diabetestalk.net

How Do You Lower Your Blood Sugar?

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar Naturally

Processed foods like cookies, cakes, and candy (and even starchy plant foods like rice, beans, and potatoes) can cause rapid increases in blood sugar levels. After one meal containing these foods, blood sugar can get so high that insulin can’t keep up. Side effects like fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, trouble concentrating, and frequent urination can result. If you consume high-carbohydrate foods every day, you increase your risk of type 2 diabetes — the medical diagnosis for having chronically high blood sugar levels that are caused by diet and lifestyle. (This is different from type 1 diabetes — a condition where the body produces little to no insulin.) Over 422 million people have diabetes worldwide, and their high blood sugar levels are destroying their bodies. To know if your blood sugar levels are chronically high, many doctors will check your A1C levels. A1C stands for glycated hemoglobin, which is formed when blood sugar attaches to hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). A1C tests measure the percentage of your hemoglobin that has blood sugar attached to it. If blood sugar levels have been high for the past 3 months, then more hemoglobin will be glycated. Thus, A1C testing provides an accurate measurement of how high your blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates pre-diabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. Earlier in this article, we explored how you can raise your blood sugar. Just eat cookies, cakes, rice, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods, and you will be on the fast track toward diabetes. Following this logic, won’t eating fewer carbohydrates lower your blood sug Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Life with type 2 diabetes can sometimes seem like an hourly or even minute-by-minute effort to stabilize your blood sugar. All of the recommendations and drugs you’ve been given as part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan are intended to help you reach — and keep — healthy blood sugar levels most of the time. But doctors are learning that to control type 2 diabetes well, better information about why blood sugar matters and how to manage it is essential. The Facts About Diabetes and Blood Sugar As the American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains, your body needs sugar (glucose) for fuel, and there’s a fairly complicated process that makes it possible for your body to use that sugar. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is the hormone that enables the cells in your body to take advantage of sugar. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body isn’t able to remove sugar from your blood. This can happen if your body stops being sensitive to insulin or if it starts to respond in a delayed or exaggerated way to changes in your blood sugar. Diabetes is signaled by an elevated blood sugar level of more than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for a fasting blood test, or more than 200 mg/dL at any time during the day. It can also be indicated by a hemoglobin A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher, a measure of the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin in the blood during the past two to three months. (Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. So an A1C of 6.5 means that 6.5 percent of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them.) Unchecked high blood sugar gradually damages the blood vessels in your body. Over the long term, this slow, progressive harm can lead to a dangerous loss of sensation in your legs and fe Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

​This article is written for type 2 diabetics who need help coming down from a very high blood sugar during a single, isolated high blood sugar event. If you want to try an stabilize your baseline, consider signing up for my Baseline Blood Sugar Challenge course. ​THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL MEDICAL ADVICE. If you're a type 2 diabetic and your blood sugar is high right now (greater than 300mg/dL for at least 6 hours), the first thing you should do is call your doctor. So, if you haven't called anyone for help yet, please stop reading this article and call your doctor. If your doctor is able to help, then you need not read on. Also, if you are having symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, stop reading this article and go to the hospital immediately. Diabetic Ketoacidosis can kill you if left untreated. But. If you're in a situation where your blood sugar has been high for an extended period of time, you could perhaps consider taking the following steps to solve your blood sugar problem. Disclaimer: This is friendly, non-medical advice from a random diabetic person you don't even know, which is a very (very) poor substitute for real, actual medical advice. Use at your own risk. First, you should try and lower your blood sugar without injectable insulin by completing the following steps: 1. Check your blood sugar. Write down the time and your blood sugar level. 2. Drink water (this doesn't actually lower blood sugar, but it helps flush sugar and ketones from your body, if you have them). Continue drinking water, but please don't make yourself sick. 3. Move. As in, walk. Walk around the block or walk in place or haul your ass up and down the stairs for 30-60 minutes. Walking helps your cells become less insulin resistant, which is what you need right now. Do N Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

Tips To Lower Blood Sugar

Tips To Lower Blood Sugar

Stick to a Healthful Meal Plan Following a healthful meal plan is one of the most important measures you can take to keep your blood glucose under control. In years past, people with diabetes were expected to follow a strict diet that had little regard for individual likes or dislikes. Today, diabetes experts realize that a one-size-fits-all approach doesn't work and isn't necessary. Work with your dietitian to design a meal plan that reflects your own needs and preferences. Your plan should: Be nutritionally balanced to include carbohydrates, protein, and fat, as well as vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Reduce the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol you eat. Minimize the amount of salt and sodium you eat. Help you maintain or achieve an ideal weight. Include foods that you enjoy. Don't Skip Meals Don't Skip Meals Breakfast is especially important if you need to control your weight. It helps to jump-start your metabolism and makes you less likely to overeat later. If you do skip a meal, eat a nutrition bar or other healthful snack to replace the missing carbohydrates. Adjust your medication as advised by your health-care provider. Don't Delay Meals Everyone needs to eat about every four to six hours during the day to keep energy levels up. People with diabetes usually have better blood glucose control if their meals and carbohydrates are spaced evenly throughout the day. Too many carbohydrates at any one time can raise your blood glucose too high even if you take diabetes medicine. If you do postpone a meal, snack on a food that contains carbohydrates or delay taking your medication as suggested by your health-care provider. {C} Count Carbs "The purpose of carb counting is to more consistently control the amount of glucose Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Over the past decade and a half thousands of people with Type 2 diabetes have dramatically lowered their blood sugar using this very simple technique which was first published on the alt.support.diabetes newsgroup. Unlike most other strategies you may have encountered, this one does not tell you what to eat. Instead it teaches you how the meals you are currently eating affect your blood sugar and then guides you through the process of adapting those meals so that they will be more blood sugar friendly. Try it for a week and you'll see how well it works. Step 1: Eat whatever you've been eating and write it all down Eat normally, but use your blood sugar meter to test yourself at the following times. Write down what you ate and what your blood sugar results were: Upon waking (fasting) 1 hour after each meal 2 hours after each meal Note: People often ask where to start measuring the hour after eating. For most people measuring from the end of the meal works well. If you take more than 45 minutes to eat your meal, measure from when you eat the course that contains the most starch and sugar. What this will tell you is when your blood sugar is at its highest after your meal and how long it takes to drop back down. Most people also will see that all starches and sugars, even the ones that nutritionists tell us are "healthy" like whole grains and fruits can raise our blood sugars dramatically compared to fats and proteins. Step 2: For the next few days cut back on your carbohydrates Cut back on breads, cereals, rice, beans, any wheat products, potato, corn, and fruit. If you are eating gluten-free foods, stop eating anything designed to replace wheat-based foods, too.Get most of your carbohydrates from veggies. Test your modified meals using the same schedule above. See what im Continue reading >>

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic. But did you know that it’s not just preventable but also reversible? If you have Diabetes Type 2, we have for you a bunch of helpful tips on how to bring down blood sugar. While some of us are genetically at a risk of diabetes Type 2, it is largely a lifestyle disorder today. By changing your lifestyle, you can learn how to lower blood sugar levels naturally — without the need for medication. Most diabetes medications are nothing more than a temporary-fix. They don’t address the underlying reason behind high blood sugar, which is driven by the environment. Diet and lifestyle changes can reverse diabetes, unlike medications which only treat the symptoms. The key: Make a positive change to the way you eat, sleep, stay active, and manage stress. So, let’s learn how to bring down blood sugar through 15 easy, natural ways. How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally: 17 Actionable Tips 1. Cut Back On Carbohydrates A diet high in processed carbs adds to the sugar load in your diet. This is because all carbs get broken down into sugars upon digestion. This leads to increased blood sugar and weight gain. Avoid all carbs with a high glycemic index. We recommend a Low Carb-High Fat or LCHF diet to reverse diabetes. Ideally, only 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from carbs. The right carbs for any diabetic are fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and millets are some whole grains that work. 2. You Need More Of The Good Fats Afraid how will you survive when cutting back on the belly-filling carbs? This is where the good fats step in. Healthy fats that provide Omega 3 fatty acids are your friends. Not only will they keep you full for longer, they will also improve your heart health Continue reading >>

Life's Simple 7® | Reduce Blood Sugar

Life's Simple 7® | Reduce Blood Sugar

You can lower diabetes and heart disease risks by controlling blood sugar. Heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 causes of death and disability among people with type 2 diabetes. Blood glucose, or sugar, is an important fuel for your body. When it’s at the recommended level that’s normal, but when it’s too high that can lead to diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is important for controlling blood glucose levels. But if your glucose levels become too high or too low, your body can have trouble producing a hormone called insulin that it needs to stay healthy. When your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or it doesn’t efficiently use the insulin it makes, your blood sugar may become too high. When this happens, your body’s cells cannot use the sugar in your blood and the cells can be starved for energy. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. That’s why managing your blood sugar level is one of what the American Heart Association calls Life’s Simple 7® — key health factors and behaviors that keep your heart healthy, lower your risk of heart disease and stroke, and improve your quality of life. Learn About Diabetes Knowing your blood sugar numbers is the first step to managing your blood glucose, and your best chance at preventing diabetes, said Robert H. Eckel, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and a past president of the American Heart Association. If you're at least 45 years old, you should get tested for diabetes, and then you should be tested again every 3 years. If you're 45 or older and overweight you may want to get tested more often.. Other risk factors include a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes or delivering a baby over 9 poun Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes 101: Why You Need To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes is a growing problem that can't be ignored. Currently, 1 in 10 Americans have type 2 diabetes. However, if new cases develop as projected, its prevalence could double or even triple over the next 40 years, according to Ann Albright, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC. The rates are predicted to skyrocket by the year 2050. By that time, 1 in every 3 Americans will be diabetic unless we make drastic cultural changes. Diabetes affects approximately 29.1 million people of all ages in America, or about 9.3 percent of the population. Add to that about 86 million people in the United States with pre-diabetes, which is a stage of insulin resistance that develops before full-blown diabetes. If there’s no intervention, those with pre-diabetes will have diabetes in three to six years. What is Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. When the body can't produce insulin, this is type 1 diabetes. Some new evidence from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the DIABIMMUNE Study Group suggests that type 1 diabetes may be related to changes in the body’s microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on the body, especially in the digestive tract. Type 1 diabetes is not caused by poor diet or lifestyle factors. Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by a poor diet and lack of exercise, which lead to insulin resistance, the cells’ inability to recognize the availability of insulin that they can use for energy. An unhealthy lifestyle may also create an environment in which the pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. Many type 2 diabetics have both insulin r Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar