diabetestalk.net

How Do You Use A Glucose Meter?

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Results

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Results

Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team to decide which treatment is best for you. This can help towards reducing your risk of diabetes complications. ••••• There are 2 main ways your glucose level can be measured: The HbA1c blood test measures the amount of glucose that has stuck to a part of the red blood cells and is being carried around the body. This test is usually done on a sample of blood taken from a vein in your arm and the result shows your overall control of glucose levels over the last 2-3 months. You will have this test at least once per year. HbA1c targets are a guide and for most adults with diabetes the expected HbA1c target is 48 - 58mmol/mol. This is the target your health team will strive for since evidence shows that this success can reduce the risk of developing complications from diabetes. However, your target should be set after you have discussed this with your doctor or nurse to see what is right for you. If you have a glucose meter and test strips you will be able to self-test your glucose level. The result will be your current glucose level. If you are self-testing it is important you know what your target blood glucose levels are and what your glucose results mean. Your diabetes doctor or nurse will discuss your glucose levels with you and you can agree on your goals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range for glucose levels due to the fact that each person with diabetes is an individual with different needs and responses to therapy. This is why it is important to consider your needs before setting glucose targets and goals. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide for adults with diabetes. – 3.5–5.5m Continue reading >>

All-in-one Smart Glucose Meter

All-in-one Smart Glucose Meter

The Dario All-In-One Smart Glucose Meter is specially designed to fit your lifestyle in the digital age. This sleek, complete glucose monitoring solution includes a simple-to-use glucose meter, a disposable test strip cartridge holding 25 test strips, and lancing device – and easily fits in your pocket. Using the technology and mobility of your smartphone, the Dario connects to your mobile device and automatically logs your blood glucose measurements, sharing your results with caregivers and doctors – no matter where you are on the globe. Why You’ll Love the Dario Smart Glucose Meter Connects directly to your Smartphone – no need for extra cables or adapters Rapid results – receive your blood glucose reading within 6 seconds Accurate – Dario accuracy meets ISO standards with only a small blood sample Pocket-Size Meter – easily fits into your purse or pocket, no need for a bulky pouch or case Battery free – the power comes from the SmartPhone. No need to carry extra batteries for your glucose meter Strip Cartridge Each strips cartridge holds 25 disposable strips. Reloading your strips is simple, just pull out the old cartridge and insert a new one. Glucose Meter The simple-to-use Dario Smart Glucose Meter automatically tracks your blood sugars with a tiny meter that plugs into your phone’s audio jack. Blood glucose readings are directly tracked, charted, and analyzed for you. Lancing Device The Dario All-In-One Smart Glucose Meter contains a lancing device for convenient blood glucose testing. Simply place your finger on the lancet end of the Dario, pull down on the lancet slider, and push the release button to use. Smart Mobile Device Integration The Dario Smart Glucose Meter is cleared for use with a variety of mobile devices. The glucose meter pops o Continue reading >>

9.2 Glucometer Use

9.2 Glucometer Use

People with diabetes require regular monitoring of their blood glucose to help them achieve as close to normal blood glucose levels as possible for as much of the time as possible. The benefits of maintaining a blood glucose level that is consistently within the range of 4-7 mmol/L will reduce the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia as well as the occurrence rate and severity of the long-term complications of hyperglycemia. Patients in the hospital setting are likely to have inconsistent blood glucose levels as they are affected by changes in diet and lifestyle, surgical procedures, and the stress of being in a hospital. The physician will prescribe how regularly the blood glucose should be monitored. In acute situations, a sliding-scale treatment for insulin will be individually prescribed per patient. The medication administration record (MAR) or sliding scale will provide directions for the amount of medication to be given based on the blood glucose reading. It is usually the responsibility of the nurse to perform blood glucose readings. As with any clinical procedure, ensure that you understand the patient’s condition, the reason for the test, and the possible outcomes of the procedure. Prior to performing a blood glucose test, ensure that you have read and understood the manufacturer’s instructions and your agency’s policy for the blood glucose monitoring machines (see Figure 9.1) used in your clinical setting, as these vary. It is also important that you determine the patient’s understanding of the procedure and the purpose for monitoring blood glucose level. Before you begin, you should also determine if there are any conditions present that could affect the reading. For example, is the patient fasting? Has the patient j Continue reading >>

How Do Glucometers Work?

How Do Glucometers Work?

Through a pinprick several times a day — but what if diabetics could tell their blood-sugar levels anytime, by glancing at a tattoo?… Monitoring blood sugar levels is a pain for the diabetic — both figuratively and literally. Several times a day, they prick a finger to obtain a blood droplet and apply it to a plastic strip that’s inserted in a glucometer — a hand-held device that tells them if their glucose level is high, low, or right on target. It’s usually the job of the pancreas to keep track of sugar levels and to secrete glucagon and insulin to keep them at 100 or so milligrams per deciliter of blood. But for diabetics — either because their pancreas doesn’t function properly or because their body can’t process the hormones it secretes — glucose testing is a do-it-yourself proposition. And a crucial one. Blood-sugar checks show if it’s time to inject a few units of insulin — or grab a lifesaving snack. That’s where the glucometer comes in. “Current glucometers use test strips containing glucose oxidase, an enzyme that reacts to glucose in the blood droplet, and an interface to an electrode inside the meter,” explains Michael Strano, the Charles and Hilda Roddey Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT. “When the strip is inserted into the meter, the flux of the glucose reaction generates an electrical signal,” he says. “The glucometer is calibrated so the number appearing in its digital readout corresponds to the strength of the electrical current: The more glucose in the sample, the higher the number.” Periodic tests via glucometer play an important part in the diabetic’s treatment plan, but current models fall short in giving a true picture of glucose fluctuations in real time. “The complications of diabetes st Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your handsusing warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spotdon't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. 1Joslin Diabetes Center. Tips for more pain-free blood glucose monitoring. Available at: . Accessed March 11, 2016. 2Talk with your healthcare professional before deciding if alternate site testing is right for you. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

How To Use A Glucometer

How To Use A Glucometer

Expert Reviewed Three Methods:Preparing for Daily TestingTesting Blood Sugar with a GlucometerKeeping Track of Your ReadingsCommunity Q&A One of the most valuable tools that a diabetic can have is an at-home blood sugar reader, otherwise known as a glucometer. This hand-held machine allows diabetics to monitor the amount of glucose in the blood, which helps in determining what food you can eat and how well any medication you are on is working, as well as how much insulin you may need to inject.[1] Obtaining and properly using a glucometer at home can make diabetic care simpler and can help you to keep track of your blood sugars over time. 1 Obtain a glucometer and test strips. You can go to any drugstore and buy a blood sugar testing kit. Most kits contain lancets (testing needles), a lancing device, testing strips, and a meter to read the results. Many insurance companies will pay for your meter and test strips if you obtain a prescription from your doctor. 2 Familiarize yourself with all the functions of your blood glucose meter, how much blood is required for testing, where you insert your test strip, and where the readout will be. Look at the pictures and read the instructions thoroughly, and if you have any questions or concerns then contact your doctor before trying to use the machine. 3 Test the glucometer before using it. Most glucometers include a way to test to make sure they are reading correctly. This could be in the form of a premade test strip or a liquid you place on a test strip. These are inserted into the machine and the reading should be within acceptable limits, which the instruction manual will provide. Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

How To Use A Glucose Meter

How To Use A Glucose Meter

A glucose meter is a device you use at home to measure the level of glucose in your blood ​Blood glucose monitoring is an important part of your diabetes care, especially if you are taking insulin. ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​ ​Follow These Steps ​ Prepare these items: glucose meter test strip lancet device needle (lancet) alcohol swab dry swab puncture-proof plastic container with a screw-on cap (e.g. shampoo container) Check to make sure: the insulin and test strips have not passed their expiry dates you are using the correct type of batteries the box of test strips comes with a code key the code key number is the same as that on the box of test strips ​ Calibrate the glucose meter: Insert the code key into the test strip slot. Check that the number appearing on the screen is the same as that on the box of test strips. You must calibrate the glucose meter each time you open a new box of test strips. Wash your hands with soap and water: Prepare the lancet device: Replace the lancet cover carefully. Adjust the depth of your lancet device according to your skin thickness. Prime the lancet device by pressing the release button (for some products, you need to pull and release the lever). Prepare the glucose meter: Remove test strip from the foil or from the test strip container. Insert it into the test strip slot and this will automatically turn the meter on. ​ Test your blood glucose level: Wipe one finger (index, middle or ring) with an alcohol swap and let it dry. Press the lancet device firmly against the side of your finger. Push button to release the needle. Squeeze your finger to get a drop of blood. Wait for the result to show on the screen. This is your blood glucose level. Put away items safely: Remove the lancet cover. Recap the needle before r Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Blood glucose meters are small, computerized devices that measure and display your blood glucose level. These devices are mainly used by people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose level provides you and your doctors with valuable information about how food, exercise, medications, stress, and other factors affect your blood glucose. This information will help you and your doctor construct a treatment plan tailored to your needs. Many types of blood glucose meters are available for at-home use, from basic models that only read blood glucose levels, to more advanced versions that offer features such as memory for storing information. The cost of blood glucose meters and testing supplies varies, and insurance may not always provide coverage. Study all options before picking out a meter, and if you have insurance, check which meter your insurance covers. Consider up-front costs, such as how much the actual meter costs, and long-term costs, such as how expensive testing strips and other supplies are. Then, work with your doctor and learn how to properly use your meter. Whether this is your first blood glucose meter or you’ve used one for several years and are looking for an upgrade, there are several questions you should ask yourself before you begin looking: Does your doctor or nurse suggest a specific meter? These people have a wealth of experience with an array of meters and can guide you in a good direction. What does your insurance cover? Your insurance company may have a list of preapproved meters it covers. Also, make sure to find out if and how your insurance will cover the cost of testing strips and supplies. How much will this meter cost you? Some meters can be costly and insurance companies don’t always make allowances for pricier Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

The process of monitoring one's own blood glucose with a glucose meter is often referred to as self-monitoring of blood glucose or "SMBG." To test for glucose with a typical glucose meter, place a small sample of blood on a disposable "test strip" and place the strip in the meter. The test strips are coated with chemicals (glucose oxidase, dehydrogenase, or hexokinase) that combine with glucose in blood. The meter measures how much glucose is present. Meters do this in different ways. Some measure the amount of electricity that can pass through the sample. Others measure how much light reflects from it. The meter displays the glucose level as a number. Several new models can record and store a number of test results. Some models can connect to personal computers to store test results or print them out. Choosing a Glucose Meter At least 25 different meters are commercially available. They differ in several ways including: Amount of blood needed for each test Testing speed Overall size Ability to store test results in memory Cost of the meter Cost of the test strips used Newer meters often have features that make them easier to use than older models. Some meters allow you to get blood from places other than your fingertip (alternative site testing). Some new models have automatic timing, error codes and signals, or barcode readers to help with calibration. Some meters have a large display screen or spoken instructions for people with visual impairments. Using Your Glucose Meter Diabetes care should be designed for each individual patient. Some patients may need to test (monitor) more often than others do. How often you use your glucose meter should be based on the recommendation of your health care provider. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recommended for all p Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Diabetes is a lifelong condition. Because it is, you can have major health problems if you don't keep blood glucose under control. That's why fully understanding how to buy and properly use diabetes testing supplies as well as diabetes medications is so important. Learning to regularly test your blood glucose level with a glucose monitor and to take diabetes medications when you are supposed to will make living with the condition much easier. With a little practice, you can self-manage diabetes just as you manage other aspects of your life. When you do, your quality of life and ability to be active and do the things you want to do will greatly improve. Home blood sugar (glucose) testing is an essential part of controlling your blood sugar and self-managing diabetes. Your diabetes educator can guide you in terms of how often to check your blood glucose and how to do it properly. Make sure the diabetes educator watches you use the glucose meter several times. That way, you can be sure you're doing it correctly. At a minimum, you'll be checking your blood sugar every morning before you eat. It's also advisable to check it before lunch and dinner and at bedtime. Your doctor may also ask that you test your blood one hour after eating. Blood glucose levels checked with blood taken from the fingertips will show important changes faster than glucose levels checked with blood taken from other sites on the body. The usual way to check blood sugar levels is by: Pricking the fingertip with a lancing tool -- a small, sharp needle Putting the blood drop on a test strip Placing the test strip into a glucose meter Reading the blood glucose level displayed on the meter If you take insulin, you might change the dose, depending on the reading. Checking blood glucose frequently allows you Continue reading >>

Accuracy Of Glucose Meter Use In Gestational Diabetes.

Accuracy Of Glucose Meter Use In Gestational Diabetes.

Abstract Glucose monitoring is essential for the successful management of gestational diabetes. The accuracy of glucose meters is typically determined over a much wider range of glucose values than that commonly encountered in gestational diabetes. The objective of our study was to look at the accuracy of self-monitoring glucose meters in a clinic setting over a range of glucose values seen in gestational diabetes. We retrospectively analyzed 107 case records of subjects with gestational diabetes, each of whom had three simultaneous laboratory and glucose meter glucose tests. The results were compared using the performance goals that (1) all of glucose meters should have readings within 10% of the reference value and (2) the error grid analysis in the standard format and a modified version suitable for gestational diabetes. We also examined the range of the differences from the reference value. Nearly half of the values (47%) were in excess of 10% of the reference range (either above or below). Close to 15% were in excess of 20% difference from the reference range. Standard error grid analysis showed that 96% of the values fell within sections A of the error grid which are considered acceptable, and 100% fell within sections A and B, differences which are generally considered to have no major impact on care. The modified version of the error grid analysis demonstrated that 39% of the values were outside the acceptable range. Within subjects, a substantial number (26%) had a range of differences that exceeded 20% difference between each other. Although the meters give reasonable results that might be acceptable for general diabetes care, the results provide some cause for concern in the management of gestational diabetes. Given the need for precision in the setting of pr Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar