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How Does Exercise Affect The Level Of Blood Sugar?

The Connection Between Exercise And Blood Sugar Levels

The Connection Between Exercise And Blood Sugar Levels

Experts agree the best way to effectively manage your diabetes is a combination of good lifestyle choices—notably, diet and exercise. By exercise, they mean a blend of aerobic activity, strength-building exercise and flexibility training. And in fact, a combination of strength-training and aerobic exercise seems to be more effective for keeping your blood sugar levels under control than either type of activity by itself. However, you can’t just lace up your sneakers and start pounding the pavement or hoisting the dumbbells. You have to prepare for the effect that exercise has on your blood glucose levels—namely, it tends to lower your blood glucose levels. The specific amount will depend on how long you’re active. Follow these steps to stay on top of your blood sugar levels while you’re getting your sweat on: Talk to your doctor and health care team. Before you do anything, check with your doctor and get screened for any underlying complications or anything that might predispose you to certain types of injuries, like severe peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy. They can help you develop a plan and set a target range for your blood glucose levels, too. Eat before exercising. Break the fast! Don’t put off eating so you can exercise first. Eating a couple of hours prior to a workout can help you keep your blood sugar level at a normal level. Test your blood sugar levels. It’s crucial to have a good handle on your specific blood glucose levels before, during and after you exercise. So, before you work out, test to make sure your blood glucose is less than 250 mg/dl, as the 100-250 mg/dl is generally considered a safe zone. If your blood glucose exceeds the 250 mg/dl mark, test your urine for ketones. If ketones are present, it’s best to postpone your workou Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

Timing Exercise For Maximum Blood Glucose Control

Timing Exercise For Maximum Blood Glucose Control

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association indicates that engaging in moderate physical activity after an evening meal is more effective at controlling postprandial (after-meal) blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes than engaging in the same activity before the meal. The researchers, out of Old Dominion University, looked at six men and six women with Type 2 diabetes and an average age of roughly 60. Each was being treated with either diet alone or with a combination of diet and oral medicines. The study involved serving the participants a standardized dinner on each of three days. On separate days over the course of the trial period, the after-meal blood glucose effects of no exercise, 20 minutes of self-paced walking on a treadmill immediately before the meal, and 20 minutes of the same activity 15–20 minutes after the meal were evaluated in each person. Blood glucose patterns were determined by blood samples drawn at 30-minute intervals for a 4-hour period before and after the dinner and physical activity. The data showed that walking after the meals stabilized blood glucose levels and resulted in less of a postmeal blood glucose rise than walking prior to dinner. The investigators note that engaging in physical activity at any time of day is likely to improve overall blood glucose control. As this research demonstrates, however, the short-term effect of exercise on blood glucose levels may depend on the timing of the exercise. Based on the findings, the study’s authors advise older people with diabetes “to undertake aerobic exercise after meals, including the evening one, to… reduce the likelihood of negative health consequences associated with postprandial glucose excursions.” For more information Continue reading >>

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

Exercise For Diabetes Control

Exercise For Diabetes Control

By the dLife Editors In case you haven’t heard: Exercise is really good for people with type 2 diabetes. It helps control blood sugar levels, increases energy levels, improves heart health, and promotes emotional well-being. Barring other medical complications, the majority of people with diabetes can and should exercise for diabetes control and for better overall health and well-being. How does exercise lower blood sugar? Exercise lowers blood sugar in two ways: First, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. This means that your cells are better able to use available insulin to absorb sugar from the bloodstream to be used as energy for your body. Second, exercise stimulates another mechanism that allows your muscles to absorb and use sugar for energy, even without insulin. Not only does exercise lower blood sugar levels in the short term, but exercising over time also contributes to lower A1C levels over time. How important is exercise? Leading a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and the high incidence of obesity and overweight among people with type 2 is also highly correlated with inactivity. Starting a workout program can lower body mass and consequently decrease the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who exercise regularly have better A1c profiles than those who don’t. Along with medical nutrition therapy, exercise is one of the first lines of defense in type 2 diabetes control. In addition, exercise is a key tool in preventing one of the leading complications of type 2 diabetes—cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that regular activity lowers triglyceride levels and blood pressure. How much exercise do you need? The American Diabetes Continue reading >>

Exercise And Blood Glucose Levels

Exercise And Blood Glucose Levels

Exercise is good for you. It’s good for the heart, good for losing weight, makes you feel better (really — it releases endorphins that elevate mood), and it’s good for blood glucose — well, sort of. It is good for blood glucose, but it can be tricky at the same time. So today I’m going to talk about how to deal with blood sugar when you’re exercising so that you can minimize the negative effects and enjoy the positive. OK, let’s start with some basics. Aerobic exercise, or cardio, is what we call activity that requires “the pumping of oxygenated blood by the heart,” to be delivered to working muscles. A general rule of thumb is that aerobic exercise is achieved when our heart rate and breathing rate rise in a sustainable way (in order to maintain this pumping of oxygenated blood — the heart rate to circulate the blood, the breathing rate to increase the oxygen intake). Anaerobic exercise occurs when the activity is simply too much for the heart rate and breathing to keep up with, causing you to become out of breath, and it includes activities such as sprinting and weightlifting. Here, we’ll be talking about aerobic activities, such as swimming, running, or dancing. So, what happens with aerobic activity? First, it lowers blood glucose. Why? Because the muscles are working harder and they need energy. The glucose in our blood is energy for our cells. Insulin is the hormone that transfers the glucose from our blood to our cells. So when we Diabetians exercise, we often “go low.” This is because the glucose in our blood is quickly moved into our cells, but the insulin in our blood is still active. Unlike non-Diabetians, the insulin we’ve injected doesn’t go away once the glucose has been moved. It keeps moving glucose out of the blood (and out Continue reading >>

Exercise, Blood Glucose, And Insulin

Exercise, Blood Glucose, And Insulin

Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, also known as type 1 diabetes, causes severe neurological and cardiovascular disorders. Insulin plays a crucial role in maintaining glucose levels within the circulatory system. Glucose levels that are unregulated in the DM 1 patient may lead to possible life threatening situations. These situations can be either acute, such as diabetic (hyperglycemic) coma; or chronic, such as distal neuropathy and atherosclerosis. The proper education of exercise, nutrition, and monitoring of blood glucose levels is crucial. Physical therapists should necessitate this education for our patients that their acts are imperative to a healthy life. Diabetes is a condition that can be managed to an extent. Management will reduce the health care costs and promote longevity to our patient’s lives. The role of our profession in patient education is important. Exercise and nutrition has shown to reduce the amounts of insulin required for our bodies.1 As physical therapists, we must promote the benefits of exercise and nutrition to diabetes patients. The relationship between exercise, blood glucose, and insulin will be broken down into the following categories: exercise and it’s effects on blood glucose, exercise and it’s effects on insulin, and insulin and it’s effects on blood glucose. These categories will demonstrate the effects of pharmacologic interventions and non-pharmacologic interventions on diabetes. The best possible solution for control of blood glucose levels will be explored. This will demonstrate the importance of insulin injections vs. nutrition/exercise and their effects on blood glucose levels. The final section of this mini-paper will discuss the appropriate regime to be used for a patient with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus ( Continue reading >>

How Exercise Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

How Exercise Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

You’ve probably heard your doctor say that exercise is one of the best things you can do to manage your blood sugar levels as well as improve your diabetes symptoms. And your doctor is right! How Exercise Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels Time and time again, you’ve probably heard your doctor say that exercise is one of the best things you can do to manage your blood sugar levels as well as improve your diabetes symptoms. And your doctor is right! According to the American Diabetes Association, just 30 minutes of moderate activity a day (think: brisk walking, jogging, dancing, or playing a sport) can lower your blood glucose and A1C, increase your energy, and boost your mood. But did you know there are a few extra risks that come from exercising with diabetes? Here are four facts you should know about how exercise affects your blood sugar levels, along with four more things to keep in mind before you start getting active. 1. Exercise can lower your blood sugar—sometimes a little too much. Being physically active increases your insulin sensitivity. This means your cells are working extra hard and need as much fuel, or glucose, as possible. If your body doesn’t have enough sugar in it before you start exercising, you might experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing hypoglycemia during exercise, but it can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes. 2. Carbohydrates can help balance your blood sugar levels before and after exercise. If your blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dl before your workout, it’s a good idea to have a small pre-exercise snack. Foods full of carbohydrates, like a juice box or glucose tablets, will help raise your blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

Manage Glucose, Lose Weight, and Reduce Complications If your doctor has diagnosed you with Type 2 diabetes, then she has probably already told you about the importance of adding exercise to your treatment plan. Physical activity can help you improve your blood sugar control, lose weight, and reduce your risk of heart disease, peripheral artery disease and nerve problems that are often associated with diabetes. In many cases, the right combination of diet and exercise can even help eliminate the need for medication for people with Type 2 diabetes. But before you get started, you need to understand how exercise influences blood glucose regulation, and how to avoid potential problems, minimize risks, and recognize when you may need to get additional information or support from your health care provider. *The general information in this article is not a substitute for talking to your health care provider before you begin an exercise program, or if you experience any problems in connection with your exercise. How Exercise Benefits People with Type 2 Diabetes In addition to boosting your energy levels, mood, and capacity to burn calories for weight loss, regular exercise can lead to the following benefits: Improved blood sugar control by enhancing insulin sensitivity. Exercising on a regular basis makes muscles use insulin better. When muscles are able to use insulin better, they are able to pull more glucose from the bloodstream to use for energy. The more vigorously you exercise, the more glucose you’ll use, and the longer the positive effects on your blood glucose levels will last. Increased insulin sensitivity. Type-2 diabetics who exercise regularly need less insulin to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells that need it. Reduced need for medication. Com Continue reading >>

How Does Exercise Affect Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics?

How Does Exercise Affect Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics?

Type 2 Diabetes is too much insulin in the blood. Most MD’s call it “Insulin Resistance”, which is ignorance. Lot of that going around. It usually is the result of inactive muscles and too many carbs. When we consume carbohydrates, they turn into glucose, the only fuel of our cells. Insulin is a highly reactive molecule that gets released into the blood by the pancreas once the brain gets the message that more glucose is in the blood. Cells cannot take up the glucose unless there is an electron exchange with Insulin that opens the glucose receptors. If the cells are full, like gasoline tanks in our cars, there is no way to take in the glucose, BUT the insulin continues to circulate until it is neutralized by irritating the arteries and other organs. Arterial irritations lead to arteriosclerosis. It is true, heart disease follows Type 2 D. The numbers you quote don’t seem right. Are you testing your blood several times a day? The high impact exercise number-result makes sense and supports my explanation, above. You are burning the glucose, and it is why the number drops to 80; soon you should start feeling hungry. You are doing the right thing, but if you are overweight, you might see illogical numbers for a while. Lose 10 pounds, like I did on my dentist’s advice, and the Type 2 will probably go away, with exercise, especially. Continue reading >>

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Part 1 of 8 What is blood sugar? Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, comes from the food you eat. Your body creates blood sugar by digesting some food into a sugar that circulates in your bloodstream. Blood sugar is used for energy. The sugar that isn’t needed to fuel your body right away gets stored in cells for later use. Too much sugar in your blood can be harmful. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that is characterized by having higher levels of blood sugar than what is considered within normal limits. Unmanaged diabetes can lead to problems with your heart, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. The more you know about how eating affects blood sugar, the better you can protect yourself against diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it’s important to know how eating affects blood sugar. Part 2 of 8 Your body breaks down everything you eat and absorbs the food in its different parts. These parts include: carbohydrates proteins fats vitamins and other nutrients The carbohydrates you consume turn into blood sugar. The more carbohydrates you eat, the higher the levels of sugar you will have released as you digest and absorb your food. Carbohydrates in liquid form consumed by themselves are absorbed more quickly than those in solid food. So having a soda will cause a faster rise in your blood sugar levels than eating a slice of pizza. Fiber is one component of carbohydrates that isn’t converted into sugar. This is because it can’t be digested. Fiber is important for health, though. Protein, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals don’t contain carbohydrates. These components won’t affect your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, your carbohydrate intake is the most important part of your diet to consider when it comes to managing your blood sugar levels. Part 3 Continue reading >>

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

How Exercise Lowers Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

If you stick with it, exercise can reduce your need for blood-sugar-lowering drugs.(ISTOCKPHOTO) You may consider exercise a nuisance, a chore, or simply a bore. But if you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you need to look at physical activity in a whole new light. Now it's a tool. Just like taking a drug or altering your diet, exercise can lower blood sugar on its own, even if you don't lose weight. "Exercising is the most underused treatment and it's so, so powerful," said Sharon Movsas, RD, a diabetes nutrition specialist at the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. For most people with diabetes, exercise is a safe and highly recommended way to reduce the risk of complications. However, check with your doctor to make sure you don't have heart problems, nerve damage, or other issues that need special consideration when you are working out. How exercise affects blood sugar In general, blood sugar drops after exercise and is lower for the next 24 to 48 hours, says Movsas. "If I take a blood sugar reading after aqua-aerobics, I usually notice it's down," says David Mair, 79, of Marquette, Mich. When you exercise, your muscles become more sensitive to insulin and absorb more glucose from the blood. However, like many aspects of type 2 diabetes, the response can be highly personal. Exercise can sometimes boost blood sugar. At first, you'll need to test your blood sugar before, after, and sometimes during exercise, to see how your body responds). Exercise also helps lower blood pressurean important benefit since high blood pressure can contribute to heart attacks, strokes, eye problems, kidney failure, and other type 2 diabetes complications. Next Page: Start slow [ pagebreak ]Start slow and work up Even if you know exercise is good Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may discourage some with T1DM from exercising. Children and youth may be embarrassed by the temporary reduction in coordination and physical performance associated with hypoglycemia and by the fear of letting teammates down while playing. Some parents may discourage their children from normal participation in physical activity and from playing competitive sports because of concern about severe hypoglycemia. However, this fear may reduce a child’s physical activity, which may lead to reduced overall health, reduced enjoyment from exercise, and restricted confidence in meeting the demands imposed by living with a chronic health condition like diabetes. As a result, long-term exercise habits as well as personal growth and psycho-social development may be blunted. Concern with hypoglycemia from exercise is probably even more heightened in those with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of symptoms during hypoglycemia. However, some of these concerns might be allayed by the realization that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugars rather than lower it. The fact that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugar appears to be relatively unknown to many with T1DM. However, the effect has been confirmed in a number of studies. These studies have identified an exercise threshold that elicits this response. The threshold exercise intensity occurs at or above 80% of a person’s maximum exercis Continue reading >>

Prediabetic? Try Exercise To Control Your Blood Sugar Levels

Prediabetic? Try Exercise To Control Your Blood Sugar Levels

By pH health care professionals Staying fit into middle age may be one way to reduce your risk of prediabetes and diabetes, according to a new study published in Diabetologia online. Prediabetes simply means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but is not yet diabetes. It is estimated that half of all U.S. adults have either prediabetes or diabetes. So if you need another reason to lace up those sneakers, how about preventing diabetes? In this recent study, researchers hypothesized that the more fit you are, the less likely you’d be to develop prediabetes or diabetes by middle age. And, after studying 4,373 black and white adults in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study over 20 years, turns out they were right. For those who maintained or increased their physical fitness from young adulthood into middle age, their efforts paid off. The participants were recruited in the 1980s when they were ages 18 to 30 years old. The researchers were able to see how fit they were based how long they could run on a treadmill. They repeated this test again in year seven of the study when the participants were 25 to 37 years old, and then again in year 20, when they were 38 to 50 years old. They checked for prediabetes and diabetes at the beginning of the study and at years seven, 10, 15, 20 and 25. By year 25, they found 44.5 percent of the participants had developed prediabetes, and 11.5 percent had developed Type 2 diabetes. Participants who developed prediabetes or diabetes were more likely to be older, black males, and they were more likely to: be on blood-pressure medication, smoke and have a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) score (a calculation doctors use to assess weight relative to your height). After several decades of study, researchers conclude Continue reading >>

Why Some Types Of Exercise Can Make Your Blood Sugar Increase

Why Some Types Of Exercise Can Make Your Blood Sugar Increase

Have you ever wondered why your blood sugar falls during certain types of exercise whilst roaring to sky-high levels during and after other types of exercise? If you’re curious about the scientific explanation of the relationship between exercise and blood sugar, read on. I rarely come across scientific studies that explore how exercise affects blood sugar in people living with Type 1 diabetes, so when I recently got my hands on just such a research paper, I dug in with great interest (they specified Type 1 diabetes, but I would think that the results are applicable to anybody using insulin). Well actually, Google and I dug in. This research paper is heavy reading. You know those scientific papers where you feel like you need an advanced degree (plus a whole lot of Googling) just to understand the introduction? This is one of them. The paper is titled “Effect of intermittent high-intensity compared with continuous moderate exercise on glucose production and utilization in individuals with type 1 diabetes”, and is written by a team of scientists from Australia. It was published in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2007 (not exactly new research, but peer reviewed research nonetheless, which means it’s legit). Anyway, I thought that the subject was relevant and interesting enough to spend the time reading and understanding it. So, since I’ve done the heavy reading, let me share what I’ve learned with you. Exercise and blood sugar impact So why do some types of exercise make our blood sugar drop like crazy while others hardly have any impact? I know from my own experience that I really have to watch my blood sugars if I do steady state cardio, while an interval training session will have little impact or even make my blood s Continue reading >>

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