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How Does Blood Sugar Affect Hormones

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Just for women, but men can learn from this too ! Pregnant? If you’ve been wondering if pregnancy hormones will affect blood sugar levels, the answer is yes, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The placenta is a flat, circular organ that links the unborn baby to the mother’s uterus during pregnancy. It produces several contrainsulin hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, prolacin and human placental lactogen. The production of these hormones, along with increased levels of cortisol, can affect your body’s sensitivity to insulin, whether it is produced by your body, injection or pump. Although these hormones are essential to a healthy pregnancy, this hormonal “aggravation,” along with weight gain as your pregnancy progresses, can contribute to a rise in blood glucose levels, especially after the 18th week, says the ADA. The best way to ensure your glucose levels are under control is to know where they’re at all times. The ADA recommends frequent self-glucose monitoring (up to eight times a day when you are pregnant) to help identify changes in blood glucose levels. This will help you and your diabetes health team make necessary changes for the best blood glucose control throughout your pregnancy. Reprinted from 101 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Laura B. Heironymus. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Continue reading >>

Insulin | You And Your Hormones From The Society For Endocrinology

Insulin | You And Your Hormones From The Society For Endocrinology

A person with diabetes being injected with insulin to regulate their blood sugar levels. Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas . There are specialised areas within the pancreas called islets of Langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula that means island). The islets of Langerhans are made up of different type of cells that make hormones, the commonest ones are the beta cells, which produce insulin. Insulin is then released from the pancreas into the bloodstream so that it can reach different parts of the body. Insulin has many effects but mainly it controls how the body uses carbohydrates found in certain types of food. Carbohydrates are broken down by the human body to produce a type of sugar called glucose . Glucose is the main energy source used by cells. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat ( adipose tissue ) to take up this glucose and use it as a source of energy so they can function properly. Without insulin, cells are unable to use glucose as fuel and they will start malfunctioning. Extra glucose that is not used by the cells will be converted and stored as fat so it can be used to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). The main actions that insulin has are to allow glucose to enter cells to be used as energy and to maintain the amount of glucose found in the bloodstream within normal levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. This is a complex process and other hormones found in the gut and pancreas also contribute to this blood glucose regulation. When we eat food, glucose Continue reading >>

Testing Blood Sugar Level

Testing Blood Sugar Level

Ages 11+ students can test the glucose level of various blood samples and determine whether or not the person has eaten. They will then correct the blood sugar level by treating with different regulatory hormones. How do hormones regulate blood sugar levels? Blood glucose testing is an activity designed to increase understanding of the hormones that control blood sugar in the body, and why this control is important in staying healthy. This activity is designed for students aged 11-14 and involves practical science techniques such as pipetting. Students can gain a practical understanding of the hormones that are secreted in the body when blood sugar levels are too high or too low. To introduce insulin and glucagon as hormones that help control blood sugar levels To give students the chance to develop practical science skills using pipettes and test tubes blood glucose levels need to be kept in a very narrow safe range for our bodies to function correctly the hormones glucagon and insulin regulate blood sugar levels Glucagon is produced by the pancreas and stimulates glucose to be released from glycogen in the liver Insulin is produced by the pancreas and allows cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream Diabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are not regulated properly. Type-1 diabetes is when you no longer produce insulin and your blood glucose level can become dangerously high unless you are given insulin regularly by injection. Type-2 diabetes is when you dont produce enough insulin or no longer respond to the insulin you do produce. Type-1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and tends to be diagnosed in children. Type-2 diabetes tends to affect older people or those who are over-weight. Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

Your Blood Sugar May Be The Key To Your Hormone Imbalance

Your Blood Sugar May Be The Key To Your Hormone Imbalance

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy I remember frommy early medical training that the first question a doctor should ask a patient with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is, Are you trying to get pregnant? If the answer is no, hand them the birth control pill . If the answer is yes, choose between clomid, a fertility drug, and metformin, an insulin sensitizer. No questions related to lifestyle, stress, nutrition, total toxic burden I had29 more patients to get to that day. It turns out that research showsmany lifestyle changescan pull someone out of the metabolic chaos of PCOS, anddecrease herchances of developing co-morbidities such as diabetes , heart disease , hypertension , sleep apnea , anxiety , depression and infertility . RELATED: What You Should Know About Infertilitys Most Common Cause Insulin resistance is one of the root physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS. This is where your pancreas needs to pump out more and more insulin in response to high blood sugar levels. Insulin lowers the blood sugar by storing the glucose in cells. The cells become resistant to the constant insulin and need more to be signaled to lower the blood sugar. When this resistance goes on for a while, you have high insulin and high blood sugar. Incidentally, insulin is a fat-storage hormone, concentrating fat in the belly region. High insulin levels can tell the ovaries to make more testosterone. Thats why some women with PCOS have symptoms of excess androgens, like dark hairs on the face and belly. If you have PCOS, ask your doctor for a fasting insulin and fasting glucose level to be drawn, along with a HgbA1C (an average of blood su Continue reading >>

Sex Hormones And Health

Sex Hormones And Health

Over 50% of men with Type 2 diabetes have lower than normal testosterone (T) levels. Men with Type 1 also tend to have low T levels. Now research shows that women with diabetes often have low levels of estrogen (E), and that raising E protects against kidney and heart disease in this population. This sex hormone/diabetes connection may be very deep. In our current column on sex and diabetes, my partner and I reported on how raising T levels can help with insulin resistance (IR), lower cholesterol, and improve glucose control. Then I found some research from Georgetown researchers Shannon Sullivan, MD, and Christine Maric, PhD. They report that, among people without diabetes, men have much more kidney disease than women. But in people with diabetes, women and men have a more similar rate of kidney disease. Estrogens and Diabetes Women with diabetes tend to have too little estrogen and/or too much testosterone (a “low E:T ratio”). Sullivan and Maric say this lack of estrogen is associated with increased kidney disease and worse outcomes. Sullivan and Maric report on data showing that postmenopausal women with Type 2 improved their glucose control with hormone replacement. Supplementing low-E women with the hormone 17-β-estradiol reduced the incidence of diabetes and protected against diabetic kidney disease. This is similar to reports on testosterone for men. Sullivan and Maric say that, “Diabetic women reach menopause earlier than non-diabetics, suggesting lower baseline E levels.” They also point out that in the rat version of Type 2, females have lower estrogen levels compared to females without diabetes. The value of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women has been questioned recently. But HRT still seems to prevent heart disease in women with diabetes. A Continue reading >>

Hormones And Their Affect On Type 1 Diabetes Management

Hormones And Their Affect On Type 1 Diabetes Management

For people with Type 1 diabetes, there are certain stages in life that can seem a bit more like a rollercoaster than others. In most cases, these ups and downs can be attributed to a shift in hormones. Major hormonal changes can be due to many things, such as puberty, menopause, menstrual cycle, stress and illness, to name a few. Definitive correlations between hormones and blood glucose levels, insulin sensitivities and other possible Type 1 related side effects have been difficult to pinpoint thus far. Until more studies have been published about hormonal effects on T1D, there are things we can keep in mind based on the type of imbalance hormones can generally cause for T1D management. Growth hormones Both men and women experience puberty, and it can occur anywhere between the ages of 9 and 16. One of the primary hormones that kick in during puberty are growth hormones, and it has been noted by medical professionals that this kind of hormone can create insulin resistance. As a result, insulin requirements are often increased significantly during growth spurts. Other things to keep in mind during puberty that can have an effect on T1D: Behavioral changes / Moodiness Body image issues Increase in appetite Peer pressure Changes in sleep habits More (or less) physical activity Menstruation Women often notice changes in their blood sugar levels depending on where they are in their menstrual cycle. Many women have reported having abnormally high blood sugars the week before starting their period, and lower blood sugars in the few days following starting their period. It is important to note, however, that hormones fluctuate differently for each person – especially considering that women use all different kinds of birth control that can contribute to these fluctuations. Me Continue reading >>

An In-depth Look At Blood Sugar And Your Hormones

An In-depth Look At Blood Sugar And Your Hormones

An In-depth look at Blood Sugar and your Hormones Posted on November 21, 2018 by bebalanced - Exercise , Hormone Imbalance , Natural Hormone Balancing , Weight Loss , Wellness Insulin resistance has become a huge problem in our culture and it can lead to myriad of chronic health problems. Since insulin is a hormone, and all hormones communicate with each other, increased insulin levels disrupt every other hormone system in your body. When insulin isnt doing its job, its nearly impossible to reduce the associated symptoms including; weight gain, difficulty losing weight, low energy levels, brain fog, food cravings, sleep issues, hot flashes, and night sweats. Insulin is a hormone produced by yourpancreas, and it plays an important role in metabolism.After you eat, your digestive system breaks down the foods you eat mainly carbohydrates into glucose, or sugar, which is then released into your bloodstream. With the help of the hormoneinsulin, glucose can absorb into the cells of your body to be used for energy or storage. Insulin is also important because it stops sugar from accumulating in your bloodstream. The more you eat, the more insulin your body releases to regulate your blood sugar and keep it within a healthy range. If our bodies are constantly over producing insulin to combat the effects of excess sugars, carbohydrates and stress, our cells stop responding, or become resistant to insulin. When this happens, too much sugar stays in the blood and builds up, instead of being used by our cells, which can lead to major health problems. If you have insulin resistance, your cells will have trouble absorbing this glucose, and your body will require more insulin to function properly. In the United States, an estimated 60 to 70 million individuals are affected by insulin Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Other Hormones

Blood Sugar & Other Hormones

Other hormones also affect blood sugar. Glucagon, amylin, GIP, GLP-1, epinephrine, cortisol, and growth hormone also affect blood sugar levels. Glucagon: Made by islet cells (alpha cells) in the pancreas, controls the production of glucose and another fuel, ketones, in the liver. Glucagon is released overnight and between meals and is important in maintaining the body’s sugar and fuel balance. It signals the liver to break down its starch or glycogen stores and helps to form new glucose units and ketone units from other substances. It also promotes the breakdown of fat in fat cells. In contrast, after a meal, when sugar from the ingested food rushes into your bloodstream, your liver doesn’t need to make sugar. The consequence? Glucagon levels fall. Unfortunately, in individuals with diabetes, the opposite occurs. While eating, their glucagon levels rise, which causes blood sugar levels to rise after the meal. WITH DIABETES, GLUCAGON LEVELS ARE TOO HIGH AT MEALTIMES GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1), GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) and amylin: GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1), GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) and amylin are other hormones that also regulate mealtime insulin. GLP-1 and GIP are incretin hormones. When released from your gut, they signal the beta cells to increase their insulin secretion and, at the same time, decrease the alpha cells’ release of glucagon. GLP-1 also slows down the rate at which food empties from your stomach, and it acts on the brain to make you feel full and satisfied. People with type 1 diabetes have absent or malfunctioning beta cells so the hormones insulin and amylin are missing and the hormone GLP1 cannot work properly. This may explain, in part, why individuals with diabetes do not suppress gl Continue reading >>

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

P regnant? If you’ve been wondering if pregnancy hormones will affect blood sugar levels, the answer is yes, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The placenta is a flat, circular organ that links the unborn baby to the mother’s uterus during pregnancy. It produces several contrainsulin hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, prolacin and human placental lactogen. The production of these hormones, along with increased levels of cortisol, can affect your body’s sensitivity to insulin, whether it is produced by your body, injection or pump. Although these hormones are essential to a healthy pregnancy, this hormonal “aggravation,” along with weight gain as your pregnancy progresses, can contribute to a rise in blood glucose levels, especially after the 18th week, says the ADA. The best way to ensure your glucose levels are under control is to know where they’re at all times. The ADA recommends frequent self-glucose monitoring (up to eight times a day when you are pregnant) to help identify changes in blood glucose levels. This will help you and your diabetes health team make necessary changes for the best blood glucose control throughout your pregnancy. Reprinted from 101 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Laura B. Heironymus. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has just launched a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that will offer diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. You’ll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black R Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

Did you know that if you are going through menopause it could be impacting blood sugar levels? This happened to me three years ago during peri menopause, after a fasting blood sugar bllod test, told borderline type 2 diabetes, so, I have to monitor regularly, no family history of diabetes, and not over weight... all in order now, it was peri causing it... but I was not aware until the blood test. Yes, it's true! Your female hormones, estrogens and progesterone affect your cells' sensitivity to insulin. So if you thought as your menopausal symptoms have gotten worse your blood sugar levels have also become less predictable, you are not crazy, it is true. Why does one of your health conditions affect another? It is happening because our hormones impact There are three different estrogens which are produced mainly in the ovaries each month that we have our menstrual cycle. As we move into menopause the levels of estrogen being produced in the ovaries begin to decline. Once in the blood stream, insulin travels to cells to help remove glucose from the blood so it can enter all of our cells easily. Estrogen has a protective effect on pancreas cells and prevents them from premature cell death. It also works on the cells of the pancreas to increase the production of insulin when required by certain conditions, such as diabetes. The decline in estrogen seems to cause our cells to become more insulin resistant, exacerbating blood glucose levels circulating in the body. Insulin resistance causes cells to not absorb glucose from the bloodstream as readily so blood glucose levels get higher. This causes a higher probability of exacerbating high blood sugars and diabetic complications over time. So what is the solution to this seemingly-complicated situation where menopause and diabe Continue reading >>

How Sugar Causes Hormonal Imbalance + How To Quit Sugar

How Sugar Causes Hormonal Imbalance + How To Quit Sugar

One of the essential components of the FLO Living protocol is management of blood sugar. Not one woman who works with me to resolve her PMS, cramps, low libido, PCOS, or infertility starts out with stabilized blood sugar. You’ve probably heard a lot more lately about how sugar is the source of many health issues. There has been a campaign, backed by the World Health Organization, to tax sugar like tobacco and other dangerous substances. New research has shown the sugar lobby deliberately hid the science from the American public and paid scientists to shift the blame for obesity onto fat. New studies have revealed that sugar is making us fat and making us sick, with a link between sugar consumption and many chronic diseases. All signs are pointing towards the need for us to move on from sugar and get to grips with our consumption, as well as learn how to manage our blood sugar levels. Of course, sugar is not just sugar – it’s white sugar, and brown sugar, white carbs (ie. bread, pasta, potatoes), agave, maple syrup, cane sugar. There are so many ways in which sugar is now packaged, but also so many alternative sweeteners out there, that while marginally better than refined sugar, still have the same negative impact on our blood sugar levels and therefore our overall health. It’s not that I avoid, or expect you to avoid, sweeteners entirely – but we do need to choose the right kind of sweeteners and use them in controlled, small amounts. Sugar and your hormones So, how does this relate back to your hormones? As I said, an essential component of the FLO Living protocol is stabilizing blood sugar and the first step is cutting back on sugar. Our bodies and brains need glucose as fuel – so we do need some sugar, just not as much as you’re probably eating at this Continue reading >>

Insulin, Blood Sugar And Thyroid – Hidden Cause Of Thyroid Problems #1:

Insulin, Blood Sugar And Thyroid – Hidden Cause Of Thyroid Problems #1:

How do insulin and blood sugar levels affect your thyroid? Well let’s quickly review insulin and blood sugar regulation. The reader’s digest version goes like this; eat carbs, then your blood sugar rises which then causes a release of insulin. A reasonable amount of carbs and stimulation of this process is OK and actually good, however most people are consuming far too much carbohydrate which then causes a myriad of problems. You could fill an entire book on this topic alone, but for now lets focus on the thyroid connection. Insulin and blood sugar primarily influence your thyroid through; Stress hormones Inflammation Digestive problems; dysbiosis/infections Provoking autoimmunity Lets work through each one of these. Stress hormones, specifically cortisol, are intimately linked to your blood sugar levels and imbalances in stress hormones levels will cause problems with your thyroid. Said another way, blood sugar levels have a profound impact on stress hormones and stress hormones effect your thyroid (see picture). When cortisol levels become too high you will experience a decrease in TSH. When cortisol levels become too low you will have impaired conversion of T4 to T3. 1-8 Cortisol actually acts to increase your blood sugar levels, this will have more relevance in a moment. When people eat too much carbohydrate they tend to fall into a pattern called reactive hypoglycemia, here is what this looks like. You wake up and have a banana, bowl of cereal and some OJ. This, to some, is known as a healthy breakfast but for most people this is a fast ticket to numerous health problems. This large bolus of carbohydrate will cause a rush of glucose into your systems causing a blood sugar spike. Now this blood sugar spike is damaging to tissues of your body so the body reacts b Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes cases in the developing world and it is still increasing in an alarm rate. In 2016, it is estimated that 1 in 10 US individuals have type 2 diabetes (the increase rate of type 1 diabetes is much smaller). By 2050, it is estimated that 1 in 3 individuals will suffer from type 2 diabetes. From the statistics, overweight individuals who are age 40 or older are in the highest risk percentile. How does this information important for women? In the United States, diabetes is ranked as the number 6 most common cause of death for females between 45 to 54 years old and the number 4 common cause of death for females who are between 55 to 64 years old. It seems that as women grow older and reach their menopause stage, they become much more susceptible to develop diabetes. The question is whether menopause can drastically increase the risk of developing diabetes? This article will answer this question along with covering various topics that concerns menopause and its effect on diabetes: Can Menopause Can Trigger Diabetes? We would like to give you a straightforward answer for this question. However, sadly, health research scientists are still struggling to find the answer because it is difficult to separate the correlation and effects of menopause from the correlation and effects of age and weight. In 2011, a scientific correlation study suggests that after taking the age factor out from the correlation study, there is “no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk” (Kim, 2011). Yet there have been studies suggesting that progesterone is correlated with the development diabetes. Although we cannot give you a straight yes or Continue reading >>

Wine And Your Waistline: How Alcohol Affects Your Health, Hormones, And Fat Loss

Wine And Your Waistline: How Alcohol Affects Your Health, Hormones, And Fat Loss

For many of us, alcohol goes hand in hand with fun and relaxation. It is called “happy” hour, after all. So it’s no wonder why many women want to know how much booze they can get away with drinking and still achieve their health, fitness, and fat-loss goals. As a wine lover myself, I really, really want to tell you that this article will end with the kind of advice I’d like to hear: “Go ahead! Drink as much wine as you want and enjoy effortless weight loss!” Unfortunately, it’s just not that simple. And as fun and delicious as a glass of wine can be, it may not support your current goals. I’m sorry. Really, I am. The Chemistry Of Cocktails It’s likely that you’ve heard from a fitness expert or read in a magazine that alcohol turns instantly to fat. That’s not exactly true, but it’s become a go-to sound byte. Here’s what really happens: Once alcohol (a.k.a. ethanol) passes your lips and gets absorbed into your system, your body converts it to acetaldehyde, then to acetate, and finally to acetyl-coA. So, luckily, your body doesn’t convert ethanol or its metabolites directly into fat. In fact, your body can use both acetate and acetyl-coA as fuel. However, as far as fuel sources go, they are both pretty inefficient. That means that it takes more calories to convert them into energy than it does to convert glucose, AKA sugar, into energy. Well, that sounds good, right? You would think. However, since your body doesn’t like inefficiencies, it doesn’t like to burn acetate or acetyl-coA for fuel. But because our bodies can’t store the metabolites, we still have to burn them off. ASAP. So, while your body’s cells work on burning through that acetate and acetyl-coA build up first, other fuel sources, like sugar and fat, just hang around. In ot Continue reading >>

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