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How Does Alpha Lipoic Acid Help Diabetes?

30 Proven Alpha Lipoic Acid Benefits + Side Effects, Dosage

30 Proven Alpha Lipoic Acid Benefits + Side Effects, Dosage

Home Natural Substances Antioxidant 30 Proven Alpha Lipoic Acid Benefits + Side Effects, Dosage 30 Proven Alpha Lipoic Acid Benefits + Side Effects, Dosage Lipoic acid is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound that protects the brain, helps with weight loss, improves diabetes, decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease and alleviates pain. And these are only some of the numerous benefits of this universal antioxidant. Read on to learn more about how lipoic acid helps increase your wellbeing. Lipoic acid (LA), also known as alpha-lipoic (ALA) acid, R-lipoic acid, or thioctic acid, is a disulphide-containing compound ( R ), found inside every cell of the body ( R ). It is called the universal antioxidant ( R ). Lipoic acid acts as a powerful antioxidant both inside and outside of the cells ( R , R ). Lipoic acid scavenges several reactive oxygen species ( ROS ) ( R ). Lipoic acid helps to regenerate both fat and water soluble antioxidant vitamins (such as vitamins C and E ) ( R , R ). Lipoic acid improves sugar and fat metabolism ( R ). Lipoic acid is an essential cofactor for mitochondrial respiratory enzymes that improves mitochondrial function ( R ). Lipoic acid exerts a rejuvenating impact on mitochondria by protecting them against the higher levels of ROS they produce during the aging process ( R ). Lipoic acid also has anti-inflammatory action, independently of its antioxidant activity ( R ). A healthy body makes enough lipoic acid to supply its energy requirements; therefore, there is no daily requirement for this supplement. However, several medical conditions appear to be accompanied by low levels of lipoic acid specifically, diabetes , liver cirrhosis , and heart disease ( R ). In Europe, lipoic acid is licensed for the treatment of diabetic neu Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

What is type 2 diabetes? Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population. What are the symptoms? Many symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst or irritability, can seem unimportant, which is one of the reasons why the disease often goes undiagnosed. However, early detection is very important because it can reduce the odds of developing the dangerous complications of diabetes. Common symptoms include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought under control via treatment type 2 diabetes (and type 1 diabetes as well) can lead to a number of serious complications: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure within the eye that can lead to vision loss. They are also 60 percent more likely than normal to develop cataracts, which cloud the lens of the eye, blocking light and blurring vision. They are also at risk of diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina that is the leading cause of impaired vision in the United States. High blood pressure: This disorder occurs at twice the normal rate among diabetics. Heart disease: Deaths from heart disease among diabetics are two to four Continue reading >>

Lipoic Acid

Lipoic Acid

Given the rising epidemic of diabetes and its devastating complications, natural strategies that support healthy blood sugar (glucose) and protect against oxidative stress offer hope for many individuals. Metabolic syndrome—a combination of risk factors such as insulin resistance, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)—increases one’s risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Widely known as a potent and effective antioxidant, lipoic acid demonstrates a multitude of unique properties. Regulated as a drug in several European countries (where it is approved for the treatment of diabetes-related complications, certain complications of alcoholism, and a variety of liver conditions),1,2 lipoic acid is an important component of every informed individual’s health maintenance regime. In emerging research, lipoic acid has shown impressive benefits in the context of glaucoma, migraine, stroke, as well as bone health. Protection Against Oxidative Stress One of the underlying problems in diabetes is oxidative stress and the production of free radicals. These free radicals circulate in the body, attacking and damaging tissues. Since people with diabetes have high glucose levels, they are more prone to oxidative stress, which may contribute to the long-term complications of the disease. Antioxidants such as lipoic acid prevent this damage by neutralizing free radicals and reducing oxidative stress.3,4 Lipoic acid is an unusual antioxidant because it can act in both water-soluble and fat-soluble domains in cells and tissues. Thanks to these qualities, it is easily absorbed and transported into many organs and systems within the body, for example, the brain, liver, and nerves. Contrast this with antioxidants such as vitamin C, which Continue reading >>

Good News For Diabetics

Good News For Diabetics

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Alpha-lipoic acid can slow or even prevent nerve damage in diabetics.1 Speaking before the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting in San Diego in June, Professor Lester Packer, a molecular and cell biologist, delivered a hopeful message regarding a problem that 70% of all diabetics have been unable to escape. The vibrant, 70-year-old, Dr Packer of the University of California at Berkeley, recommended alpha-lipoic acid not only to diabetics but to everyone. "This is a treatment that can't do any damage, and there is even evidence that it can slow down the aging process," he said. A powerful antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid combats cellular injuries caused by free radicals, those unstable, highly reactive molecules that are byproducts of both normal and stressed cell activity. Our bodies manufacture antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, that disarm and neutralize free radicals, but only to a certain extent. They are not able to adequately handle the continuous barrage of stressors we are subject to, such as ultraviolet radiation, cosmic rays, smoke, industrial toxins, and even natural components or metabolic products of food. Thus, without additional protection by supplemental antioxidants, excessive free radicals can damage vital cell structures and eventually initiate most chronic and degenerative diseases. The Toll of Diabetes As many as 200,000 deaths are attributable to diabetes every year in the United States, and nerve damage is the complication most directly implicated. When blood glucose levels are continuously elevated, as is often the case in diabetes, nerve damage can affect the heart, eyes, kidneys, sex organs, and legs and feet, the most severe consequence of which can be amputation of the feet. Statistics from the American Diabetes Continue reading >>

Effect Of Α-lipoic Acid On Platelet Reactivity In Type 1 Diabetic Patients

Effect Of Α-lipoic Acid On Platelet Reactivity In Type 1 Diabetic Patients

Abstract OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is associated with increased platelet reactivity. We investigated whether α-lipoic acid (ALA) has any effect on platelet reactivity in these patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 51 type 1 diabetic patients to ALA (600 mg once daily) or placebo for 5 weeks. Platelet reactivity was evaluated by the PFA-100 method and by measuring CD41 and CD62 platelet expression. C-reactive protein (CRP) and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α serum levels also were measured. RESULTS Baseline variables were similar in the two groups. After treatment, closure time was longer (P = 0.006) and CD62P platelet expression was lower, both before (P = 0.002) and after (P = 0.009) ADP stimulation in the ALA group compared with the placebo group. CRP and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α levels showed no differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Our data show that ALA reduces measures of platelet reactivity ex vivo in type 1 diabetic patients, independently of antioxidant or anti-inflammatory effects. Type 1 diabetes is associated with the increased risk of cardiovascular disease (1). Higher platelet reactivity has been reported in diabetic patients (2,3). α-Lipoic acid (ALA) acts as a cofactor in multienzyme complexes, including pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase, and is licensed for treatment of symptomatic diabetic neuropathy (4,5). Recent studies have suggested that ALA has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant proprieties (6–8) that might eventually improve platelet function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study to assess whether ALA has any effects on platelet reactivity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in type 1 diabetic patients. We enrolled 51 type 1 di Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid: How To Treat The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Alpha Lipoic Acid: How To Treat The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

There are no miracle cure-alls, silver bullets, or magic pills that will get you trim, fit and healthy, but after an exhaustive search and rigorous testing , The Sherpa has pinpointed a few natural health therapies that DO help and ferreted out the scams to avoid...you may be shocked by what we've discovered. Alpha Lipoic Acid: How to Treat the REAL Cause of Type 2 Diabetes Ask someone what disease they fear the most and many will answer type 2 diabetesand for good reason. One out of every 10 Americans has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and millions more are walking around undiagnosed every day. And if the disease isnt bad enough, there are the terrifying complications, including: The only thing more frightening than what can happen once you get type 2 diabetes is the startling ineffectiveness of the treatments that are most often recommended. While doctors will tell you, often offhandedly, to lose weight and exercise, they are more likely to prescribe a drug or even insulin, which is a HUGE mistake. If you have type 2 diabetes, you already have too much insulin in your system. So adding more insulin is like adding gasoline to a fire. Its the LAST thing you need and it can have serious consequences.1 For example, too much insulin has been shown to: Elevate blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels; Increase your risk for Alzheimers and cancer.2 Ultimately, the single most effect thing you can do if you have type 2 diabetes is to modify your diet to include only nutrient-dense, low-glycemic load whole foods and to get moderate daily exercise. But that requires fundamental changes to your lifestyle, which can take time; so in addition to that, you may consider using a treatment that helps your cells become more sensitive to the insulin thats already Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid – A Viable Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy

Alpha-lipoic Acid – A Viable Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy now affects an estimated 15-18 million Americans. That means that close to 70% of the almost 26 million Americans with type 2 diabetes suffer from this sometimes debilitating condition. And while there are approximately 100 different causes of neuropathy, diabetes ranks highest on the list, accounting for a full one third of neuropathy cases. Symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy can be quite aggressive and include pain, loss of sensation, tingling and even weakness, typically affecting hands and feet. Clinicians and researchers in Europe have long known about the effectiveness of a common nutritional supplement, alpha-lipoic acid, as an effective approach to diabetic neuropathy. But here in America most patients are given pharmaceuticals to treat the symptoms. And yet, wonderful clinical data now confirms the profound effectiveness of alpha-lipoic acid in treating diabetic neuropathy. Both the well-conducted research as well as my own clinical experience in using this nonprescription approach to treating diabetic neuropathy will keep alpha-lipoic acid in my tool kit. Lipoic acid is a potent and protective antioxidant that is both fat and water-soluble. That means it can penetrate virtually all of the body’s tissues, including the brain and nerves. In addition, it acts as a heavy metal chelator, helping the body rid itself of toxic metals like lead and mercury. It also helps maintain levels of another brain important antioxidant, glutathione. That’s why I’ve included lipoic acid as one of my “super seven” fundamental supplements. For more information, order your copy of Grain Brain today and join Dr. Perlmutter’s email list. Read Next Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid And Glycaemic Control In Diabetic Neuropathies At Type 2 Diabetes Treatment.

Alpha Lipoic Acid And Glycaemic Control In Diabetic Neuropathies At Type 2 Diabetes Treatment.

Alpha lipoic acid and glycaemic control in diabetic neuropathies at type 2 diabetes treatment. Department of Internal Medicine, Cantonal Hospital "Dr. Irfan Ljubijankic", Bihac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. [email protected] INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic, chronic and incurable disease which reduces span and quality of life. Over 50% of diabetic patients have clinical manifestations of diabetic neuropathy. AIM: To show a positive influence of alpha lipoic acid on clinically manifested diabetic neuropathy symptoms as well as the effect of alpha lipoic acid in patients glycaemic control. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Testing has been conducted in Cantonal Hospital"Irfan Ljubijankic MD" in Bihac and included 20 diabetes type 2 patients who were diagnosed with clinically manifested diabetic neuropathy. All the patients' conditions were evaluated by: medical history, clinical parameters, detailed internal examination, laboratory analyses for glycaemic control assessment and mono filament test. They were treated with oral anti-diabetics and insulin as well as with alpha lipoic acid preparation in duration of four months. They were divided into two groups, with good (HbA1c < 7%) and poor (HbAc > or = 7%) glycaemic control. Medical control has been conducted four months after the research started. RESULTS: Twenty patients took part in the research, 7 male and 13 female. The average age of the patients was 58.6 in the first and 55.6 years in the second group. The average patients' disease duration was 13.4 +/- 6.6 years in the first and 11.2 +/- 5.4 years in the second group. The difference in gender, average age and disease duration in both groups statistically is not significant (p < or = 0.05). The number of negative points after the therapy has been reduced for 56.4% i Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alpha Lipoic Acid

Diabetes And Alpha Lipoic Acid

Go to: Introduction Lipoic acid (LA) or α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring compound that is also known as 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid or thioctic acid (Busby et al., 1999). It is synthesized enzymatically in plant and animal mitochondria from octanoic acid and cysteine (as a sulfur source). ALA acts as a cofactor for pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase activity (Schmidt et al., 1994), and is also required for the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, a critical step bridging glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (Reed, 1998). The presence of an asymmetric carbon produces two optical isomers R-LA and S-LA. Only the naturally occurring R isomer is bound to protein and acts as an essential cofactor in biological systems (Reed, 1998). However, synthetic LA is a racemic mixture of R and S isoforms, where S-LA can prevent the polymerization of R-LA to enhance its bioavailability (Shay et al., 2009). In cells containing mitochondria, ALA is reduced in an NADH-dependent reaction with lipoamide dehydrogenase to form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), whereas in cells that lack mitochondria, ALA can instead be reduced to DHLA via NADPH with glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin reductases (Jones et al., 2002). Unlike GSH, for which only the reduced form is an antioxidant, both the oxidized and reduced forms of LA are powerful antioxidants whose functions include: (1) quenching of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (2) regeneration of exogenous and endogenous antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and GSH, (3) chelation of metal ions, and (4) reparation of oxidized proteins (5) regulation of gene transcription (6) inhibition of the activation of nuclear factor kapp B (NF-κB; Biewenga et al., 1997; Packer, 1998; Zhang and Frei, 2001; Figure 1). Continue reading >>

Amazing Benefits Of Alpha Lipoic Acid In Treating Diabetes & More

Amazing Benefits Of Alpha Lipoic Acid In Treating Diabetes & More

Amazing Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid in Treating Diabetes & More Have you been keeping up with my Secret Weapon of Mass Destruction Series ? If you have great! (Go here for the last post.) If you want to start at the beginning, go HERE . In this excerpt of my Secret Weapon of Mass Destruction Series, I want to present another amazing protector of glutathione. This little jewel of an antioxidant is going to truly provide you some POWER, while also potentially cleaning up debris, e.g. the ravages of diabetes. Keep reading to find out more about Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA). ALA is a potent and protective antioxidant that has been shown to regenerate other antioxidants, such as glutathione, vitamin E and vitamin C, and to prevent protein glycosylation (reaction with sugar and carbohydrate). It is both fat and water-soluble, therefore it can penetrate basically all the bodys tissues (including the brain and nerves). ALA has also been shown to enhance glucose uptake in skeletal muscle tissue, thus improving glucose regulation in people with diabetes mellitus. ALA helps prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in people with diabetes. It has also been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a common complication in diabetes that affects over 18 million Americans. Thats huge, since there are over 26 million people suffering from type 2 diabetes in this countrythats about 70% of the population with type 2 diabetes being a victim to neuropathy. Neuropathy is an aggressive and painful condition, resulting in loss of sensation, tingling and weakness, predominantly in the hands and feet, and can result in foot ulcers & amputation. To protect yourself from these devastating conditions, access my E-Scription: Standing on Your Own Two Feet with Diabetes: Continue reading >>

Alternative Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Alternative Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes doesn't just affect blood sugar and insulin secretion—it also can lead to a host of other problems including kidney damage, blood vessel thickening, nerve damage and pain. Find out more below about common alternative and complementary methods, vitamins, minerals, herbs and foods used to treat type 2 diabetes and other conditions associated with it. Acetyl L-Carnitine In a double-blind study of people with diabetic neuropathy, supplementing with acetyl-L-carnitine was significantly more effective than a placebo in improving subjective symptoms of neuropathy and objective measures of nerve function. People who received 1,000 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine three times per day tended to fare better than those who received 500 mg three times per day. Aloe Two small controlled human trials have found that aloe, either alone or in combination with the oral hypoglycemic drug, glibenclamide, effectively lowers blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Alpha Lipoic Acid Alpha lipoic acid is a powerful natural antioxidant. Preliminary and double blind trials have found that supplementing 600 to 1,200 mg of lipoic acid per day improves insulin sensitivity and the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. In a preliminary study, supplementing with 600 mg of alpha lipoic acid per day for 18 months slowed the progression of kidney damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. American Ginseng In a small pilot study, 3 grams of American ginseng was found to lower the rise in blood sugar following the consumption of a drink high in glucose by people with type 2 diabetes. Antioxidants Because oxidation damage is believed to play a role in the development of diabetic retinopathy, antioxidant nutrients might be protective. One doctor has administered a daily regimen of 500 mcg selenium, 80 Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Alpha Lipoic Acid | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Have recently heard about alpha lipoic acid, had a look on Google and as usual I just get information overload ( small brain capacity Best source of information for me is straight from the horse's mouth/ people who actually know. 1 . Is there anyone taking ala as a supplement. 3 . As a supplement what is ala used for. Info so far suggests ala can help with insulin resistance and nervous system but REAL info is what I prefer. One thing I noticed was I needed slightly less insulin. It's often used for the first signs of neuropathy, I think, as it's been mentioned in a thread on here, but I understand some people take it for a number of reasons so that's not it's only use. I also take B vits like Benfotiamine, and a few other supplements, including Vit D, so hard to tell which of those helps : D Hey @azure . Thanks for the reply. Wasn't aware of ala. Ignorance is bliss. May use my H and B bonus points and give it a try. I was taking r-ala 80% which was about 16 for 60 tablets of 100mg. I was advised to use 3 a day so worked out expensive. So due to 6wks holiday costs I suspended its purchase. Yes it reduced my insulin need by a third. I advise it to type 2 insulin users. Apparently Germany prescribes it with insulin for insulin users but nhs doesnt. I have noticed tingerling toes since suspending it's use. I've taken it in big doses for 6 months, as is licensed for peripheral neuropathy in Germany (and they usually get things right). I take 600mg twice a day. There has been a definite reduction in tingling/numbness in my hands and toes. Obviously this could be because my diabetic control is better since on LCHF diet. I am also taking a lot of other suppl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can Dietary Supplements Help?

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can Dietary Supplements Help?

A healthy diet is a critical factor in controlling blood sugar, which is key in managing diabetes and preventing or slowing the progression of diabetes complications such as diabetic neuropathy. Dietary supplements also may play a role. Diabetic neuropathy is damage to nerves caused by excess blood sugar, inflammation and blocked small blood vessels associated with diabetes. Left unchecked, diabetic neuropathy can cause complications such as pain and tingling in the hands and feet; it can also result in digestive difficulties and sexual problems. Advanced neuropathy in the feet can lead to the need for amputation of a toe, foot or lower leg. Eating a healthy diet is an important part of managing your diabetes and may help prevent its complications, including diabetic neuropathy. Tight blood sugar management might also help slow the progression of nerve damage. Dietary supplements also may play a role in managing diabetic neuropathy, although more research is needed. Talk to your doctor before adding a dietary supplement because some may interfere with certain diabetes medications, and some can increase the risk of kidney problems. How dietary supplements might help Various nutrients in food play a role in the protection, repair and function of tissues affected by diabetic neuropathy. So, researchers are interested in nutrition and nutritional supplements to help prevent and manage diabetic neuropathy. Research in this field is still relatively new, and the results of clinical studies have yielded mixed results. However, the following dietary supplements may have some limited benefit in preventing and managing diabetic neuropathy. Vitamin B-12 Vitamin B-12 is present naturally in some foods. It plays a number of roles in the body, including helping with proper nerve func Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid: This Antioxidant Can Smash Insulin Resistance And Autoimmune Disease

Alpha Lipoic Acid: This Antioxidant Can Smash Insulin Resistance And Autoimmune Disease

I first became aware of the alpha lipoic regimen by Dr. Burt Berkson in the late 90’s. Early on in his career, while an internist, he was given several patients who were expected to die from hepatitis C. His job was more or less to simply baby sit them in the ICU and watch them die. But Dr. Berkson was a rebel at heart and he simply couldn’t do that. Instead he called an associate at the National Institutes of Health and found out how he could treat them. He learned that alpha lipoic acid had some impressive experimental support. Remarkably, although these patients were expected to die within a few weeks, they all completely recovered! However not all went well for Dr. Berkson as he made his superiors look foolish and they simply could not tolerate that so rather than embrace his findings, they actively suppressed the results and made his life miserable for showing them up. This was a pivotal moment in Dr. Berskson’s career and caused him to make choices that eventually led to where he is at now. Since then, Dr. Berkson has lectured all over the world on this topic, and published a study on the use of antioxidants for the treatment of hepatitis C. His first book, The Alpha-Lipoic Acid Breakthrough was published in 1998. As many of you already know, I am not fond of recommending many supplements, but I do believe that antioxidants make sense for many of us. Why You Need Antioxidants Your entire body, including your DNA, is under endless, daily assault from a variety of sources, from poor diets to pollution. Think of your cells, including your brain cells, each getting hit by free-radicals thousands of times a day. This violent process is called "oxidation,” which damages your cells. Enter antioxidants. They include vitamins and other nutrients that target free ra Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid: Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Fight Diabetes!

Alpha Lipoic Acid: Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Fight Diabetes!

What is it about foods like broccoli and spinach that make them so healthy? There’s the fiber, vitamins and minerals, of course, but then there’s other important chemical compounds we call “antioxidants” too — like alpha lipoic acid (ALA). Chances are you’ve heard a lot about the many benefits of various antioxidants and high-antioxidant foods — fighting inflammation, helping beat cancer or heart disease, warding off depression and cognitive decline, and so much more — but have you ever wondered what exactly antioxidants are and how they work in the body? Alpha lipoic acid — one kind of antioxidant — is a type of compound found in plant foods we commonly eat that scavenges free radicals, fights inflammation and slows the aging process. But perhaps its most famous use is in treating diabetes naturally. Humans also make a small amount of ALA on their own, although the concentration in our bloodstreams goes up substantially when we eat a healthy diet. Naturally abundant in foods like green veggies, potatoes and certain types of yeast, lipoic acid is similar to a vitamin in that it can also be man-made in a lab so it can be taken as an anti-inflammatory supplement (which is then called alpha lipoic acid). How Alpha Lipoic Acid Works Lipoic acid is found in the body and also synthesized by plants and animals. It’s present in every cell inside the body and helps turn glucose into “fuel” for the body to run off of. Is it “essential” that you consume a certain doseage of alpha lipoic acid every day? Not exactly. Even though we can make some of it on our own without supplements or outside food sources (which is why it’s not considered an “essential nutrient”), eating an antioxidant-packed diet plus potentially using ALA supplements can increas Continue reading >>

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