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How Long Does It Take Cinnamon To Lower Blood Sugar

How To Use Cinnamon To Lower Your Blood Sugar

How To Use Cinnamon To Lower Your Blood Sugar

In the video below, I quickly summarize the pros and cons of Cinnamon Extract… And how to best use it for maximum safety and effectiveness. “So How Effective Is Cinnamon For Lowering Blood Sugar & Glucose?…” Out of 50 natural ingredients tested, this popular spice was far and away the best for promoting healthy glucose metabolism. It can also help support healthy cholesterol levels. It works because of Hydroxychalcone, the active ingredient in cinnamon, boosts the effect of insulin by increasing its sensitivity to glucose and facilitating delivery into the cells where it can be stored and synthesized. Additionally, certain compounds in cinnamon inhibit an enzyme that inactivates insulin receptors, further improving cell’s ability to utilize circulating glucose. Here Are The 5 Ways Cinnamon Can Help Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers and antioxidants.” A bioflavonoid found in cinnamon called proanthocyanidin, may alter the insulin-signaling activity in your fat cells and thus, help reduce belly fat. Warnings & Scams If taking raw cinnamon powder (which is found in most supplements), you’ll need a minimum of a 1-2 teaspoons a day or 20 Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

People with diabetes often face dietary restrictions to control their blood sugar and prevent complications. Although research is in a preliminary stage, cinnamon may help fight some symptoms of diabetes. It is also unlikely to cause blood pressure spikes, or disrupt blood sugar. So, people with diabetes who miss a sweet pop of flavor may find that cinnamon is a good replacement for sugar. Can cinnamon affect blood sugar? Cinnamon has shown promise in the treatment of blood sugar, as well as some other diabetes symptoms. Research on the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar in diabetes is mixed and in the early stages. Most studies have been very small, so more research is necessary. People with diabetes who are interested in herbal remedies, however, may be surprised to learn that doctors are serious about the potential for cinnamon to address some diabetes symptoms. A 2003 study published in Diabetes Care, compared the effects of a daily intake of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon with a group that received a placebo for 40 days. All three levels of cinnamon intake reduced blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The effects were seen even 20 days after participants were no longer taking cinnamon. A small 2016 study of 25 people, published in the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, found that cinnamon may be beneficial for people with poorly controlled diabetes. Participants consumed 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks. The result was a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine had a different result. The study, which used a more reliable method, had slightly more participants, at 70. The researchers found that 1 g of cinnamon per day for 30 days and 60 days offered no improvements in blo Continue reading >>

17 Reasons To Use Honey And Cinnamon

17 Reasons To Use Honey And Cinnamon

17-reasons-to-use-honey-and-cinnamon People of many cultures have been using honey and cinnamon to treat many different health situations for centuries. Folk wisdom still retains knowledge of the healing properties of both raw honey and cinnamon. 1. ARTHRITIS: Take daily, morning and night, one cup of hot water with two teaspoons honey and one small teaspoon cinnamon powder. If taken regularly even chronic arthritis can be cured. 2. BLADDER INFECTIONS: Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It destroys the germs in the bladder. cinnamon 3. CHOLESTEROL: Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of cinnamon powder mixed in 16 ounces of tea water reduces the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10 percent within two hours. 4. COLDS: Take one tablespoon lukewarm honey with 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon powder daily for three days to cure most chronic cough, cold, and clear the sinuses. 5. HEART DISEASES: Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply on wheat-bread f or daily breakfast to reduce the cholesterol in the arteries and save the patient from heart attack. 6. UPSET STOMACH: Cures stomach ache and also clears stomach ulcers from the root. 7. GAS: If Honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas. 8. IMMUNE SYSTEM: Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacterial and viral. 9. INDIGESTION: Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food relieves acidity and digests the heaviest of meals. 10. INFLUENZA – FLU: honey contains a natural ingredient which kills the influenza germs and saves the patient from flu. 11. LONGEVITY: Take daily, four spoons of honey, one spoon of cinnamon powder, and three cups Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Cinnamon For Diabetes? A Half Teaspoon A Day Could Help Control Cholesterol

Researchers have been investigating a number of powerful natural agents that can help you stabilize your blood sugar, and once again, cinnamon has proven itself as a viable contender in the fight against diabetes, as the study in Diabetic Medicine reveals.(1) One of cinnamon’s most impressive health benefits is its ability to improve blood glucose control. For example, just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day has previously been shown to significantly reduce blood sugar levels, triglycerides, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. (2) The more you can make use of natural therapies such as nutrition and exercise, the better your health will be. However, as helpful as supplements like cinnamon can be, they should not be misconstrued as cures. They are not substitutes for proper diet and lifestyle choices. You cannot properly address your diabetes if you still maintain a sedentary lifestyle and poor dietary choices — cinnamon supplementation or not! How Cinnamon Can Benefit Diabetics Below are five known ways cinnamon can be helpful to your metabolism: 1. Cinnamon can increase your glucose metabolism about 20-fold, which significantly improves blood sugar regulation. (4) 2. Cinnamon has been found to have “insulin-like effects” due to a bioactive compound, qualifying it as a candidate for an insulin substitute. 3. Cinnamon slows the emptying of your stomach to reduce sharp rises in blood sugar following meals, and improves the effectiveness, or sensitivity, of insulin. 4. Cinnamon actually enhances your antioxidant defenses. A study published in 2009 stated, “Polyphenols from cinnamon could be of special interest in people who are overweight with impaired fasting glucose since they might act as both insulin sensitizers a Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice that contains several bioactive agents. Cinnamaldehydes give cinnamon its aroma[1], Coumarins (a toxin) contribute to taste[2], and several compounds including MethylHydroxyChalcone polymers (MHCPs) contribute to its systemic insulin sensitizing benefits.[3] Beyond the three unique compounds listed, cinnamon also contains tannins, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenoids and anthraquinones.[4] Cinnamon exerts beneficial control effects against pro-diabetic diets in a number of ways. Cinnamon can inhibit numerous digestive enzymes, such as alpha-glucosidase[4], sucrase[5] and potentially pancreatic amylase (although the only results were confounded with acarbose).[5] Via inhibition of these enzymes, cinnamon can decrease the influx of glucose into systemic circulation and avoid overly significant insulin spikes. In systemic circulation (beyond the liver) cinnamon also possesses anti-diabetic effects. A compound in cinnamon, methylhydroxychalcone polymer (MHCP), acts as an insulin mimetic on adipocytes.[3][6][7] MHCP's effects as an insulin mimetic are dose dependent, and act by transphosphorlyating the insulin receptor on the cytoplasmic membrance (the same mechanism as the insulin molecule itself). Its effects on glucose uptake and glycogen, however dose-dependent, seem to be time-delayed (When insulin acts within 10 minutes of reaching the cell, MHCPs take 30-60, suggesting an intra-cellular time delay).[3] Cinnamon has also been implicating in aiding insulin function, potentiating its effects more than 20-fold in vitro.[8] When ingested in human trials, cinnamon shows much promise in reducing blood glucose levels[9][10][11] and sometimes markers of lipid metabolism (LDL, Triglycerides, Total cholesterol).[12] There are also intervention studies noting im Continue reading >>

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

Half A Teaspoon Of This Each Day Can Optimize Cholesterol Levels...

A 12-week London study was recently conducted involving 58 type 2 diabetics with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels over 7 percent. Hemoglobin A1c is a marker for long-term glycemic control in diabetics. After 12 weeks on 2g of cinnamon per day, study subjects had significantly lower HbA1c levels, as well as significantly reduced blood pressures (systolic, SBP and diastolic, DBP). The researchers’ conclusion: “Intake of 2g of cinnamon for 12 weeks significantly reduces the HbA1c, SBP and DBP among poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Cinnamon supplementation could be considered as an additional dietary supplement option to regulate blood glucose and blood pressure levels along with conventional medications to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.” In related news, a new study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill points to a connection between magnesium in the diet and lowered risk of diabetes. According to Reuters: “It's plausible that magnesium could influence diabetes risk because the mineral is needed for the proper functioning of several enzymes that help the body process glucose.” Researchers studied magnesium intake and diabetes risk in about 4,500 men and women aged 18 to 30. None of the participants were diabetic at the start of the study. Over the ensuing 20 years, 330 of the test subjects developed diabetes. The people with the highest magnesium intake – about 200 milligrams for every 1,000 calories consumed – were almost 50 percent less likely to develop diabetes than men and women who consumed about 100 milligrams per 1,000 calories. The study also revealed that as magnesium intake increased, inflammation levels decreased, as did insulin resistance. IMPORTANT NOTE: Reuters reports one wildly inaccurate conclusion: that consuming w Continue reading >>

Sugar And Cholesterol Levels

Sugar And Cholesterol Levels

The Best of Cinnamon Cinnamon Reduces Blood Researchers suggest that all adults, not just diabetics, may benefit from its health effects By Aaron W. Jensen, Ph.D. cientists and consumers alike are discovering that there is a tighter link between diet and health—especially in aging populations—than was previously suspected. Although it has long been known that fruits, vegetables, and grains are excellent sources of the vitamins and minerals that are so essential to good health, we continue to learn about the importance of supplementing our diets (no matter how healthful they may be) with additional amounts of certain nutrients. The objectives of nutritional supplementation are fourfold: To compensate for the declining ability of our aging digestive systems to make certain dietary nutrients available to the rest of our bodies—thus preventing potentially harmful deficiencies. To compensate for our aging bodies’ declining ability to produce certain nutrient substances on their own—thus preventing potentially harmful deficiencies. To achieve above-normal levels of some nutrients so as to extract as much health benefit from them as possible—thus helping to prevent chronic diseases. In some cases, to benefit our bodies with valuable nutrients they would otherwise never encounter—thus enhancing our health, and perhaps even our longevity, in various ways. It’s not just vitamins and minerals that occupy the spotlight of nutritional supplementation, but also certain amino acids and hormones, and a growing list of exotic phytochemicals—plant-based compounds that have beneficial effects on various aspects of our physiology. Many such compounds are found in the fruits, vegetables, and grains that we eat routinely, but many more are found in herbs and spices that we Continue reading >>

Take Control Of Your Blood Sugar Levels With Targeted Nutrient Compounds

Take Control Of Your Blood Sugar Levels With Targeted Nutrient Compounds

Over fifty years ago scientists conclusively established that low levels of chromium directly contribute to high blood sugar and pre-diabetic complications.1 Yet today, anywhere between 25-50% of the American population suffers from chromium deficiency.2 This is likely the result of modern commercial farming methods that have depleted the soil of valuable chromium and industrial food processing that depletes natural chromium from whole foods. Compounding the danger is the reality that your body’s capacity to absorb chromium declines with age. These alarming facts highlight a widespread, stealth threat that rampant nutritional insufficiencies may be undermining even the best efforts to optimize blood glucose levels. As Life Extension® members are well aware, excess glucose not only increases degenerative disease risk, but also adversely impacts longevity genes required for extended life span. In published studies, chromium deficiency has been shown to induce early-stage diabetic complications and hasten the onset of full-blown diabetes.3-5 The encouraging news is that a targeted set of novel nutritional compounds has been identified that optimizes your body’s ability to keep a tight rein on glucose levels. In this article, you will learn of a cutting-edge chromium complex that enhances your body’s ability to utilize glucose as you age. You will also discover the proven power of additional nutrients to protect against the system-wide damage inflicted by surplus glucose. Chromium: The Master Blood Sugar Regulator Studies on chromium have consistently demonstrated improvement in blood sugar levels, insulin sensitivity, and lipid profiles.6-9 More recent research reveals how it works: chromium favorably modulates your cells’ internal communication centers (intracell Continue reading >>

Blood-sugar-busting Berberine: A Diabetes Solution

Blood-sugar-busting Berberine: A Diabetes Solution

Type 2 Diabetes (and its root cause: insulin resistance) is truly an epidemic in our society. Thus it’s only a matter of time before every practitioner has at least a handful of clients with blood sugar control issues. The good news is that Type 2 diabetes is absolutely reversible! Long-term healing requires a client to change their diet and lifestyle substantially. And, as you know, some of them just aren’t ready emotionally for that change. It takes time. But in the interim, these clients absolutely need help alleviating the toxic effects of elevated sugar on their organs and glands. As a scientist at heart, I am inherently skeptical of claims of seemingly “magical” effects of herbal remedies. Some are absolutely true, but many are overblown (just as we see with pharmaceutical remedies, marketing claims can be predatory and irresponsible). I want to introduce you, however, to an herbal solution that holds up very well to scrutiny: berberine. Like another herbal powerhouse curcumin, berberine is a plant phytonutrient, specfically an alkaloid. It’s been used for eons as a natural antibiotic. I’ve used it successfully in my practice to help people who choose natural treatment (as opposed to prescription antibiotics) for all sorts of unwelcome microbial infections…bacteria, viruses, yeast, parasites. Berberine is extracted from a number of medicinal herbs, most commonly oregon grape root, barberry, and goldenseal (what you see in the picture above). But that’s only the beginning of berberine’s power. A couple of ground-breaking 2008 clinical studies found that berberine regulates blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes just as well as the blockbuster drug Metformin (and with no measured side effects). No, I am not exaggerating. In peer-reviewed studies in the med Continue reading >>

Can Cinnamon Ease Diabetes Symptoms?

Can Cinnamon Ease Diabetes Symptoms?

Diabetes is a chronic disorder in which your blood sugar, or glucose, is too high. If your blood sugar stays high for long periods, it could be harmful to your health. Possible complications of diabetes include an increased risk of: heart disease stroke kidney disease nerve damage Diet, regular exercise, and medications can ease diabetes symptoms and help you control your blood sugar. Some people also add alternative treatments to their treatment plan. Cinnamon is one alternative treatment that has been explored for diabetes. Check with your doctor before you begin taking any type of dietary supplement. Cinnamon is used widely in cooking, but you can also find it in some people’s medicine cabinets. The spice has been used in traditional medicine for centuries, especially in China, India, and Southeast Asia. Scientific evidence doesn’t always back up the use of cinnamon for medical conditions, but people have used it to treat bronchitis, stomach problems, and diabetes. Using cinnamon to control diabetes symptoms has been studied in recent years. The results vary, but the possibility of using cinnamon as a natural treatment for diabetes is exciting for both researchers and people with the condition. Researchers have studied the effect of cinnamon bark on blood sugar in animals, but they haven’t studied it widely in people. A few studies published in the Annals of Family Medicine and Diabetes Care show that people with type 2 diabetes may benefit from cinnamon. Blood tests show that some people had better control of their sugar levels when they took cinnamon supplements along with their normal treatments. In some cases, cholesterol levels were lower, too. Although cinnamon seems like it may help people with type 2 diabetes, it’s hard to know if the spice can work f Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

Processed foods like cookies, cakes, and candy (and even starchy plant foods like rice, beans, and potatoes) can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. After one meal containing these foods, blood sugar can get so high that insulin can’t keep up. Side effects like fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, trouble concentrating, and frequent urination can result. If you consume high-carbohydrate foods every day, you increase your risk of type 2 diabetes — the medical diagnosis for having chronically high blood sugar levels that are caused by diet and lifestyle. (This is different from type 1 diabetes — a condition where the body produces little to no insulin.) Over 422 million people have diabetes worldwide, and their high blood sugar levels are destroying their bodies. To know if your blood sugar levels are chronically high, many doctors will check your A1C levels. A1C stands for glycated hemoglobin, which is formed when blood sugar attaches to hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). A1C tests measure the percentage of your hemoglobin that has blood sugar attached to it. If blood sugar levels have been high for the past 3 months, then more hemoglobin will be glycated. Thus, A1C testing provides an accurate measurement of how high your blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates pre-diabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. Earlier in this article, we explored how you can raise your blood sugar. Just eat cookies, cakes, rice, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods, and you will be on the fast track toward diabetes. Following this logic, won’t eating fewer carbohydrates lower your blood sug Continue reading >>

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using cinnamon to treat diabetes is something you might have heard of in the last few years. Some diabetics may take cinnamon supplements, while others may just shake the stuff on everything. It’s important to remember that cinnamon is a spice, and all spices can be incredibly beneficial to our health. Not one can save us from anything as serious as diabetes, however adding cinnamon to our foods may offer some benefits to our blood sugar. But how? Why and How Cinnamon May Help During Meals When you eat, your blood glucose rises naturally. This is a normal process in the body, and not harmful … until that insulin doesn’t reach the cells efficiently and your blood glucose stays high all the time. Various reasons can cause this to happen, whether it be too much sugar intake, not enough fiber, too much or any animal protein, a high starchy meal with not enough other nutrients like magnesium and protein to slow down the response, or simply due to blood sugar problems you have currently have. Some other factors that are possible, include a high fat intake from animal or oil fat sources that prevents insulin from reaching the cells, or possibly a diet too low in calories. Skipping meals can also cause problems with blood sugar. Whatever the cause, the important solution is to eat a whole foods diet, lean plant-based proteins, sufficient (but modest) portions of healthy plant-based fats, and as much fiber as your body can tolerate comfortably. Cinnamon works its magic by lowering the insulin response in the body to a degree, and it also contains nutrients that assist in this process as well. Nutrients in Cinnamon That Provide Blood Sugar Support Adding cinnamon to some foods can benefit you for a few reasons. First, it tastes naturally sweet, so it may lower your cravings Continue reading >>

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