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How Is Blood Sugar Maintained

Is It Acceptable To Eat Food Before Sleeping To Maintain Blood Sugar At A More Constant Level?

Is It Acceptable To Eat Food Before Sleeping To Maintain Blood Sugar At A More Constant Level?

If you are not diabetic or are not otherwise diagnosed with any form of chronic hypoglycemia, you should not be concerned with having a low blood sugar overnight. Being hungry after waking from an 8+ hour sleep is normal (I cannot speak to having an "outsize craving"). Diabetics, at least those with type 1, who may be prone to having low overnight blood sugars should take one or more steps including lowering insulin pump basal rates (or reducing the dosage of long-term acting insulin such as Lantus) or, indeed, eating a relatively small carbohydrate meal (with the corresponding dosage of short acting insulin), preferably combined with protein, which will produce a more extended uptake of the carbohydrate and prevent a hyperglycemic spike. Let's start with the most important thing: If you are diabetic, hypoglycemic or otherwise should be in a doctor's care, you ought to be seeking your doctors advice on this question. The answer you choose to follow can have wide ranging effects. If you desire a second opinion, research health professionals and seek their expertise. That said, if you are not suffering an imbalance, read on. For most people when you eat is less important that what you eat, and what you eat should consider what you are doing today. If you are riding a 200 mile bike race, carbs are great for you today. You will need the energy. If you will be watching the ball game and working on the computer, maybe you will want to eat a little differently. In the end, though, this is all about utilizing the calories you eat. If you are maintaining balance between calories in and energy expended, blood sugar will take care of itself as your metabolism efficiently handles its primary responsibility of converting the calories you consume into energy. When you choose to eat i Continue reading >>

What Happens To Sugar Levels In The Blood While Fasting?

What Happens To Sugar Levels In The Blood While Fasting?

Blood sugar levels are considered to be normal if they fall between 70 and 140 mg/dl. However, if serum glucose levels fall below 70 mg/dl, hypoglycemia or low blood sugar can occur. Not eating enough is a common cause of low blood sugar. A person may experience symptoms such as hunger, rapid heartbeat, trembling, sweating and shakiness when blood sugar drops too low. Depending on whether low blood sugar is mild or moderate, headache, mental confusion and seizures can also occur. Severe low blood sugar can lead to seizures, loss of consciousness, coma, brain damage and even death. In cases of short-term fasting, glucose levels in the blood should rise after eating a meal. A study published in a 2005 issue of "Clinical Nutrition” concluded that fasting is not a healthy way for people to diet. Researchers found that diabetics and overweight individuals without diabetes had problems with insulin and blood sugar after 60 hours of fasting. Video of the Day The digestive system is responsible for breaking food down into glucose, which is the body’s primary source of energy. Glucose then travels in the bloodstream to cells throughout the body. This causes a rise in blood sugar levels. The pancreas releases insulin to aid cells in absorbing glucose for energy. For individuals with Type 2 diabetes who are insulin resistant, the cells do not respond to insulin the way they should. Excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream resulting in high blood sugar levels. But when a person does not eat, the body runs out of fuel, and blood sugar levels drop. In order to keep blood glucose levels stable, you need to eat several meals throughout the day. When the body is in a fasting state, it relies on stored energy. This energy comes from glycogen, protein and fat tissue. Glycogen store Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Regulation

Blood Glucose Regulation

Blood glucose regulation involves maintaining blood glucose levels at constant levels in the face of dynamic glucose intake and energy use by the body. Glucose, shown in figure 1 is key in the energy intake of humans. On average this target range is 60-100 mg/dL for an adult although people can be asymptomatic at much more varied levels. In order to maintain this range there are two main hormones that control blood glucose levels: insulin and glucagon. Insulin is released when there are high amounts of glucose in the blood stream. Glucagon is released when there are low levels of glucose in the blood stream. There are other hormones that effect glucose regulation and are mainly controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. Blood glucose regulation is very important to the maintenance of the human body. The brain doesn’t have any energy storage of its own and as a result needs a constant flow of glucose, using about 120 grams of glucose daily or about 60% of total glucose used by the body at resting state. [1] With out proper blood glucose regulation the brain and other organs could starve leading to death. Insulin A key regulatory pathway to control blood glucose levels is the hormone insulin. Insulin is released from the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans found in the pancreas. Insulin is released when there is a high concentration of glucose in the blood stream. The beta cells know to release insulin through the fallowing pathway depicted in figure 2. [2,3]Glucose enters the cell and ATP is produce in the mitochondria through the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. This increase in ATP causes channels to closes. These channels allow potassium cations to flow into the cell. [2,3,]With these channels closed the inside of the cell becomes more negative causin Continue reading >>

What Diet Works Best To Manage Diabetes?

What Diet Works Best To Manage Diabetes?

Imagine having endless energy that doesn't seem to fade over the course of a day. More and more, research is demonstrating that our blood sugar levels are vitally important in maintaining high levels of energy and supporting a number of important functions in the body. Fortunately, through diet and exercise, you can control blood sugar levels - avoiding unwanted blood sugar spikes, reducing energy level crashes, and lowering your risk for diabetes. Blood sugar, or blood glucose, is the sugar that travels in the blood and provides energy to the body; this sugar comes directly from the food we eat. Typically, a normal, non-diabetic’s healthy blood sugar level is between 70 and 120; it is common for blood sugar to rise after eating, returning to normal levels in an hour or two. If you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA)[1] advises keeping your blood sugar levels before meals from 80–130 mg/dl and your levels 1–2 hours after meals under 180. Many people with diabetes and doctors shoot for levels closer to those of people without diabetes, because they are more protective against complications. Lower numbers require more careful diet and more frequent monitoring to prevent lows, but they are doable for many people. As we consume carbohydrates, they are broken down into glucose, the body’s main source of energy; glucose goes right into the bloodstream. At nearly the same time, the pancreas releases a substance called insulin. Insulin carries glucose from the blood into the cells. glucose needs insulin in order to enter cells; think of insulin as key that unlocks each cell’s front door. Once in a cell, glucose is used to make adenosine triphosphate (ATP), also known as energy. The body stores excess glucose in the liver and in the muscles. As it is Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Blood sugar, or glucose, is an important source of energy and provides nutrients to your body's organs, muscles and nervous system. The body gets glucose from the food you eat, and the absorption, storage and production of glucose is regulated constantly by complex processes involving the small intestine, liver and pancreas. Normal blood sugar varies from person to person, but a normal range for fasting blood sugar (the amount of glucose in your blood six to eight hours after a meal) is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. For most individuals, the level of glucose in the blood rises after meals. A normal blood-sugar range after eating is between 135 and 140 milligrams per deciliter. These variations in blood-sugar levels, both before and after meals, are normal and reflect the way that glucose is absorbed and stored in the body. After you eat, your body breaks down the carbohydrates in food into smaller parts, including glucose, which can be absorbed by the small intestine. As the small intestine absorbs glucose, the pancreas releases insulin, which stimulates body tissues and causes them to absorb this glucose and metabolize it (a process known as glycogenesis). This stored glucose (glycogen) is used to maintain healthy blood-sugar levels between meals. When glucose levels drop between meals, the body takes some much-needed sugar out of storage. The process is kicked off by the pancreas, which releases a hormone known as glucagon, which promotes the conversion of stored sugar (glycogen) in the liver back to glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream. When there isn't enough glucose stored up to maintain normal blood-sugar levels, the body will even produce its own glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (such as amino acids and glycerol). This pro Continue reading >>

What Should Be Our Routine And Food To Maintain Our Blood Sugar?

What Should Be Our Routine And Food To Maintain Our Blood Sugar?

High blood sugar and high blood pressure are metabolic disorders. These along with obesity and heart disease are caused due to low resting metabolic rate. Meaning thereby that our body is not able to generate enough energy for proper functioning of our vital organs. To maintain the blood sugar at healthy levels do the following - Hydration dehydration cycles will help in balancing every mineral and walking and rest routines will increase the RMR which will help in permanent cure of mineral imbalance in the long run. Read my blog for more details and / Or watch my you tube videos at - rajinder bhalla **In brief hydration dehydration cycles is as given here -** Day 1 - Drink 150 ml water every hour from 7 am to 6 pm. Reduce meal size by 20%. No other fluid/ liquid. Day 2,3 - Drink 150 ml water 1 hour before each meal. Total fluid intake 450 ml in the day. Reduce meal size by 20%. Repeat for 2–3 weeks. **To get best results increase Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) as well by doing the following** Walk for 5 minutes at easy pace within your home in the morning. Reduce the meal size by 20%. After walking rest for 15 minutes in bed. Repeat the above 3 times in the morning and 3 times at night before sleeping.The more you rest after walking it will be better. The recommendation of 10 minutes is keeping in view busy schedule of people. 30 minutes is ideal. For explanation of the above read my blog. Continue reading >>

Homeostasis Of Glucose Levels: Hormonal Control And Diabetes

Homeostasis Of Glucose Levels: Hormonal Control And Diabetes

Homeostasis According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are almost 26 million people in the United States alone that have diabetes, which is 8.3% of the total U.S. population. With so many Americans suffering from diabetes, how do we treat all of them? Do all of these people now need insulin shots, or are there other ways to treat, or prevent, diabetes? In order to answer these questions, we must first understand the fundamentals of blood glucose regulation. As you may remember, homeostasis is the maintenance of a stable internal environment within an organism, and maintaining a stable internal environment in a human means having to carefully regulate many parameters, including glucose levels in the blood. There are two major ways that signals are sent throughout the body. The first is through nerves of the nervous system. Signals are sent as nerve impulses that travel through nerve cells, called neurons. These impulses are sent to other neurons, or specific target cells at a specific location of the body that the neuron extends to. Most of the signals that the human body uses to regulate body temperature are sent through the nervous system. The second way that signals can be sent throughout the body is through the circulatory system. These signals are transmitted by specific molecules called hormones, which are signaling molecules that travel through the circulatory system. In this lesson, we'll take a look at how the human body maintains blood glucose levels through the use of hormone signaling. Homeostasis of Blood Glucose Levels Glucose is the main source of fuel for the cells in our bodies, but it's too big to simply diffuse into the cells by itself. Instead, it needs to be transported into the cells. Insulin is a hormone produced by the panc Continue reading >>

How To Maintain A Healthy Blood Sugar

How To Maintain A Healthy Blood Sugar

Blood sugar problems don't happen overnight. And, as your blood sugar rises, not only does your risk of developing diabetes increase, but so does your risk of coronary heart disease. But, there are things you can do to keep your blood sugar levels within a healthy range. 10 things you can to do to maintain a healthy blood sugar 1. Take a 30-minute walk every day. Come on, if you have time to watch Friends reruns, you have time for a walk. Strengthening your muscles makes them more receptive to insulin—and helps them use more glucose. 2. Eat several small meals throughout the day rather than three large meals. You'll avoid the blood sugar ups and downs that can come when stuffed or starving. 3. Fixate on fiber. The more fiber in your diet—from whole grains, whole fruits and vegetables, beans and legumes—the slower carbohydrates are digested and the steadier glucose moves into your bloodstream. You'll avoid blood sugar spikes and you may even find you lose a few pounds: fiber fills you up, but because it's not digested, it doesn't fill you out. 4. Sprinkle some cinnamon on your high-fiber breakfast cereal, whole-grain toast or skim-milk cottage cheese. Cinnamon helps make insulin more effective while stimulating production of enzymes that burn up glucose. 5. Start your day with a grapefruit. One study found that eating half a grapefruit with each meal for 12 weeks not only helped participants lose an average of 3.6 pounds, but reduced insulin and glucose levels after each meal, suggesting their cells were better at using both substances. 6. Drink your milk. Even if you're overweight, dairy foods can significantly reduce your risk of insulin resistance thanks to proteins and enzymes in milk that slow the transformation of food sugar to blood sugar. Turns out every da Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Regulation

Blood Glucose Regulation

Glucose is needed by cells for respiration. It is important that the concentration of glucose in the blood is maintained at a constant level. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates glucose levels in the blood. How glucose is regulated Glucose level Effect on pancreas Effect on liver Effect on glucose level too high insulin secreted into the blood liver converts glucose into glycogen goes down too low insulin not secreted into the blood liver does not convert glucose into glycogen goes up Use the animation to make sure you understand how this works. You have an old or no version of flash - you need to upgrade to view this funky content! Go to the WebWise Flash install guide Glucagon – Higher tier The pancreas releases another hormone, glucagon, when the blood sugar levels fall. This causes the cells in the liver to turn glycogen back into glucose which can then be released into the blood. The blood sugar levels will then rise. Now try a Test Bite- Higher tier. Diabetes is a disorder in which the blood glucose levels remain too high. It can be treated by injecting insulin. The extra insulin allows the glucose to be taken up by the liver and other tissues, so cells get the glucose they need and blood-sugar levels stay normal. There are two types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin. It can be controlled by: monitoring the diet injecting insulin People with type 1 diabetes have to monitor their blood sugar levels throughout the day as the level of physical activity and diet affect the amount of insulin required. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is caused by a person becoming resistant to insulin. It can be controlled by diet and exercise. There is a link between rising levels of obesity (chronic overweight) and i Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Control (blood Sugar Levels)

Blood Glucose Control (blood Sugar Levels)

Introduction to blood sugar levels Our blood glucose level, or blood sugar level, is the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. The amount of glucose in the blood is measured in millimoles per litre (mmol/l). Glucose levels are measured most commonly to diagnose or to monitor diabetes. It is also important to keep an eye on blood glucose levels during certain situations – for example: during pregnancy, pancreatitis and with increasing age. Normally, blood sugar levels stay within a narrow range during the day. A good level is between 4 to 8mmol/l. After you consume food, your blood sugar level will rise and after you have had a night’s rest, they will usually be lowest in the morning. Diabetes is a common disease in our society, affecting 2-5% of the general population, with many more people unaware that they may be affected by this condition. Diabetes results from a lack of insulin, or insensitivity of the body towards the level of insulin present. Thus if you have diabetes, your blood sugar level may move outside the normal limits. Why is controlling blood sugar levels so important? Carbohydrate foods are the body’s main energy source. When they are digested, they break down to form glucose in the bloodstream. If you make sure you eat regular meals, spread evenly throughout the day, you will help maintain your energy levels without causing large rises in your blood sugar levels. It is also important to maintain a stable and balanced blood sugar level, as there is a limited range of blood sugar levels in which the brain can function normally. Regular testing of your blood sugar levels allows you to monitor your level of control and assists you in altering your diabetes management strategy if your levels aren’t within the expected/recommended range. Long term c Continue reading >>

How Do I Maintain Blood Sugar Level During Ramadan?

How Do I Maintain Blood Sugar Level During Ramadan?

Are you diabetic and are on anti-diabetic medication? if yes, then you need to talk to your doctor about adjusting your dosage during the holy month as you will be fasting for a better part of the day. I also suggest that you eat in moderation when breaking your fast. in fact, intermittent fasting is a great way in itself to control your blood sugar levels. Many practitioners of functional medicine believe that fasting is an effective strategy for reversal of type 2 diabetes. Check out this article for how fasting is helpful in type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

How The Body Controls Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

How The Body Controls Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

The bloodstream carries glucose-a type of sugar produced from the digestion of carbohydrates and other foods-to provide energy to cells throughout the body. Unused glucose is stored mainly in the liver as glycogen. Insulin, glucagon, and other hormone levels rise and fall to keep blood sugar in a normal range. Too little or too much of these hormones can cause blood sugar levels to fall too low (hypoglycemia) or rise too high (hyperglycemia). Normally, blood glucose levels increase after you eat a meal. When blood sugar rises, cells in the pancreas release insulin, causing the body to absorb glucose from the blood and lowering the blood sugar level to normal. When blood sugar drops too low, the level of insulin declines and other cells in the pancreas release glucagon, which causes the liver to turn stored glycogen back into glucose and release it into the blood. This brings blood sugar levels back up to normal. Continue reading >>

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Your Video is Loading Guess what percentage of dieters keeps the weight off for more than two years: 75%? 60%? 50%? The sad truth is only 15-20% of dieters keep the weight off, with 80-85% of people who lose weight regaining it (plus some!) after two years. It’s time to shift your mindset when it comes to dieting. By focusing less on fads and more on maintaining a healthy balance of what you eat, you’ll impact your body on a level most diets don’t even consider: Stabilizing your blood sugar. Your blood sugar level is the amount of glucose from what you eat that’s circulating in your bloodstream to provide energy to cells immediately or be stored for future use. A well-balanced blood sugar level is crucial to your overall fitness and well-being, regulating your hormones, triggering your body to burn stored fat, and increasing your metabolism to help you lose weight. Unfortunately, most people’s blood sugar is not properly balanced. If you’re getting too much glucose, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which your body can’t break down and stores as fat. Ironically, not getting enough sugar can also lead to putting on extra pounds! Eating too little glucose can lead to a low blood sugar level, causing your body to go into “starvation mode” where it burns your lean muscle instead of the fat – a double whammy to your system and your diet. Fortunately, nutritionist Mark MacDonald and Dr. Oz have a 6-step plan to balance your blood sugar, allowing you to lose weight and keep it off! Step 1: Eat in 3s What’s the key to eating in 3s? It’s easy! Eat every 3 hours, and divide your plate into thirds: one-third protein, one-third fat, and one-third carbs. Our bodies “want” to eat every 3 hours, as it’s their natural eating schedule dating back from ea Continue reading >>

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

After you eat, your blood sugar levels increase and trigger the release of insulin, an important hormone in managing how your body uses glucose. Different types of nutrients affect blood sugar differently, and maintaining an appropriate intake of carbohydrates, proteins and fats will help control blood sugar levels and prevent or manage metabolic diseases like Type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrates, proteins and fats are the three macronutrients your body needs. Carbohydrates are primarily used for energy, while proteins are important for rebuilding tissue, and fats are important for maintaining cell membranes and facilitating vitamin absorption, among other functions. Carbohydrates have the most significant impact on blood sugar, so carbohydrate intake should be monitored closely by individuals with or at risk for Type 2 diabetes. Protein's Effects on Blood Sugar Compared to carbohydrates, protein keeps blood sugar levels steady. When consumed alone, protein does not generate a rise in blood sugar. According to a study published in 2003 in “American Society for Clinical Nutrition,” individuals with Type 2 diabetes who maintained a 30:40:30 intake ratio of protein to carbohydrates to fat showed a 40 percent lower blood sugar response than those who maintained a 15:55:30 intake ratio. This suggests that protein is neutral food for blood sugar levels and can replace at least some carbohydrates to yield a better overall blood sugar response. Fat's Effects on Blood Sugar Like protein, fat has significantly less impact on blood sugar than carbohydrates. When consumed alone, ingested fats have no bearing on the concentration of circulating blood sugar. Replacing some carbohydrate content with healthy dietary fats could therefore result in steadier overall levels of blood sugar. M Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar levels are racing up and down like a roller coaster, it's time to get off the ride. Big swings in your blood sugar can make you feel lousy. But even if you aren't aware of them, they can still increase your risk for a number of serious health problems. By making simple but specific adjustments to your lifestyle and diet, you can gain better blood-sugar control. Your body uses the sugar, also known as glucose, in the foods you eat for energy. Think of it as a fuel that keeps your body moving throughout the day. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Type 2 diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and can damage nerves and blood vessels. This increase of blood sugar also increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Over time, high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can lead to more health problems, including kidney failure and blindness. "Keeping blood sugar stable can help prevent the long-term consequences of fluctuations," says Melissa Li-Ng, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Dr. Li-Ng explains that high blood sugar can cause a number of symptoms that include: Fatigue Increased thirst Blurry vision Frequent urination It's also important to know that you can have high blood sugar and still feel fine, but your body can still suffer damage, Li-Ng says. Symptoms of high blood sugar typically develop at levels above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). "You can have high blood sugar that's between 150 and 199 and feel perfectly fine," Li-Ng says. Over time, your body can also get used to chronically high blood sugar levels, so you don’t feel the symptoms, she says. On the flip side, if you Continue reading >>

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