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How Long Do You Have To Fast For A Glucose Test?

Why Must The Patients Be Fasting Before A Glucose Tolerance Test?

Why Must The Patients Be Fasting Before A Glucose Tolerance Test?

To be of any use, to be valid, a test should be done strictly according to protocol. One of the parameters is the fasting blood glucose value, which cant be obtained after having eaten/drunk, the peak value and the value 2 hours after ingesting the test dose of glucose can also be higher which all would falsely point to having diabetes when one starts at a higher level because not having fasted, so in short the test would be no good at all. Firstly, I suppose you dont want insulin and glucose already in the blood. Excess glucose messes with your measurements by increasing the chance for the reading to show hyperglycemia, and if there is already insulin in the blood, glucose may enter the cells too quickly and further measurement may give you a false negative. Our bodies homeostatic regulation is efficient and effective, but it doesnt work instantly, and it is that time lag that shakes things up for doctors; the excess variability isnt normally appreciated. Also, note that in periods when blood glucose is high at a sustained level, our bodies induce insulin resistance. Its developed as a protective mechanism to ensure enough glucose goes to the brain (among other things). So in the short term, your measurements may be messed up by the induced transient insulin resistance. You are being tested to see what your bodys reaction is to the ingestion of glucose. To get a meaningful assessment of how your body processes glucose you start fasting, then ingest glucose and then have blood tests periodically to see how well or efficiently your body is processing the glucose you just had. If you are not fasting, your readings are gong to tell how your body, already primed with additional glucose, is processing the new glucose. That information will not be useful to your physician in Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Test

Blood Glucose Test

What is a blood glucose test? A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose, a type of simple sugar, is your body’s main source of energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Glucose testing is primarily done to check for type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that causes your blood glucose level to rise. The amount of sugar in your blood is usually controlled by a hormone called insulin. However, if you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or the insulin produced doesn’t work properly. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Increased levels of blood sugar can lead to severe organ damage if left untreated. In some cases, blood glucose testing may also be used to test for hypoglycemia. This condition occurs when the levels of glucose in your blood are too low. Watch a great review of the iHealth blood glucose meter » Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and teenagers whose bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin. It’s a chronic, or long-term, condition that requires continuous treatment. Late-onset type 1 diabetes has been shown to affect people between the ages of 30 and 40. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in overweight and obese adults, but it can develop in younger people as well. This condition occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or when the insulin you produce doesn’t work properly. The impact of type 2 diabetes may be reduced through weight loss and healthy eating. Gestational diabetes occurs if you develop diabetes while you’re pregnant. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you give birth. After receiving a diagnosis of diabetes, you may have to get blood glucose tests to determin Continue reading >>

Blood Test: Glucose

Blood Test: Glucose

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working. A glucose test measures how much glucose is in the blood. Glucose is a type of sugar used by the body for energy. A glucose test is done to check for low or high levels of glucose. Sometimes it's done as part of a routine checkup to screen for problems, and sometimes because a child has not been feeling well. A low glucose level is called hypoglycemia . A high level of glucose is called hyperglycemia . High glucose levels can point to diabetes . How Should We Prepare for a Glucose Test? Your child may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results. Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction. Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will: put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand) pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a "heel stick collection." After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby's heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a small sample of Continue reading >>

Slideshow: A Visual Guide To Type 2 Diabetes

Slideshow: A Visual Guide To Type 2 Diabetes

If you experience symptoms of severe increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, increased hunger, tingling of your hands or feet -- your doctor may run a test for diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some 29 million children and adults in the U.S., or over 9% of the population, have diabetes today. Yet, millions of Americans are unaware that they have diabetes, because there may be no warning signs. To confirm the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, your doctor will order a fasting plasma glucose test or a casual plasma glucose. The fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) is the preferred method for diagnosing diabetes, because it is easy to do, convenient, and less expensive than other tests, according to the American Diabetes Association. Before taking the blood glucose test, you will not be allowed to eat anything for at least eight hours. During a blood glucose test, blood will be drawn and sent to a lab for analysis. Normal fasting blood glucose -- or blood sugar -- is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL for people who do not have diabetes. The standard diagnosis of diabetes is made when two separate blood tests show that your fasting blood glucose level is greater than or equal to 126 mg/dL. However, if you have normal fasting blood sugar, but you have risk factors for diabetes or symptoms of diabetes, your doctor may decide to do a glucose tolerance test (see below) to be sure that you do not have diabetes. Some people have a normal fasting blood sugar reading, but their blood sugar rapidly rises as they eat. These people may have impaired glucose tolerance. If their blood sugar levels are high enough, they may be diagnosed with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Fasting For Medical Tests

Fasting For Medical Tests

You may be asked to fast by your doctor or nurse. For some medical tests, fasting beforehand gives a more accurate result. For other tests or operations, you need to fast for safety reasons. Your doctor can tell you what to do to prepare for your test. What is fasting? Fasting means not eating and only drinking sips of water. If you are fasting, you can't drink fruit juice, soft drink, coffee, tea or milk, and you can't eat or suck on lollies and chewing gum. Fasting for tests Fasting for blood tests A fasting blood test is usually done in the morning after you have fasted for 8 to 16 hours. Fasting for a gastroscopy You need to fast for 6 hours before a gastroscopy. This is to lower the risk of vomiting up and inhaling what's in your stomach. It also gives the doctor a clear view inside the stomach and intestine. Fasting for a colonoscopy Before a colonoscopy, you eat a low-fibre diet for 2 to 3 days, and have only clear fluids the day before, such as black coffee, apple juice, water or clear jellies. If you have diabetes, make sure you get the right amount of glucose in these fluids. The day before, you also take a medicine to empty your bowel. Finally, for several hours before the procedure you need to fast. Fasting before an anaesthetic If you are being sedated or having a general anaesthetic, your doctor will ask you to stop eating several hours beforehand. You can have small amounts of clear fluids up to 2 hours before. Special considerations for fasting Medication Keep taking your medication as usual before a test, unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. Some medications need to be stopped, so be sure to tell your doctor everything you are taking. Diabetes If you are diabetic and you need to fast: check your blood sugar regularly (every 2 hours for example) y Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

How do you prepare for a blood test? Some blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. In these cases, your doctor will instruct you not to eat or drink anything, except water, in the hours leading up to the test. Fasting before certain blood tests is important to help make sure that your test results are accurate. The vitamins, minerals, fats, carbohydrates, and proteins that make up all food and beverages can impact blood-level readings, clouding the results of your test. Not all blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. Blood tests that you will likely need to fast for include: renal function panel lipoprotein panel If your doctor has prescribed a new blood test for you, or doesn’t mention whether or not you should fast or for how long, ask them if fasting is required. Some tests, such as a fecal occult blood test, don’t require fasting but do limit certain foods. Red meats, broccoli, and even some medications may cause a false positive test. Always follow your doctor’s advice when preparing for a test. The amount of time you need to fast for will vary depending on the test. For most tests, you will be told not to consume anything but water for eight hours leading up to the test. For a few tests, a 12-hour fast may be needed. Schedule your test as early in the day as possible. The hours you spend sleeping are considered part of the fasting period, as long as you don’t break your fast with coffee or food once you’re awake. Even if you drink it black, coffee can interfere with blood test results. That’s because it contains caffeine and soluble plant matter, which might skew your test results. Coffee is also a diuretic, which means that it will increase how much you pee. This can have a dehydrating effect. The less hydrated you are, the harder it Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Before A Gestational Diabetes Test?

Can You Eat Before A Gestational Diabetes Test?

Doctors routinely test pregnant women for gestational diabetes since this condition can harm the baby if it isn't treated. High blood glucose levels may be the only sign of this condition, so this blood test is needed to determine whether a special diet is necessary for the mother to keep the baby safe. Video of the Day There are two types of gestational diabetes tests. The simpler test is the glucose challenge test, which is the first one that the doctor will order. Should this test indicate a possible problem, you will be asked to return for the longer glucose tolerance test, which will more accurately determine whether you have gestational diabetes. Both of these tests involve drinking a measured dose of a high glucose beverage and then having your blood drawn and tested. One hour after drinking the liquid for the glucose challenge test you will have your blood drawn. You are not allowed to eat or drink while waiting for the blood draw. With the glucose tolerance test, you have your blood drawn before drinking the beverage and then every hour for the next three hours. A glucose challenge test result above 130 or 140 mg/dL, depending on the lab, will require you to do the glucose tolerance test at a later date. During this test, your fasting blood glucose level should be below 95 mg/dL, at one hour blood glucose should be below 180 mg/dL, at two hours it should be below 155 mg/dL and at three hours it should be below 140 mg/dL. You will need to make dietary changes and be retested later if your levels are higher than this, and if a repeat of this test also shows abnormal levels you will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The glucose challenge test doesn't require you to fast before having the test, so you should eat normally the day of the test and the day before Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid Before A Glucose Tolerance Test During Pregnancy

Foods To Avoid Before A Glucose Tolerance Test During Pregnancy

Between 26 and 28 weeks of pregnancy, you will have a glucose screening test to check your blood sugar levels. If the screening test results are high, your doctor will perform a glucose tolerance test in order to diagnose gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes puts you and your baby at risk for immediate and long-term health consequences. It is important to follow your doctor’s instructions before the test to ensure an accurate test result and to follow a diet and exercise routine if you are diagnosed with this condition. Video of the Day For your glucose tolerance test, your practitioner will take a fasting blood draw to determine your blood sugar levels. You will then drink a glucose solution, and your blood will be tested once an hour for three hours. You will stay at the doctor’s office the entire time, so bring something to entertain yourself, arrange for child care for older children and have a snack on hand to eat after the blood draws are complete. If two or more of your blood readings are abnormal, you will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Eating the Day of the Test According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, you need to abstain from eating anything for at least eight hours prior to your glucose tolerance test. Eat a healthy meal the night before the test. From then on, you are only allowed sips of water. Typically, this test is scheduled for first thing in the morning, so most of the time you are fasting you are asleep. Consider having someone drive you to and from the test if you’re concerned about low energy levels from fasting. According to MedlinePlus, you can eat your standard diet leading up to the test. You may be advised that you need to eat at least 150 grams of carbohydrates per day for three days leading up to the Continue reading >>

How Long To Fast Before A Blood Test

How Long To Fast Before A Blood Test

Fasting before a blood test is important to obtain accurate readings. When you consume food, your body has to process the food's components as they travel through your bloodstream. Blood tests examine a variety of blood and sugar levels that can be compromised if foreign entities, such as food, contaminate blood, painting an inaccurate picture. Fasting beforehand allows the physician to obtain a clear picture of your bodily functions for an accurate diagnosis. Fasting before a blood test is typically required for fasting glucose, fasting lipid panel, fasting metabolic panel, fasting cholesterol, HDL or triglyceride tests. These tests look for cholesterol and glucose levels in your blood, and any food consumed before the test will provide an inaccurate reading. Your doctor may recommend a certain time period for fasting; however, the standard amount of time is about eight to 12 hours of no food before having blood drawn. Schedule your blood test for early in the morning so you'll only need to fast overnight to meet requirements. Fast for eight hours before a glucose test. The test is typically conducted in the morning while your body is still in a resting place for a more accurate reading. You must fast at least 12 hours before taking a cholesterol blood test to get an accurate reading on triglycerides. The American Heart Association warns against quick cholesterol tests you find in malls and health fairs because fasting is imperative to obtaining an accurate result. Stay hydrated and drink plenty of water. Take any medication that your doctor prescribed to you except for corticosteroids, estrogen or androgens, oral contraceptives, some diuretics, anti-psychotic medications including haloperidol, some antibiotics and niacin. Do not smoke, drink any other liquid than wate Continue reading >>

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood when you have not had anything to eat or drink for several hours. This test is also called a fasting plasma glucose test (FBS). Why is this test done? The most common use of this test is to check for diabetes. How do I prepare for this test? The simplest way to check for diabetes is to check your blood sugar before you've had anything to eat or drink in the morning. In most cases you will fast overnight, eating nothing and drinking nothing but water after your evening meal and in the morning before your blood is drawn. If you do shift work, it's best to have your blood checked after your usual sleeping time (after at least 6 hours of sleep) and before you start your active day. When you wake up, you should have nothing to eat and nothing to drink except water before your blood is drawn. You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Don't stop any of your regular medicines without first consulting with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. How is the test done? Your healthcare provider may poke your finger with a lancet and fill a small tube with the blood. Or a small amount of blood may be taken from your arm with a needle. The blood is sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes. Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test. What does the test result mean? The normal fasting blood sugar range in most labs is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9 to 5.5 millimoles per liter). A fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

A fasting blood glucose test — also called a fasting plasma glucose, or FPG test — measures blood glucose levels after you've gone without food for at least eight hours. It's reliable, and the results aren't affected by your age or the amount of physical activity you do. Many doctors prefer the fasting plasma glucose test because it's easy, fast and inexpensive. Test Procedure To prepare, you must not eat for at least eight hours before the test. The next morning, a healthcare provider takes a single sample of your blood and sends it to a lab for analysis. Fasting blood glucose tests done in the morning, rather than the afternoon, appear to be more accurate in diagnosing diabetes. So be sure to schedule your test for first thing in the morning. Results Your doctor will compare your results against the normal levels for fasting glucose. Normal blood glucose levels are less than 100 mg/dL. (Read as "100 milligrams of glucose for each deciliter of blood." A deciliter is 1/10th of a liter.) Written by award-winning health writer Bobbie Hasselbring Reviewed by Beth Seltzer, MD Last updated June 2008 The Moderated Media - Unbiased presentation of today's breaking news, latest news headlines, analysis, and opinion. View what everyone is talking about from the fastest growing news site on the web. Continue reading >>

Fasting For Blood Tests

Fasting For Blood Tests

It's the morning of your bloodwork and your doctor said to fast before the test. But your stomach is growling and you have serious caffeine withdrawal hours before you roll up your sleeve. A bite of toast and a few gulps of coffee won't really make a difference, right? Not so fast. Your results could come back wrong if you give in to temptation. Fasting means you don't eat or drink anything but water usually for 8 to 12 hours beforehand. So, if your appointment is at 8 a.m. and you're told to fast for 8 hours, only water is okay after midnight. If it's a 12-hour fast, avoid food and drink after 8 p.m. the night before. You also shouldn't smoke, chew gum (even sugarless), or exercise. These things can rev up your digestion, and that can affect your results. Take your prescription medications unless your doctor tells you to skip them. But ask your doctor before you take any over-the-counter drugs. Blood tests help doctors check for certain health problems and find out how well your body is working. Doctors also use them to figure out how well treatments are working. You don't need to fast before all blood tests. Your doctor will tell you if you need to. These tests typically require fasting: Fasting blood glucose measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood to test for diabetes or prediabetes. Typical fasting time: At least 8 hours Lipid profile is used to check the level of cholesterol and other blood fats. High levels put you at risk for developing heart disease or having a stroke. Typical fasting time: 9-12 hours Basic or comprehensive metabolic panel is often part of a routine physical. The tests check your blood sugar, electrolyte and fluid balance, and kidney function. The comprehensive test checks your liver function, too. Typical fasting time: 10-12 hours Continue reading >>

Can I Eat And Drink Before Having A Blood Test?

Can I Eat And Drink Before Having A Blood Test?

It depends on the type of blood test you're having. The healthcare professional arranging your test will tell you if you need to do anything to prepare for it. You can eat and drink as normal before some blood tests. But if you're having a "fasting blood test", you will be told not to eat or drink anything (other than water) beforehand. You may also be told not to smoke before your test. Common fasting blood tests Examples of blood tests that require you to fast include: a fasting blood glucose test (used to test for diabetes) – you fast for 8 to 10 hours before the test an iron blood test (used to diagnose conditions such as iron deficiency anaemia) – you fast for 12 hours before the test For more information about a wider range of blood tests, go to Lab Tests Online. Further information: Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to properly use sugar (glucose) as a source of fuel. As a result, the levels of sugar in the blood become abnormally high. When this condition occurs during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Impact Gestational diabetes affects about 2–10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually begins in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy and goes away after the baby is born. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, obesity, high blood pressure, increasing age and a close relative with diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Ramifications Gestational diabetes can result in complications for mother and baby. Women with gestational diabetes are more likely to get high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia. They have an increased chance of needing a Cesarean delivery. Babies of women who have gestational diabetes are more likely to develop jaundice. They also may grow too large, leading to an increased risk of birth trauma. Complications can be avoided by controlling gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can usually be well controlled through a combination of close monitoring, diet, exercise and occasionally the administration of medication. You will be instructed to go to the lab at your convenience or call to schedule time. The lab will provide the glucose solutions to drink and you will need to remain in the clinic for the duration of the test (about one hour). Gestational Diabetes Screening Test Testing for gestational diabetes is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for gestational diabetes, you may be tested earlier. For accurate results, it is very important that you follow these instructions exactly. You do not need Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Before Going For A Gestational Diabetes Test?

Can You Eat Before Going For A Gestational Diabetes Test?

I am blown away by the posts saying you shouldn't smoke before your gestational diabetes test. IF YOU'RE PREGNANT YOU SHOULDN'T BE SMOKING AT ALL PEOPLE!!!!!!! The one hour glucose test you really dont need to fast because it is not a fasting test. After you drink the glucola you should not have anything to eat or drink, no gum,candy or mints. you also should not go smoke. Cigerattes have glucose in them too. The three hour test you need to fast for 12-14 hours prior because that test is fasting the lab needs a base fasting glucose to compare the rest of the blood after you drink the glucola. With that test you should still have nothing in between the blood draws, even though the taste is very bad. My Dr. said to eat normal, just try to watch your sugar intake the day of the test. You are not supposed to fast. The idea of the test is to see how your body handles the sugar on your normal diet. If you fast, then it's like you are cheating the test. I would rather know for sure that my body is handling the foods I eat properly or if I need to change my diet. Wish me luck...I have my 1 hour test today! OKAY- so for the ONE HOUR glucose test, I definitely recommend fasting. I ate an hour before my one hour test, and my levels came back high. So, I was sent to take the three hour test (which SUCKS!!!! because you have to fast and THEN wait another 3 hours for the test, and you get stuck 3 times which really sucks). Well, my levels came back great that time-because I fasted. I told the nurses who did the three hour that I had not fasted for the one hour, and they said if I had fasted I probably wouldn't have had to do the three hour. So just to save yourself the trouble, I would fast before the first test! I wasn't told not to eat anything before my regular glucose test, so I Continue reading >>

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