice), whole grains, legumes such as beans and peas, nonfat dairy foods, and moderate servings of lean meat such as fish, skinless chicken breast, and game meat like bison and venison. How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes? | The Science About 20 years ago, scientists began discovering how quickly diabetes could be reversed. Researchers at UCLA tracked1 men and women with type 2 diabetes who had attended the Pritikin Longevity Center, where they learned and adopted healthy Pritikin food and fitness habits. Three Weeks Among the 652 people studied, 240 were “new diabetics,” that is, they had only recently been diagnosed with the disease; they were not yet taking any medications. Within an average of three weeks at Pritikin, the blood sugar (glucose) levels of these ne Continue reading >>

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