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How Does Blood Sugar Affect The Liver

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Fatty Liver Is More Dangerous Than You Might Realize. Here’s How To Heal It

“My doctor says I have a fatty liver and I should stay away from fat,” writes this week’s house call. “Are high-fat foods the culprit here? Any tips to help with a fatty liver?” Indeed, your doctor is right to feel concern: Fatty liver is a dangerous yet misunderstood disease. In America, it affects 90 million of us and 17 percent of our children. Think about foie gras, the French delicacy made from duck or goose liver. It is made by force-feeding the animals a combination of sugar with corn and starch (a really sad, horrible practice), intentionally creating a fatty liver. So if you’re gorging on sugar and starch, you’re essentially doing the same thing with your own liver. Fatty liver literally means your liver fills with fat, paving the path for chronic disease and inflammation. You might be surprised to learn the primary culprit here. Research shows that carbs (and not fat) produce more fat in your belly and liver. Sugar switches on fat production in your liver, creating an internal process called lipogenesis, which is your body’s normal response to sugar. Fructose, the most detrimental sugar that heads directly to your liver, actually ramps up lipogenesis. That Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. User25259

    Liver Dump: In a Nutshell!

    I've read bits and pieces about this liver dump theory/condition, and would like someone, anyone to give me a short synopsis, or snapshot of just what exactly a "Liver dump" is; how to prevent it one from happening; and the pros and cons of a liver dump!
    Thanks for the info, it will be nice to have a short and sweet answer to what it is and how to know if it happens.
    Pastor Paul

  2. Nan OH

    Liver Dump is when your body thinks it is in need of fuel - glucose that is stored in the liver is released to fuel you up. Pros - not a thing a diabetic wants. Cons - high BGL in the morning. I can modify my glucose release by eating a small bowl of cereal with real sugar as a bed time snack (I use insulin). Don't think it can be prevented at all.
    This is not a part of our normal attempt to get control - it usually happens while we sleep because that is the longest time we go without eating. Clear as Mud? Sorry

  3. smorgan

    Liver dumps are insulin the result of resistance of the liver. At various times as others have described - most notably at dawn - signals are sent out for the liver to release glycogen from its stores as glucose. In a normal system, the first release of glucose triggers a release of insulin from the pancreas. Shepherding glucose into cells for energy is not insulin's only job. It also 1) pushes fat into storage and inhibits its release and 2) encourages storage of glucose as glycogen in the liver AND inhibits or stops its release.
    So, in a type 2, normal hormone signals which would only cause a slight (and beneficial) rise in blood sugar cause a higher spike. This is because the liver responded to those other hormones but its response to insulin is impaired - hepatic insulin resistance - and so it releases more than it should, i.e., doesn't know when to stop.
    I avoid this by keeping my glycogen stores depleted. Depleting them is a prerequisite for getting into ketosis and since I stay in ketosis virtually all the time, no liver dumps. If I come out of ketosis - even though still eating very much "low-carb" and with good numbers throughout the day, Dawn Phenomenon will return and if breakfast is delayed, my BG will drift slowly up instead of its normal down or steady state.
    Others have various other tricks for getting around the broken hormone signaling/response.

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