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How Do You Lower Your Blood Sugar?

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

How To Lower Sugar Levels In The Blood Immediately

How To Lower Sugar Levels In The Blood Immediately

High blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia, is a condition in which glucose concentrations in the blood are too high. This condition is commonly found in individuals who have diabetes and is caused when the body does not produce enough of or is resistant to the effects of the hormone insulin. When high blood sugar is left untreated, it can lead to organ and tissue damage, coma and death. Monitoring your blood sugar levels is a good way to address high sugar immediately and there are several ways to lower sugar levels in the blood. Video of the Day Engage in exercise. According to the American Diabetes Association, exercise can help lower your blood sugar level by using the excess sugar as fuel. If, however, your blood sugar level is over 240 mg/dL, use a urine test strip to check your urine for the presence of ketones. When ketones are being produced by the body, exercise can cause your blood sugar levels to rise, rather than decrease. Physical activity can have immediate benefit in lowering blood sugar and also long-term benefit by helping to stabilize blood sugar levels. Eat 15 g less carbohydrates at your next meal. While skipping meals is not a healthy option for individuals with high blood sugar, decreasing the number of carbohydrates consumed at the next meal can help force your body to use the excess sugar. Check your blood sugar an hour after the meal and if your sugar level has decreased but is still high, decrease the next meal by 30 g of carbohydrates. Choose foods that are less likely to cause an additional sudden rise in blood sugar. These foods can be identified by determining their glycemic index value (see Resources). Look for foods with a low glycemic index value, such as beans and legumes, and avoid high glycemic foods, such as white potatoes. Don't ass Continue reading >>

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic. But did you know that it’s not just preventable but also reversible? If you have Diabetes Type 2, we have for you a bunch of helpful tips on how to bring down blood sugar. While some of us are genetically at a risk of diabetes Type 2, it is largely a lifestyle disorder today. By changing your lifestyle, you can learn how to lower blood sugar levels naturally — without the need for medication. Most diabetes medications are nothing more than a temporary-fix. They don’t address the underlying reason behind high blood sugar, which is driven by the environment. Diet and lifestyle changes can reverse diabetes, unlike medications which only treat the symptoms. The key: Make a positive change to the way you eat, sleep, stay active, and manage stress. So, let’s learn how to bring down blood sugar through 15 easy, natural ways. How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally: 17 Actionable Tips 1. Cut Back On Carbohydrates A diet high in processed carbs adds to the sugar load in your diet. This is because all carbs get broken down into sugars upon digestion. This leads to increased blood sugar and weight gain. Avoid all carbs with a high glycemic index. We recommend a Low Carb-High Fat or LCHF diet to reverse diabetes. Ideally, only 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from carbs. The right carbs for any diabetic are fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and millets are some whole grains that work. 2. You Need More Of The Good Fats Afraid how will you survive when cutting back on the belly-filling carbs? This is where the good fats step in. Healthy fats that provide Omega 3 fatty acids are your friends. Not only will they keep you full for longer, they will also improve your heart health Continue reading >>

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

A second study in a 2013 edition of the journal Obesity analyzed the impact of weight loss among obese subjects with metabolic abnormalities. Results showed that those who lost 5 percent of their body weight experienced significant improvements in fasting blood sugar levels compared to those who did not lose weight. Lower your own blood sugar levels by committing to a weight loss plan. By reducing your calorie intake and adding regular exercise to your routine, you can drop enough weight to protect yourself from diabetes. Cut out Sugary Drinks Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, iced tea, and sports drinks, can increase your risk of diabetes. Those who drink one to two sugar sweetened beverages per day are 26 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those who consume less than one such beverage per month, according to a 2010 study in Diabetes Care. In addition, a 2013 study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those who increased their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during a six-year period were 1.6 times more likely to develop elevated fasting blood sugar levels. Reducing your intake of these sugary beverages can lower your risk of diabetes. According to a 2013 study in the journal PLoS ONE, a 10-20 percent reduction in the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages would reduce new cases of diabetes. Specifically, replacing sugary beverages with water can have a beneficial impact on your health. A 2007 study in Obesity found that those who replaced sugary beverages with water cut their daily energy intake by 200 calories. This reduction could help with weight loss and therefore reduce your diabetes risk. Increase Your Fiber Intake Adding fiber to your diet can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. A 2014 study in the European Journal of Epidemiolo Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Level

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Level

How to Lower Your Blood Sugar Level. If your blood sugar level is too high, it's vital for your health that you lower your level right away. High blood sugar levels increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, diabetes and vision and nerve problems. Learn how to take care of your body so you'll enjoy good health. Exercise will lower your blood sugar levels. Make time in your schedule for a regular exercise routine, even if it is just walking. Walk downhill if you are too heavy or weak to start a regular exercise program, you'll still benefit by reducing your blood sugar level. Eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of water. Spread your meals throughout the day. It is better to eat five small meals then three big ones. Add cinnamon to your diet each day to help lower your blood sugar level. Take your medications, if you are on any, at the same time each day. Avoid soft drinks and foods that are high in sugar and carbohydrates. Be aware of the effects that over-the-counter medications have on your blood sugar levels. Take the time to learn about the reasons that you have high blood sugar levels, and become educated on all the ways to lower those levels. Stressful situations can cause your blood sugar levels to rise. A recent study states that cherries may reduce blood sugar levels. If you are going to have an alcoholic drink, choose one that is lower in sugar. If you are having a mixed drink, use sugar-free mixers. Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Over the past decade and a half thousands of people with Type 2 diabetes have dramatically lowered their blood sugar using this very simple technique which was first published on the alt.support.diabetes newsgroup. Unlike most other strategies you may have encountered, this one does not tell you what to eat. Instead it teaches you how the meals you are currently eating affect your blood sugar and then guides you through the process of adapting those meals so that they will be more blood sugar friendly. Try it for a week and you'll see how well it works. Step 1: Eat whatever you've been eating and write it all down Eat normally, but use your blood sugar meter to test yourself at the following times. Write down what you ate and what your blood sugar results were: Upon waking (fasting) 1 hour after each meal 2 hours after each meal Note: People often ask where to start measuring the hour after eating. For most people measuring from the end of the meal works well. If you take more than 45 minutes to eat your meal, measure from when you eat the course that contains the most starch and sugar. What this will tell you is when your blood sugar is at its highest after your meal and how long it takes to drop back down. Most people also will see that all starches and sugars, even the ones that nutritionists tell us are "healthy" like whole grains and fruits can raise our blood sugars dramatically compared to fats and proteins. Step 2: For the next few days cut back on your carbohydrates Cut back on breads, cereals, rice, beans, any wheat products, potato, corn, and fruit. If you are eating gluten-free foods, stop eating anything designed to replace wheat-based foods, too.Get most of your carbohydrates from veggies. Test your modified meals using the same schedule above. See what im Continue reading >>

Tips To Lower Blood Sugar

Tips To Lower Blood Sugar

Stick to a Healthful Meal Plan Following a healthful meal plan is one of the most important measures you can take to keep your blood glucose under control. In years past, people with diabetes were expected to follow a strict diet that had little regard for individual likes or dislikes. Today, diabetes experts realize that a one-size-fits-all approach doesn't work and isn't necessary. Work with your dietitian to design a meal plan that reflects your own needs and preferences. Your plan should: Be nutritionally balanced to include carbohydrates, protein, and fat, as well as vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Reduce the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol you eat. Minimize the amount of salt and sodium you eat. Help you maintain or achieve an ideal weight. Include foods that you enjoy. Don't Skip Meals Don't Skip Meals Breakfast is especially important if you need to control your weight. It helps to jump-start your metabolism and makes you less likely to overeat later. If you do skip a meal, eat a nutrition bar or other healthful snack to replace the missing carbohydrates. Adjust your medication as advised by your health-care provider. Don't Delay Meals Everyone needs to eat about every four to six hours during the day to keep energy levels up. People with diabetes usually have better blood glucose control if their meals and carbohydrates are spaced evenly throughout the day. Too many carbohydrates at any one time can raise your blood glucose too high even if you take diabetes medicine. If you do postpone a meal, snack on a food that contains carbohydrates or delay taking your medication as suggested by your health-care provider. {C} Count Carbs "The purpose of carb counting is to more consistently control the amount of glucose Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Make these simple lifestyle tweaks to feel great all day. Whether you have diabetes or prediabetes—or just generally suffer ill effects from crazy blood sugar swings—you want to know what really works to control your sugar levels. It can make all the difference in living well and staying off the blood sugar roller coaster that can drag down your mood and energy and skew your hunger levels. Here are a dozen tips that will help your blood sugar and your overall health. (If you have diabetes, remember you should always work with your health care team first.) Being naturally thin is not license to stay on your butt. Even for adults at a healthy weight, those who classify as couch potatoes have higher blood sugar than those who are more active, according to a 2017 study from the University of Florida. That can put you at risk for prediabetes, even if you have a normal BMI. Take the stairs, head to the grocery store on foot (if possible), keep that promise to your dog to take him on a walk, and go for that weekend bike ride. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. In your effort to eat more quinoa, you might have forgotten about an oldie-but-goodie carb: barley. This whole grain is packed with fiber that tamps down your appetite and can help decrease blood sugar, according to a Swedish study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. Why? Your gut bacteria interacts with barley, which may in turn help your body metabolize glucose (sugar). Besides, 1 cup contains 6 grams of fiber, which helps to mute blood sugar spikes. Don't be afraid to toss it in soups, on a roasted veggie salad, or have it as a side to fish or chicken. Exercise is a great way to boost your body's ability to manage blood sugar, but making sure it's a heart-pumping workout will help e Continue reading >>

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes is a growing problem that can't be ignored. Currently, 1 in 10 Americans have type 2 diabetes. However, if new cases develop as projected, its prevalence could double or even triple over the next 40 years, according to Ann Albright, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC. The rates are predicted to skyrocket by the year 2050. By that time, 1 in every 3 Americans will be diabetic unless we make drastic cultural changes. Diabetes affects approximately 29.1 million people of all ages in America, or about 9.3 percent of the population. Add to that about 86 million people in the United States with pre-diabetes, which is a stage of insulin resistance that develops before full-blown diabetes. If there’s no intervention, those with pre-diabetes will have diabetes in three to six years. What is Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. When the body can't produce insulin, this is type 1 diabetes. Some new evidence from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the DIABIMMUNE Study Group suggests that type 1 diabetes may be related to changes in the body’s microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on the body, especially in the digestive tract. Type 1 diabetes is not caused by poor diet or lifestyle factors. Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by a poor diet and lack of exercise, which lead to insulin resistance, the cells’ inability to recognize the availability of insulin that they can use for energy. An unhealthy lifestyle may also create an environment in which the pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. Many type 2 diabetics have both insulin r Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

I may receive a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. Full disclosure here. If you are an American age 40 to 70, the odds are about 40 percent that you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes. (source) That means nearly HALF of us aged 40-70 have blood sugar regulation issues, likely from consuming too much sugar and too many refined carbs. Has your doctor told you to monitor your blood sugar levels? Is your fasting glucose above 95 mg/dL? Most of us are aware that uncontrolled high blood sugar leads to type 2 diabetes, but it also contributes to weight gain, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, increased oxidation (read: accelerated aging), inflammation, and high blood pressure. ALL of these conditions are preventable via diet and lifestyle changes. Even if you have a family history of diabetes, you are not a slave to your genes. You can lower your blood sugar naturally to prevent disease and look and feel better. What is High Blood Sugar? Also called hyperglycemia or high blood glucose, high blood sugar means there is too much glucose circulating in your bloodstream because your cells have shut the door and will not receive any more glucose. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar levels damage your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. Fasting high blood sugar is considered higher than 130 mg/dL after 8 hours of fasting, and postprandial (after a meal) high blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dL two hours after you eat. Your blood glucose shouldn’t rise over 140 mg/dL after meals. Normal fasting blood glucose is between 75-95 mg/dL. Although 100 is often considered the cutoff for normal, studies have shown that fasting blood sugar levels in the mid-90s were predictive of future diabetes a decade later. Ideal fasting blood glucose is 85 mg/dL. Continue reading >>

Life's Simple 7® | Reduce Blood Sugar

Life's Simple 7® | Reduce Blood Sugar

You can lower diabetes and heart disease risks by controlling blood sugar. Heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 causes of death and disability among people with type 2 diabetes. Blood glucose, or sugar, is an important fuel for your body. When it’s at the recommended level that’s normal, but when it’s too high that can lead to diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is important for controlling blood glucose levels. But if your glucose levels become too high or too low, your body can have trouble producing a hormone called insulin that it needs to stay healthy. When your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or it doesn’t efficiently use the insulin it makes, your blood sugar may become too high. When this happens, your body’s cells cannot use the sugar in your blood and the cells can be starved for energy. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. That’s why managing your blood sugar level is one of what the American Heart Association calls Life’s Simple 7® — key health factors and behaviors that keep your heart healthy, lower your risk of heart disease and stroke, and improve your quality of life. Learn About Diabetes Knowing your blood sugar numbers is the first step to managing your blood glucose, and your best chance at preventing diabetes, said Robert H. Eckel, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and a past president of the American Heart Association. If you're at least 45 years old, you should get tested for diabetes, and then you should be tested again every 3 years. If you're 45 or older and overweight you may want to get tested more often.. Other risk factors include a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes or delivering a baby over 9 poun Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Control Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes: Control Your Blood Sugar

Controlling your blood sugar is important in managing your diabetes. You can take steps that can help you make changes to reach your blood sugar control numbers. Getting control starts when you begin to watch your weight and take your medicines as prescribed, but there are other things you can do that will help too. These may include: Staying active and exercising Making a personalized meal plan with your nutritionist or doctor Checking your blood sugar at regular intervals and writing down the results Knowing what to do when your blood sugar is too high or too low If you have diabetes, you can take steps to help control your blood sugar. Start by making small changes to help you reach your goal numbers. 1. Watch your weight Lose weight slowly if you are overweight or obese. Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider about a weight goal that’s right for you 2. Take your medicines 3. Be active Stay active as recommended by your physician. For example, incorporating 30-minutes of physical activity into your daily routine about five times a week. 4. Make a meal plan that works Work with your doctor or a dietitian to come up with a meal plan that helps keep your blood sugar under control 5. Check your blood sugar Continue reading >>

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