diabetestalk.net

How Does A Diabetic Coma Differ From Insulin Shock?

What Is The Difference Between Insulin Shock & A Diabetic Coma?

What Is The Difference Between Insulin Shock & A Diabetic Coma?

Nearly 26 million Americans had diabetes in 2010, and many were not being adequately treated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most people have heard about the long-term complications of poorly controlled diabetes, such as kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and blindness. People with diabetes can also develop acute complications. If your blood glucose gets too high due to inadequate treatment, or falls too low due to overly aggressive treatment, you could suddenly lose consciousness. Insulin shock, diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are all potential causes of diabetic coma. Insulin Shock Insulin is a hormone your pancreas normally produces in response to rising glucose levels. Many people with diabetes must take insulin to prevent their blood glucose from rising too high. If you take more insulin than your body needs, you could suddenly develop hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. People who take insulin and exercise without eating or drink too much alcohol are particularly susceptible to hypoglycemia. Insulin shock, which is a form of diabetic coma, may occur if your blood glucose falls too low to support your brain’s metabolic demands -- usually below 50 mg/dL. Seizures may occur before the onset of coma. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Just as a low blood glucose level can trigger unconsciousness, extremely high blood glucose levels can alter brain function and lead to coma. Diabetic ketoacidosis, which usually affects people with type 1 diabetes, happens when you don’t have enough insulin in your system. DKA may be the initial manifestation of newly developed diabetes, or it may result from a skipped insulin dose in a person who has already been diagnosed with diabetes. Infections and alcohol abuse can also trigge Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma

Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma

Home Home Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma Diabetes, Insulin Shock And Diabetic Coma Login or register now to gain instant access to the rest of this premium content! "I'm not sure what's wrong with her. Suddenly she just sat down and seemed really confused. We went for a jog this morning but didn't have time to eat breakfast. We were on the way to get a late lunch when this happened." Diabetes is caused by the body's inability to process and use the type of sugar carried by the bloodstream to the body's cells. Sugar is an essential nutrient. The cells of the body need both oxygen and sugar to survive. The body produces a hormone called insulin, which enables sugar carried by the blood to move into individual cells, where it is used as fuel. If the body does not produce enough insulin, cells become "starved" for sugar. This condition is called diabetes. A person with diabetes must take supplemental insulin to bring insulin levels up to normal. Mild diabetes can sometimes be treated by oral medicine rather than insulin. Diabetes is a serious medical condition. Therefore, all diabetic patients who are sick must be evaluated and treated in an appropriate medical facility. Two specific things can go wrong in the management of diabetes: insulin shock and diabetic coma. Both are emergencies that you must deal with as a first responder. Insulin shock occurs if the body has enough insulin but not enough blood sugar. A diabetic may take insulin in the morning and then alter the usual routine by not eating or by exercising vigorously. In either case, the level of blood sugar drops and the patient suffers insulin shock. The signs and symptoms of insulin shock are similar to those of other types of shock. Suspect insulin shock if a patient has a history of diabetes or is Continue reading >>

The Life-or-death Difference Between Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

The Life-or-death Difference Between Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

Today over 10.9 million seniors over age 65, or 26.9% of the aging population suffers from diabetes. Diabetics face a number of challenging health complications, including eye, foot, skin, and hearing problems as well as neuropathy, kidney disease, mental health issues, and much more. Two commonly misunderstood diabetic emergencies are insulin shock and diabetic coma. The terminology is confusing, and is mistreated or misdiagnosed, these conditions could result in death. If someone you know is a diabetic or you live with diabetes yourself, its critical to have a grasp on the differing symptoms that insulin shock and diabetic coma present with. Here’s how to properly identify the difference between insulin shock versus a diabetic coma. What is Insulin Shock? Insulin shock is the result of hypoglycemia, a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to unconsciousness. A person experiencing acute insulin shock may exhibit early symptoms such as dizziness, hunger, and shakiness that may progress to tingling sensation throughout the body, physical weaknesses, rapid heartbeat, and labored breathing. This condition can cause seizures and permanent brain damage. What is Diabetic Coma? A diabetic coma is a serious, but reversible, condition that has a longer onset. While insulin shock happens quickly, it can take days for a diabetic coma to set in, and happens frequently to those who do not realize they are diabetic yet. In many cases, patients experience symptoms such as excess thirst or urination, several weeks prior to diagnosis. Diabetic comas can come as the result of both extremely high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and very low blood sugar (hypoglycermia) and are most common among seniors. Older adults may have an altered sense of thirst and are more likely to become dehydrat Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Different From Insulin Shock, Role Of Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia Crucial

Diabetic Coma Different From Insulin Shock, Role Of Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia Crucial

The role of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are crucial in diabetic coma. A diabetic coma is a complication of diabetes that leads to unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can result from both hyperglycemia – high blood sugar – or hypoglycemia – low blood sugar. A person in a diabetic coma is still alive, but they do not respond to light, sound, touch or any stimulation. If left untreated a diabetic coma can be fatal. A diabetic coma can be confused with an insulin shock, but although the two may appear similar, they do contain their own unique differences. Diabetic coma vs. insulin shock Insulin shock is the body’s reaction to a drop in blood sugar – or hypoglycemia – as a result of too much insulin. Even though the condition is called insulin shock, there is no shock involved and insulin isn’t the main culprit. Even people without diabetes can experience insulin shock if their blood sugar drops low enough. The condition is called a shock because it makes the body react similarly to when blood pressure drops – a fight or flight response. Symptoms of insulin shock are fast breathing, rapid pulse, dizziness, headache, numbness and hunger. Diabetic coma, on the other hand, causes unconsciousness that can occur over the course of days or even weeks and also cause dehydration. Although both conditions must be treated immediately, diabetic coma can be fatal. Causes of diabetic coma There are various causes of diabetic coma, including diabetic ketoacidosis, diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome, and hypoglycemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis: This is a condition where muscles become starved for energy, so the body begins breaking down fat from storage. This forms a toxin known as ketones and, if untreated, can contribute to diabetic coma. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome: Diabetic Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Vs. Insulin Shock

Diabetic Coma Vs. Insulin Shock

Diabetes is a life-threatening disease that affects lots of people annually. A diabetic is susceptible to many complications, like abnormal changes in the blood pressure, strokes, heart and vision problems, etc. Hypoglycemia or insulin shock as it is sometimes referred, and diabetic coma are also common diabetes complications. In this article we are going to discuss both diabetic coma and insulin shock in detail to clearly understand the difference between them. Insulin Shock Insulin shock is also called hypoglycemia, and it is usually seen in diabetic patients. Basically, extreme low levels of sugar in the blood causes an insulin shock. For the body to function in the right way, a normal sugar level should be maintained. Fluctuations in the blood sugar level causes many complications. The sugar level should not go too high or too low. The pancreas secrete a hormone called insulin, that maintains the levels of glucose or sugar in the blood. Insulin then stimulates the cells to supply glucose in the blood to various organs in the body. In hypoglycemia too much insulin is secreted by the pancreas, and this leads to lowered blood sugar level (a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL is considered low). Hypoglycemia can also occur if you are taking excess diabetes medications or are eating food that is low on carbohydrates. The common symptoms are abnormal increase in the heartbeat rate, weakness, uneasiness and discomfort, vision problems like blurry vision, headache, feeling of extreme hunger, facing trouble while sleeping, tingling in hands and feet, and fainting. Extreme case of hypoglycemia that causes seizures, hallucinations, and coma is referred as an insulin shock. Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency, and should be treated immediately as it can cause permanent dama Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Vs Insulin Shock

Diabetic Coma Vs Insulin Shock

Insulin shock refers to the body’s reaction to too little sugar — hypoglycemia — often caused by too much insulin. Diabetic coma refers to a victim of high blood sugar — hyperglycemia — who becomes confused or unconscious. These terms are confusing, and not because my blood sugar is too high. They don’t have any connection to reality. Indeed, if I was nicknaming medical conditions today, I would switch these. Insulin Shock Insulin shock makes it sound like the body is in shock, which isn’t true. Shock is, first and foremost, a lack of blood flow to important areas of the body, like the brain. It usually comes with a very low blood pressure. The most common symptom of low blood sugar is confusion (yeah, I know, that’s supposed to go with diabetic coma — just stay with me here), not a low blood pressure. In fact, insulin shock doesn’t affect the blood pressure much at all. Insulin shock also implies that insulin is to blame, but insulin — at least from injections — is not required for someone to develop low blood sugar. Plenty of diabetics take pills, which are not insulin, to control their blood sugar levels. Some diabetics control their blood sugar levels simply by watching their diets. To make it even worse, some folks get low blood sugar even though they’re not diabetic at all, which means they would have no reason to take insulin. The pancreas secrete a hormone called insulin, that maintains the levels of glucose or sugar in the blood. Insulin then stimulates the cells to supply glucose in the blood to various organs in the body. In hypoglycemia or insulin shock too much insulin is secreted by the pancreas, and this leads to lowered blood sugar level (a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL is considered low). Hypoglycemia can also occur if you ar Continue reading >>

First Aid Phraseology: Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

First Aid Phraseology: Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

Sometimes in medical care--especially first aid--we try to make the terminology more user friendly. It's led to terms like heart attack or stroke (and now stroke is being changed to brain attack). Some of the terms make sense, but there are others that simply don't work for anyone other than the doctors who thought them up in the first place. Insulin shock and diabetic coma are two terms that just don't make sense. Insulin shock refers to the body's reaction to too little sugar—hypoglycemia—often caused by too much insulin. Diabetic coma refers to a victim of high blood sugar—hyperglycemia—who becomes confused or unconscious. These terms are confusing, and not because my blood sugar is too low. They don't have any connection to reality. Indeed, if I was nicknaming medical conditions today, I would switch these. Insulin Shock Insulin shock makes it sound like the body is in shock, which isn't true. Shock is, first and foremost, a lack of blood flow to important areas of the body, like the brain. It usually comes with a very low blood pressure. The most common symptom of low blood sugar is confusion (yeah, I know, that's supposed to go with diabetic coma—just stay with me here), not a low blood pressure. In fact, insulin shock doesn't affect the blood pressure much at all. Insulin shock also implies that insulin is to blame, but insulin—at least from injections—is not required for someone to develop low blood sugar. Plenty of diabetics take pills, which do not contain insulin, to control their blood sugar levels. Some diabetics control their blood sugar levels simply by watching their diets. To make it even worse, some folks get low blood sugar even though they're not diabetic at all, which means they would have no reason to take insulin or pills (although t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma found in people with diabetes mellitus. It is a medical emergency.[1] Three different types of diabetic coma are identified: Severe low blood sugar in a diabetic person Diabetic ketoacidosis (usually type 1) advanced enough to result in unconsciousness from a combination of a severely increased blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (usually type 2) in which an extremely high blood sugar level and dehydration alone are sufficient to cause unconsciousness. In most medical contexts, the term diabetic coma refers to the diagnostical dilemma posed when a physician is confronted with an unconscious patient about whom nothing is known except that they have diabetes. An example might be a physician working in an emergency department who receives an unconscious patient wearing a medical identification tag saying DIABETIC. Paramedics may be called to rescue an unconscious person by friends who identify them as diabetic. Brief descriptions of the three major conditions are followed by a discussion of the diagnostic process used to distinguish among them, as well as a few other conditions which must be considered. An estimated 2 to 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from at least one episode of diabetic coma in their lifetimes as a result of severe hypoglycemia. Types[edit] Severe hypoglycemia[edit] People with type 1 diabetes mellitus who must take insulin in full replacement doses are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. It is usually mild enough to reverse by eating or drinking carbohydrates, but blood glucose occasionally can fall fast enough and low enough to produce unconsciousness before hypoglycemia can be recognized and reversed. Hypoglycemia can be severe enough to cause un Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Diabetic Coma And Insulin Shock?

What's The Difference Between Diabetic Coma And Insulin Shock?

Symptoms of a diabetic coma include labored breathing, breath that smells fruity, nausea and vomiting, excessive thirst, dry mouth, flushed skin, confusion, and loss of consciousness. A person suffering from insulin shock may experience a tingling sensation in the mouth, hands or other body part. Symptoms of insulin shock also include physical weakness, headaches, abdominal pain, labored breathing, a rapid heartbeat, tremors and irritability. A person with symptoms of either diabetic coma or insulin shock should seek prompt medical attention. (This answer provided for NATA by the Southern Connecticut State University Athletic Training Education Program) Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

What is insulin shock? After taking an insulin shot, a person with diabetes might on occasion forget to eat (or eat less than they normally do). If this happens, they may end up with too much insulin in their blood. This, in turn, can lead to hypoglycemia, also called low blood sugar. A serious condition called insulin shock may occur if a person: ignores mild hypoglycemia takes too much insulin by mistake misses a meal completely does excessive unusual exercise without changing their carbohydrate intake Insulin shock is a diabetic emergency. It involves symptoms that, if left untreated, can lead to diabetic coma, brain damage, and even death. How insulin works When we consume food or beverages that contain carbohydrates, the body converts them into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that fuels the body, giving it the energy it needs to perform everyday functions. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key. It opens the door in the body’s cells so they can absorb glucose and use it as fuel. People with diabetes may lack enough insulin or have cells that aren’t able to use insulin as they should. If the cells of the body aren’t able to absorb the glucose properly, it causes excess glucose in blood. This is called high blood glucose, which is linked with a number of health issues. High blood glucose can cause eye and foot problems, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Insulin shots help people with diabetes use glucose more efficiently. Taking an insulin shot before eating helps the body absorb and use glucose from the food. The result is a more balanced and healthy blood sugar level. Usually, it works great. Sometimes, however, things go wrong. What causes insulin shock? Having too much insulin in your blood can lead to having too little gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

What Is It? If you are diabetic, you should know that Diabetic Shock or Extreme Hypoglycemia is a serious health risk. It is medical emergency wherein sugar levels fall below 70 mg/dl. Diabetic shock symptoms come from the body’s reaction to too much insulin or too little sugar. So, it’s crucial for every diabetic to know why it happens, what to expect and how to treat it. Why Does Diabetic Shock Happen? Insulin helps sugar enter the cells. Diabetic shock or Insulin Reaction is the result of having too much insulin or too little sugar in the body, at any point of time. The condition could happen due to: Excess medication Eating less Skipping a meal Exercising too much The intake of too much alcohol Sudden/excess stress An acute illness Drug-induced hypoglycemia continues to be one of the most common diabetic shock causes. For those who medicate with insulin, it’s important to know how much your body needs. If you take insulin before meal-time but skip a meal, or decide to have just a salad, your blood sugar could plummet. This condition, also called insulin shock, can also occur if you take an overdose of insulin. But, that’s just one cause of extreme hypoglycemia. If you exercise too much or out of routine after taking your diabetes medication, it could push your blood sugar to an extreme low too. What Are The Warning Signs? Bear in mind that the symptoms of hypoglycemic shock may seem mild at first. But, they should not be ignored. If it isn’t treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that could result in losing consciousness. Thus, one would require immediate medical attention. In worst cases, it can lead to diabetic coma and death. Some hypoglycemic shock symptoms: Sweating Shakiness Dizziness Rapid heart rate Extreme hunger Irritab Continue reading >>

Talk:diabetic Coma

Talk:diabetic Coma

Links from this article with broken #section links : [[diabetes mellitus#complications|acute complications]] You can remove this template after fixing the problems | FAQ | Report a problem Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Diabetic coma. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine [hide](Rated Start-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale. Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale. Moved in from Talk: Diabetes Shock It's fair to point out that the origindkkal author of this piece wanted it spelt CHOCK - please see (slightly edited) text below from AntonioMartin who said (inter alia): I have to tell you that the word chock needs to be changed back on the title from shock to chock. ( ... ) how doctors like spelling the word that describes a sugar reaction. ( ... ) doctors have told me that the word Shock means something different to them, like the shock from seeing something big happen, I guess. Having s Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar