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How High Is Too High For Blood Sugar

14 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

14 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

When we hear people discussing high blood sugar levels, the first thing most of us think of is diabetes. Diabetes is an extremely serious condition but long before someone is diagnosed with it, their body will show signs that their blood sugar levels are too high. By educating ourselves on these signs of high blood sugar, we can avoid causing irreversible damage to our bodies. The consumption of glucose through our diet is the most likely cause of elevated sugar levels. Glucose is distributed to every cell in the body and is an essential nutrient (in the right sized doses). However, when the levels of glucose become too high for too long, serious damage is caused to your kidneys, blood vessels, nerves, and eyes. With processed and artificial food making up a significant portion of many people’s diet, the number of people suffering from high blood sugar is increasing. The only way to protect yourself and your loved ones is to begin reading the signs. Play Video Play Mute 0:00 / 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE 0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualSc Continue reading >>

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

Have you ever tried to fly a remote control airplane or helicopter? If you steer too sharply one way, your plane will crash into the ground. And if you go too far in the opposite direction, the plane will nose directly upward, making it difficult to control. For people with diabetes, controlling blood sugar levels (or blood glucose levels) is kind of like piloting that plane. To stay in the air and have the most fun, you have to keep blood sugar levels steady. Having a blood sugar level that's too high can make you feel lousy, and having it often can be unhealthy. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. Hyperglycemia (pronounced: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels happen when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. Having too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time can cause serious health problems if it's not treated. Hyperglycemia can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, these health problems can occur in adulthood in some Continue reading >>

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

What You Can Do To Stop The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster

If you find that your blood sugars often fluctuate from too high to too low (and vice versa), you’re on the blood sugar rollercoaster. To learn how to eliminate the extremes, you’ll have to do a little sleuthing on your own. Get out your blood glucose meter, and for a week try testing before and after a variety of meals, activities, and destressors to figure out what’s making it go up and down to stop it for good! Your blood sugars are affected by a large number of things, including what you ate (especially refined “white” carbohydrates), how long ago you ate, your starting blood glucose level, physical activity, mental stress, illness, sleep patterns, and more. If you take insulin and use it to treat highs, you can easily end up overcompensating and developing low blood sugars. If you develop a low, it’s easy to overeat and end up high again. Large fluctuations in blood sugars may make you feel cruddy and are bad for your long-term health, so it’s time to learn how to stop the rollercoaster! Physical Activity Effects: During this week, your goal is to do at least 30 minutes of physical activity on three days at varying times of day, and check and record your blood glucose levels before and after the activity. Physical Activity Trial #1: For this first activity, pick one that you normally do (like walking or cycling) and try to do it at your usual time of day. Check and record your blood sugar immediately before starting and within an hour of completing the 30 minutes of activity. You will find that your body responds differently to varying types of physical activities, particularly when the time of day varies as well. If you exercise first thing in the morning (before breakfast and medications), it is not unusual to experience a modest increase in blood s Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 100 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve heard people complain about having low blood sugar before and may have even experienced it yourself. But high blood sugar is also an issue that can a) make you feel like crap and b) cause serious health issues if it happens too often. First, a primer: High blood sugar occurs when the level of glucose (i.e. sugar) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from food, and most foods we eat impact our blood sugar in one way or another, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. “However, foods that are higher in carbohydrates and sugar, yet lower in fat and fiber, such as baked goods, white-flour breads, soda, and candy usually have a bigger impact on blood sugar levels,” she says. In the short-term, they cause sudden rises in blood sugar (i.e. high blood sugar), which can immediately give you a jolt of energy but will inevitably be followed up by a crash. These foods are also usually not great for you, Moskovitz points out, and can cause excess weight gain, high cholesterol, and bodily inflammation. Having high blood sugar here and there happens, and it will basically just make you feel off. You’ll feel worn-out, headachy, all-around tired, cranky, and may have difficulty concentrating, Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. But the major problem lies in having chronically high blood sugar, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, a condition in which your body can’t properly regulate blood sugar. If you get chronic high blood sugar, you’ll also often experience the need to pee frequently, increased thirst, and even have blurred vision, Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. But if you’re not suffering from chronic high blood su Continue reading >>

5 Red Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Know.

5 Red Signs Of High Blood Sugar You Should Know.

Do You Have Signs of High Blood Sugar? Research results from the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention, indicate that almost a third of people who have diabetes, do not know that they have it! You could be one of those who already have diabetes, or you could be someone who is pre-diabetic, a condition that raises your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Here are 5 signs of high blood sugar you should know. Your pancreas produces insulin which controls the level of blood sugar in your body. In Type 2 diabetes, your cells are resistant to insulin, which leaves much of sugar, unable to be absorbed by the cells, in your bloodstream, which impacts negatively on the pancreas, and over-works the kidneys, which then deposit large amounts of sugar-filled liquid into the bladder, leading to frequent urinating. It is almost like being dehydrated, and you are constantly thirsty, seemingly unable to get enough to drink. Is this you? If you are always thirsty, check the list below for more red flags of high blood sugar. Red Flag #1 High blood pressure. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a true red flag for pre-diabetes and insulin resistance by the cells. High BP has no symptoms, so unless you have it tested, you will not be aware that you have it. Having high BP does not necessarily mean that you have diabetes, but it is a good sign that you could be pre-diabetic, and have a high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. When you go for a BP test, ask the doctor to check your sugar as well. What helps: Alpha Lipoic Acid supports optimal blood pressure by making the blood vessels easier to stretch and expand, thus increasing blood flow. Remember prolonged high blood sugar makes the blood cells stickier and causes your heart to work much harder to get the blood through your bod Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is one of the most life-threatening complications of diabetes. The main symptom is unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can be the result of having a blood glucose level that is too high (hyperglycemia) or a blood glucose level that is too low (hypoglycemia). The diabetic in a diabetic coma is unconscious and can die if the condition is not treated. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Before you lapse into a diabetic coma, there are usually warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too low or blood sugar levels that are too high. For example, if the blood sugar is too high, the you may experience tiredness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, increased thirst, a rapid heart rate, a dry mouth, and a fruity smell to your breath. If the blood sugar is too low, you may experience signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, including weakness, tiredness, anxiety, tremulousness, nervousness, nausea, confusion, problems communicating, light-headedness, hunger, or dizziness. If you have had diabetes for many years, you may not have many symptoms of low blood sugar and won’t know you have the condition prior to falling into a coma. If you suspect that you have either high blood sugar or low blood sugar, you need to check your blood glucose levels and do what your doctor has recommended for you to treat the disease. If you don’t feel better after trying home remedies, you need to call 911 and get some kind of emergency care. Causes of Diabetic Coma The main cause of a diabetic coma is an extremely high blood sugar or an extremely low blood sugar. The following medical conditions can cause a diabetic coma: Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. This is a condition in which the blood sugar is as high as 600 mg/d: or 33.3 mmol per liter. There are no ketones in the u Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, occurs when the body has too much food or glucose, or too little insulin. Potential reasons a person with type 1 diabetes (T1D) might have high blood sugar include: Not enough insulin taken Eating more than usual Eating earlier than usual Eating food with higher glucose content without injecting extra insulin Injecting insulin at a site on the body where the absorption rate is slower Missing or skipping an insulin dose A clog in insulin pump tubing Less exercise than normal Emotional or physical stress Illness or injury Other hormones Medications (such as steroids) Pain Hyperglycemia Symptoms Thirst (dehydration) Frequent urination, including potential waking up in the middle of the night to urinate; and unusually wet diapers in an infant or toddler. Blurry vision Stomach pain Increased hunger Nausea Drowsiness, lethargy, exhaustion Confusion Sweating Fruity, sweet or wine-like odor on breath Vomiting Inability to concentrate Weight loss (a longer-term symptom) that eventually leads to coma Treatments The following recommendations are general treatments for high blood sugar. Specific actions, such as giving additional insulin, should be determined by the adult with T1D, physician or parents (for a child). If blood test results are slightly above normal: Continue regular activity Drink water or sugar-free drinks Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Consider injecting additional insulin as instructed by physician or parent If blood test results are moderately high: Don’t engage in strenuous exercise Drink water or sugar-free drinks Inject additional insulin if instructed by physician or parents Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Try to discover Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

7 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

7 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Here’s a scary stat: More than 15 million men in the U.S. have diabetes—a condition that occurs when your blood sugar is too high—but around a quarter of them don’t even know it, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s bad news. When left unchecked, the condition can lead to serious complications like heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage, and vision loss. One of the reasons why so many people end up going untreated is because the symptoms caused by high blood sugar are sneaky. They tend to develop gradually, so you might not realize that you’re sick, says Joel Fuhrman, M.D., author of The End of Diabetes. And even when you notice something is off, the signs can be vague, so you might not make the connection to diabetes. That’s why it’s important to know what to watch for. Here are 7 unexpected signs that your blood sugar levels might be too high. How many do you have? Increased urination is telltale sign that your blood sugar could be out of control. When you have too much glucose—or sugar—in your bloodstream, your kidneys try to flush out the extra through your urine, explains Dr. Fuhrman. As a result, you end up having to pee more often than usual, including in the middle of the night. Since you’re losing so much fluid, you’ll probably feel extra thirsty and your mouth will be dry, too, he says. (For more health news delivered right to your inbox, sign up for our Daily Dose newsletter.) Related: Eat Less Of This So You Won't Have to Wake Up At Night to Pee Peeing more often means that your body is getting rid of more water than usual, which puts you at risk for dehydration, says Dr. Furhman. That can leave you feeling thirsty and cotton-mouthed, even if it seems like you’re drinking the same a Continue reading >>

9 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

9 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

There are many symptoms that tell us that something isn’t quite right with our bodies. In order to know what happens at that moment, we should know to recognize what a specific symptom means, as every of them underlines one or more problems. 1 Normal Blood Sugar Range Your Search For Normal Blood Sugar Range Ends Here. See It! JeevesKnows.com 2 5 Worst Arthritis Foods Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net The sugar in the blood exists in form of glucose and is of great importance for providing the energy to the body’s cells and organs, but it should be at a proper level. The responsibility of keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy range belongs to the hormone known as an insulin, which takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body’s cells. The people who suffer from the type 1 diabetes, have a problem with their immune system as it attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, while those suffering from type 2 diabetes, are not able to use it properly, even it is produced in high amount. What is the Reason for High Blood Sugar? When the people are stressed out or sick, their body produces hormones to combat illness and stress, which most of the times can end up triggering high blood sugar. However, there are other causes of high blood sugar, such as: Eating or drinking more carbohydrates than usual Not enough insulin or oral diabetes medication Illness or infection Less activity or exercise than usual Certain medications Injury or surgery Symptoms of High Blood Sugar If the body’s blood sugar levels increase rapidly, they create health problems. This condition, over time, damages the blood vessels, which can lead to many complications, and even can end up causing a stroke or heart attack, kidney failur Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is having too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. This can happen for many reasons, such as: missing a dose of your usual medication being less active than usual eating too many carbohydrates, found in sugary foods and drinks, and other foods such as potatoes, bread and pasta being sick or taking medication being stressed having an infections (e.g. thrush, cystitis, wound infections) drinking too much alcohol. If you have hyperglycaemia, you might: feel thirsty feel tired have a dry mouth need to pass urine frequently have a headache feel confused feel drowsy. It’s important that if you feel like this, you act on it. If not treated, a high blood sugar level can lead to a serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Here are some steps you can take if you find your blood sugar level is higher than it should be. Get plenty of rest. Contact your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator for advice about increasing your dose of short acting insulin. You may also need extra doses of this insulin (e.g. 2-4 units every 2 hours ). Check your urine for ketones if you have the necessary equipment. Always test using urine that you have just freshly passed, otherwise you may not get a true reading. Drink plenty of sugar-free, non-alcoholic fluids such as water to stay well hydrated. Try to avoid alcohol and drinks containing caffeine, such as cola, tea and coffee, as these can dehydrate you. Check your blood sugar level regularly to see if it is going down. Contact your doctor or go to hospital if: vomiting is stopping you from drinking or eating your blood glucose levels remain high you find moderate to high levels of ketones in your urine. Continue reading >>

Why Is My A1c High When My Blood Sugar Levels Are In My Target Range?

Why Is My A1c High When My Blood Sugar Levels Are In My Target Range?

Results of an A1C test and a blood glucose check don't always match up. The A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels over a 120-day period (the lifespan of a red blood cell). But a blood glucose check measures your blood sugar at a single moment. If your blood sugar levels were high last week, and you adjusted your diabetes treatment plan so that your blood sugar returned to normal, the A1C result may still be high, because it includes the high blood sugar levels from the previous week. The A1C test measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Glycated hemoglobin is created when molecules of hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in your blood) attach to molecules of glucose (the sugar in your blood). The more sugar you have in your blood, the higher your percentage of glycated hemoglobin. I want you to picture a freshly fried doughnut hole, just out of the deep fryer. Steam wafts from its surface. Still gleaming wet with oil, it’s sent spinning across a tray of powdered sugar. As it tumbles, sugar sticks to the wet oil, coating it, covering it as it rolls and bounces along. Well, the same thing happens to your red blood cells. As they tumble and spin and roll through your blood vessels, sugar molecules stick to their skins. Or another way to think of it is to picture a windshield of a truck after driving through a swarm of mosquitoes. Splat-Splat-Splat-Splat-Splat! (OK, I just threw that in so you wouldn’t log off and drive straight to Dunkin Doughnuts.) So an A1C test is a measure of how much of the skins of your red blood cells are splattered with sugar, which in turn gives as a picture of the blood sugar environment in which the cells lived, which in turn gives us a notion of your average blood sugar over the last several months. So th Continue reading >>

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