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How Is Type 2 Diabetes Treated Medically?

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Treatment: Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy lifestyle choices — including diet, exercise and weight control — provide the foundation for managing type 2 diabetes. However, you may need medications to achieve target blood sugar (glucose) levels. Sometimes a single medication is effective. In other cases, a combination of medications works better. The list of medications for type 2 diabetes is long and potentially confusing. Learning about these drugs — how they're taken, what they do and what side effects they may cause — will help you discuss treatment options with your doctor. Diabetes treatment: Lowering blood sugar Several classes of type 2 diabetes medicines exist. Each class of medicine works in different ways to lower blood sugar. A drug may work by: Stimulating the pancreas to produce and release more insulin Inhibiting the production and release of glucose from the liver Blocking the action of stomach enzymes that break down carbohydrates Improving the sensitivity of cells to insulin Inhibiting the reabsorption of glucose in the kidneys Slowing how quickly food moves through the stomach Each class of medicine has one or more drugs. Some of these drugs are taken orally, while others must be injected. Compare diabetes medications Here's an at-a-glance comparison of common diabetes medications. More medications are available depending on your needs and situation. Ask your doctor about your options and the pros and cons of each. Oral medications Meglitinides Medications Repaglinide (Prandin) Nateglinide (Starlix) Action Stimulate the release of insulin Advantages Work quickly Possible side effects Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Weight gain Nausea or vomiting, when interacting with alcohol Sulfonylureas Medications Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase) Action S Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Learn how to manage type 2 diabetes. In this section, you'll learn about: This section focuses on the medical management of type 2 diabetes. And as the term “ medical management” implies, this management is done with the guidance of your medical provider and medical team. The key principles of medical management are: Regular blood sugar (and ketone) self monitoring as a part of daily living Taking diabetes medications such as pills, injected medicines or even insulin Problem solving how and when to make adjustments in your medication doses to prevent high or low blood sugars Understanding complications and how to screen for, prevent and treat them Good management requires all of these elements. All the elements are intertwined. For example, you need to monitor your blood sugar to know if your treatment is successful. You need to problem solve if the self blood sugar monitoring shows your treatment is not successful. The self blood sugar monitoring will indicate if you need to start, adjust the dose or change the type of diabetes medications. Regular screening for diabetes-related complications may pick up a complication that is in the early stages, and early treatment usually gives the best results. In this section, you will find: Self-management solutions: How to analyze what is causing you to have low blood sugars and/or high blood sugars There are different problem solving sections depending upon your type of treatment: Complications: Reviews diabetic complications –both ones that develop rapidly (acutely) or slowly (chronically) – how to recognize them, and what to do if they occur. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatments

Type 2 Diabetes Treatments

You have lots of options to manage diabetes. Diet, exercise, and medication work together to bring your blood sugar under control. Your doctor will help you figure out if you need to take medicine, which kind is right for you, and how often you should take it. Over your lifetime, you'll probably handle your disease in different ways. Sometimes medications stop working, and you'll have to switch. You'll need to adjust to changes in your body as you age. And researchers are looking for new diabetes medicines and ways to treat it. Check Your Blood Sugar Your blood glucose number tells you how well your treatment is working. Your doctor will let you know how many times a day you need to check it. It depends on what diabetes medications you're taking. When you're sick, you'll have to check your ketones, too. Diet and Exercise There's no one-size-fits-all diabetes diet. You'll need to pay attention to carbs, fiber, fat, and salt to manage your blood sugar and avoid complications of diabetes. How much and when you eat are important, too. Talk to your diabetes team or a registered dietitian to help you plan your meals and snacks. Physical activity -- from working out to doing chores -- lowers your blood sugar. It helps your cells use insulin. It also helps your muscles use glucose. Make sure you check your blood sugar before and after exercise. Eating right and being active help you lose extra pounds and stay at a healthy weight. That will also help control your blood sugar. Pills Oral medications are often the first kind of medicine people with type 2 diabetes try when diet and exercise alone aren't enough to keep their blood sugar in a healthy range. There are many of them, and they work in different ways. A drug doctors often prescribe tells your liver to hang on to some of Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Your best days lay aheadand thats why were here. Maybe youve just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Or maybe youve been living with it for awhile. Heres the thing: your journey is unique and it starts fresh every day. No matter where you are with type 2 diabetes, there are some things you should know. It's the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 means that your body doesn't use insulin properly. And while some people can control their blood sugar levels with healthy eating and exercise, others may need medication or insulin to manage it. Regardless, you have everything you need to fight it. Theres no one-size-fits-all treatment for type 2, but we can help you take each step forward. You have tools. You have resources, friends, and healthcare providers. Whatever step you take next, know that you won't take it alone. Fitness is a key part of managing type 2. And the good news, all you have to do is get moving. You dont have to become an ultra-marathoner. You can start slowly with a walk around the block or a simple bike ride. The key is to find activities you love and do them as often as you can. Work with your doctor to determine what level of physical activity you should engage in Figure out how much time per day you can devote to exercise Set fitness goalshaving clear goals can help you stay motivated Consider where youll start working outthe gym, in your neighborhood, in a park? Build different activitiesinto your daily routine Keep track of what you do and stay focused on your goals Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that results from an inability of the body to properly use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes, in which the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two different days establishes the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of both oral and injectable medications have been developed fo A hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) level of 6.5% or greater indicates diabetes. Managing type 2 diabetes includes following a healthy eating plan and exercise, as well as medications in many cases. r the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A healthy eating plan and regular physical activity are important components of a type 2 diabetes treatment plan. There is no one recommended "diabetes diet" for all people with type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity and modest weight loss can help reduce or prevent type 2 diabetes. Common complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage. A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is an elevated level of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to utilize glucose for energy. Insulin is produced by specialized cells in the pancreas. An elevated level of blood glucose is known as hyperglycemia. The excessive levels of glucose in the blood spill over into the urine, leading to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria). Type 2 diabetes is an enormous public health problem. It is estimated that about 29.1 million Americans (9.1% of all Americans) have Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Most people need medicine to control their type 2 diabetes. Medicine helps keep your blood sugar level as normal as possible to prevent health problems. You'll have to take it for the rest of your life. Diabetes usually gets worse over time, so your medicine or dose may need to change. Adjusting your diet and being active is also necessary to keep your blood sugar level down. Diabetes medicines help lower the amount of sugar in your blood. There are many types of medicine for type 2 diabetes. It can take time to find a medicine and dose that's right for you. You'll usually be offered a medicine called metformin first. If your blood sugar levels aren't lower within 3 months, you may need another medicine. Over time, you may need a combination of medicines. Your GP or diabetes nurse will recommend the medicines most suitable for you. Insulin isn't often used for type 2 diabetes in the early years. It's only needed when other medicines no longer work. Diabetes UK has more information about taking medicines for type 2 diabetes . Your GP or diabetes nurse will explain how to take your medicine and how to store it. If you need to inject insulin or medicine called gliptins, they'll show you how. Your diabetes medicine may cause side effects. These can include: If you feel unwell after taking medicine or notice any side effects, speak to your GP or diabetes nurse. Don't stop taking medication without getting advice. How to get free prescriptions for diabetes medication You're entitled to free prescriptions for your diabetes medication. To claim your free prescriptions, you'll need to apply for an exemption certificate. To do this: you should get the certificate in the post about a week later it will last for 5 years take it to your pharmacy with your prescriptions Save your re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Treatment of type 2 diabetes includes both self-care by the patient and medical care provided by physicians and other healthcare providers. Diabetes treatment generally includes: Medications Nutrition therapy Physical activity Lifestyle measures to manage stress and other issues Specialist care to prevent and treat complications Bariatric surgery Type 2 Diabetes Medications Many people with type 2 diabetes start with the oral drug metformin to help control blood sugar levels, and then add other drugs to the regimen, either soon after diagnosis or months or years later. There are currently more than 10 classes of diabetes drugs, each of which lowers blood sugar in a different way. If your current drug regimen isn't lowering blood sugar enough, your doctor may elect to add a drug from a different class. Most people with type 2 diabetes will also eventually need to use insulin. Some will need to take one or two doses of long-acting insulin per day, such as Lantus (insulin glargine) or Levemir (insulin detemir), and others will need to take long-acting insulin with rapid-acting insulin, such as Humalog (insulin lispro) or Novolog (insulin aspart) before meals. Sulfonylureas and Meglitinides Sulfonylurea medications have also been used for many years to help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar. These drugs "cause the insulin-producing [cells of the pancreas] to produce insulin almost constantly, which means they [increase the] risk for low blood sugar and for weight gain," says Daniel Einhorn, MD, vice president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. "But, they are inexpensive and they are effective, and have been used for a long time," he adds. Examples of sulfonylureas include: Another group of medications that stimulate insulin-produci Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Treatment Advances In Type 2 Diabetes | Healthgrades.com

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Treatment Advances In Type 2 Diabetes | Healthgrades.com

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in the United States. With type 2 diabetes being the most common form of the disease, its a priority to make progress in its treatment. And researchers have done just that. This is good news if youor a loved onehave type 2 diabetes. Here are some exciting advances in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually comes to mind with insulin. But most people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need to use it. People with type 2 diabetes account for most insulin use due to their sheer numbers. Approximately 30% of type 2 diabetes patients use insulin. So making advances in insulin treatment benefits many people with type 2 diabetes. After you receive a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, your doctor will work with you to determine the best method of treatment, be it medication or insulin injections. But, as Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains, the most effective treatment for type 2 diabetes? Proper diet and exercise. Medical Reviewer: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS Last Review Date: Aug 13, 2015 2018Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproducedor reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Useof this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. If fact, people who are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and whose pancreas can still make insulin, can actually reverse their diabetes by immediately starting short-term insulin and a strict diet and exercise program. In the last 10 years, new types of insulin have come to market. Most are variations of the usual rapid-, short- or long-acting injectable insulin. One very recent newcomer is a totally different form of insulinAfrezza inhaled human insulin. You take this type of insulin by breathing it Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes Treatment

Type 1 diabetes is managed with insulin replacement through lifelong insulin injections (up to 6 every day) or delivery of insulin through a pump, by following a healthy diet and eating plan, taking regular exercise and monitoring of blood glucose levels regularly (up to 6 times every day or as directed by a doctor or diabetes educator). The aim of treating your diabetes is to keep blood glucose levels as close to ‘normal’ as possible, that is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (fasting). Keeping blood glucose levels in a healthy range will help prevent both short-term and long-term complications. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners recommends that if you have type 2 diabetes and take oral medication only, you should talk to your doctor or specialist about the need to test your blood sugar levels at home. For further information, visit the Choosing Wisely Australia website. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes initially be managed through lifestyle modification including a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, as the disease progresses, people with type 2 diabetes are often prescribed tablets to control their blood glucose levels. These tablets are intended to be used in conjunction with healthy eating and regular physical activity, not as a substitute. Diabetes tablets are not an oral form of insulin and they require insulin to be present in the body to be effective. Eventually it may be necessary to start taking insulin to control blood glucose levels, when your body is no longer producing enough insulin of its own. Sometimes tablets may be continued in addition to insulin. In type 2 diabetes, as in type 1, the aim of management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to ‘normal’ as possible, that is between 4 to 6 mmol/L (fasting), as this will help prev Continue reading >>

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Treated? | Patient

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Treated? | Patient

Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control and physical activity You can usually improve your blood sugar (glucose) control if you: Eat a healthy balanced diet. Your practice nurse and/or a dietician will give details on how to eat a healthy diet. The diet is the same as recommended for everyone. The idea that you need special foods if you have diabetes is a myth. Basically, you should aim to eat a diet low in fat, high in fibre and with plenty of fruit and vegetables. Read more about type 2 diabetes diet for healthy eating . Lose weight if you are overweight . Getti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 treatment facts Controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels is the major goal of diabetes treatment, in order to prevent complications of the disease. Type 2 diabetes may be managed with non-insulin medications, insulin, weight reduction, or dietary changes. The choice of medications for type 2 diabetes is individualized, taking into account: the effectiveness and side effect profile of each medication, the patient's underlying health status, any medication compliance issues, and cost to the patient or health-care system. Medications for type 2 diabetes can work in different ways to reduce blood glucose levels. They may: increase insulin sensitivity, increase glucose excretion, decrease absorption of carbohydrates from the digestive tract, or work through other mechanisms. Medications for type 2 diabetes are often used in combination. Proper nutrition is a part of any diabetes care plan. There is no one specific "diabetic diet" that is recommended for all individuals. Pancreas transplantation is an area of active study for the treatment of diabetes. What is the treatment for diabetes? The major goal in treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to control blood sugar (glucose) levels within the normal range, with minimal excursions to low or high levels. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is treated: Oral medications are prescribed when these measures fail to control the elevated blood sugars of type 2 diabetes. If oral medications become ineffective treatment with insulin is initiated. Adherence to a diabetic diet is a critical aspect of controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. When considering an ideal diabetic diet, a number of factors must be taken into consideration, including the amount and type of carbohydrates consumed as well as the amount of fib Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitustreatment & Management

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitustreatment & Management

Type 2 Diabetes MellitusTreatment & Management Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... The goals in caring for patients with diabetes mellitus are to eliminate symptoms and to prevent, or at least slow, the development of complications. Microvascular (ie, eye and kidney disease) risk reduction is accomplished through control of glycemia and blood pressure; macrovascular (ie, coronary, cerebrovascular, peripheral vascular) risk reduction, through control of lipids and hypertension, smoking cessation, and aspirin therapy; and metabolic and neurologic risk reduction, through control of glycemia. New abridged recommendations for primary care providers The American Diabetes Association has released condensed recommendations for Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes: Abridged for Primary Care Providers , highlighting recommendations most relevant to primary care. The abridged version focusses particularly on the following aspects: Diagnosis and treatment of vascular complications Intensification of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes The recommendations can be accessed at American Diabetes Association DiabetesPro Professional Resources Online, Clinical Practice Recommendations 2015 . [ 121 ] Type 2 diabetes care is best provided by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in diabetes, working in collaboration with the patient and family. [ 2 ] Management includes the following: Appropriate self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) Ideally, blood glucose should be maintained at near-normal levels (preprandial levels of 90-130 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c] levels < 7%). However, focus on glucose alone does not provide adequate treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment involves multiple goals (ie, Continue reading >>

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