diabetestalk.net

How Do Triglycerides Affect Blood Sugar?

Don't Be Afraid Of Fruit

Don't Be Afraid Of Fruit

Don't Be Afraid of Fruit by Berkeley Wellness | July 01, 2011 Eat more fruits and vegetables—who could argue with that simple advice? Well, amazingly enough, the fruit part is being questioned, mostly by advocates of low-carb diets, such as science writer Gary Taubes and lifestyle guru Tim Ferriss. Some warn that fruit is almost as “evil” as sugar and white bread when it comes to weight control and overall health. Fruit: guilt by association What scares some people about fruit is that not only do nearly all of its calories come from carbs, but most of those carbs are sugar, and much of that sugar is fructose. Say fructose and most people think high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)—our No. 1 sweetener, added to so many soft drinks and processed foods. HFCS is slightly more than half fructose; plain old table sugar (sucrose) is also half fructose, while honey is about 40 percent fructose. Some recent research suggests that fructose, at least in the large quantities many Americans are now consuming, can have adverse effects on blood cholesterol and triglycerides, worsen blood sugar control, promote abdominal weight gain and pose other health risks. But fresh fruits supply only a small fraction of the fructose Americans consume. You would have to eat several servings of fruit to get as much fructose as in a can of soda. Moreover, fruits are complicated foods, not just a serving of fructose. Their fiber and other components help slow the absorption of fructose, compared to sugary beverages. Some fruits, such as apples, pears and mangoes, are higher in fructose and other sugars and thus calories, but they’re still only moderate sources. Some are relatively high on the glycemic index (a measure of the effect of carbohydrates on blood sugar), but most are moderate. It’s h Continue reading >>

How Sugar, Not Fat, Raises Your Cholesterol

How Sugar, Not Fat, Raises Your Cholesterol

Excess carbohydrates and sugar lead to cholesterol and weight gain, explains Dr. Doni Wilson, which is why balancing blood sugar levels every day is so important. When you go to the doctor and get a cholesterol reading, you may be cautioned against eating high-fat foods. But very little fat from foods becomes cholesterol in your blood. What produces cholesterol is rather the excessive consumption of carbs at any one time. The cholesterol and triglycerides in your bloodstream come not from consuming excess fat, but rather, from consuming excess glucose. I’m not just talking about excess glucose over the course of a week or even a day. I’m talking about what happens when you consume excess glucose in one sitting. Let’s take a closer look at exactly happens when your body gets too many carbs at one particular meal. First, you digest the carb-containing food, breaking it down into the individual glucose molecules that are small enough to cross the cells of your intestinal walls and enter your bloodstream. Because you have eaten too many carbs, you have far too much glucose stuck in your blood. You don’t have enough insulin to move all that glucose into your cells. So what happens to that excess glucose? Some of it is stored in your liver as a substance known as glycogen, to be released when you don’t eat. Harking back to our hunter-gatherer days, our bodies created a backup system to ensure that even if we can’t get any food for a couple of days, we won’t starve to death. The liver can only hold so much glycogen, however. So what about the glucose that doesn’t fit? Your body has three choices: convert the glucose into body fat, which translates into weight gain, most likely around your middle; convert the glucose into lipids (fats), which remain in your bloo Continue reading >>

10 Causes Of High Triglycerides In Diabetes

10 Causes Of High Triglycerides In Diabetes

It's not surprising to have high triglyceride levels if you have type 2 diabetes. About 80% of people with diabetes struggle with this problem. Elevated triglyceride levels are also a component of metabolic syndrome, a group of disorders that increase your risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Other symptoms of this syndrome include high blood sugar, high blood pressure, low HDL (good cholesterol), and excess belly fat. Definition Triglycerides are fat molecules that make up most of your body fat and the fat found in food. Along with cholesterol, they are one of the lipids that circulate in your blood. The medical term for having elevated levels of triglycerides is hypertriglyceridemia . In fasting laboratory tests, a normal triglyceride level is below 150 mg/dL. Borderline high is 150 to 199 mg/dL. High is considered 200 to 499 mg/dL. Very high is over 500 mg/dL. High triglyceride levels can increase your risk for heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. There is a link between chronically elevated triglyceride levels and atherosclerosis , as well as insulin resistance. Causes of High Triglycerides There are many causes for high triglyceride levels. The list below includes common causes for people who have type 2 diabetes and related problems: Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes: When your diabetes is not under good control, you likely have high levels of both glucose (blood sugar) and insulin in your body. Insulin helps convert glucose into glycogen (the stored form of glucose) and helps to store glycogen in the liver. When the liver becomes too saturated with glycogen, though, glucose is instead used to create fatty acids that are released into the bloodstream. These fatty acids are used to make triglycerides, which build up in fat cells and contribute to Continue reading >>

Hypertriglyceridemia (high Triglycerides)

Hypertriglyceridemia (high Triglycerides)

What Is Hypertriglyceridemia? Hypertriglyceridemia may be described as an excess of triglycerides in the blood. Triglycerides are fatty substances in your blood and body that get their name from their chemical structure. Your liver produces triglycerides. Any extra calories in your diet can be changed into triglycerides. These triglycerides may also be changed into cholesterol. The food that you consume in your diet is either used or stored. When you eat, the fat in your food is digested, and triglycerides are released into your bloodstream. This will give you energy to perform activities, or just to perform any vital functions. The rest will be stored as fat. Although trigylceride levels vary with age, a "normal" level is considered less than 150 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Causes of Hypertriglyceridemia: Age - your triglyceride levels will increase with age. Weight gain- People who are extremely overweight (obese), will have more calories converted into cholesterol and triglycerides. Excess calories from alcohol will also cause your liver to make more triglycerides, which in turn causes less fat to be removed from your blood stream. If you have liver or kidney disease, or metabolic conditions such as hypothyroidism or diabetes, you will be placed at risk for hypertriglyceridemia. Genetics - Increased triglyceride levels in the blood may be associated with certain genetic diseases or disorders, such as familial combined hyperlipidemia. Medications -such as oral contraceptives, and certain steroids, may cause increased triglyceride levels Elevated triglyceride levels may lead to pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas. However, there are some individuals that may never develop pancreatitis with high triglyceride levels, or some may Continue reading >>

Sugar & Triglycerides

Sugar & Triglycerides

High levels of triglycerides in your blood put you at an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease, diabetes and fatty liver disease. In fact, the American Heart Association reports that young people with high triglyceride levels have a four times greater risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke than young people with normal triglyceride levels. What you eat is largely associated with the amount of triglycerides in your blood, and cutting back on sugar is one way to help keep your triglycerides in check. How Sugar Affects Triglycerides Sugar has no nutritional value. All the sweetener does is provide you with extra calories. When you go over your calorie allotment for the day, your body takes these extra calories and converts them into triglycerides, which are stored in your fat tissue for later energy use. However, some of these extra triglycerides end up in your arteries and can cling to your artery walls. This buildup, also referred to as plaque, can harden your artery walls and inhibit blood flow. Eventually, this can lead to serious complications, such as heart attack or stroke. Sugar Recommendations While all individuals should limit sugar intake, it is especially important for those with increased triglyceride levels. Sugar should be limited to no more than 8 percent of your daily calories. If you are on a 2,000-calorie diet, sugar should contribute a maximum of 160 calories to your diet. Because sugar contains 4 calories per gram, this means no more than 40 grams per day. Limit chocolate, hard candies, table sugar, jellies, honey, desserts and sugary cereals. A Note on Beverages According to the American Heart Association, people who consume a large amount of beverages that contain added sugars tend to take in more calories throughout the d Continue reading >>

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

Originally from South Asia, mangoes are now one of the most cultivated fruits in tropical regions. In recent years, the potential health benefits of mangoes have been widely investigated. There are a number of varieties of mango, all of which belong to the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. Globally, India grows the most mangoes, producing more than 18 million tons per year. Mangoes contain a variety of vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, A, E, K, and a range of B vitamins. Other constituents include polyphenols, triterpene, and lupeol, which can benefit our health by providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this article, we will discuss some of the recent findings regarding mangoes and their effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, obesity, and diabetes. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about mangoes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Some evidence suggests that mango consumption can help regulate blood sugar Mangoes contain a range of vitamins, including B vitamins In South Asia, mangoes have been cultivated for thousands of years Mangoes and cholesterol High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. If it builds up, cholesterol can block the arteries, potentially leading to heart disease, stroke, or heart attack. Currently, an estimated 73.5 million Americans have high cholesterol levels. Because of the huge number of people at risk, any simple dietary changes that might help reduce this figure are likely to be investigated. A study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition in 2011, looked at the effect of mangoes on cholesterol levels in mice. The mice were fed a high-fat diet either with or without the addition of freeze-dried mangoes. The team measured the mice's fat content, blood sugar levels, Continue reading >>

How Not To Have High Triglycerides

How Not To Have High Triglycerides

High triglyceride levels are common, as common as muffin tops and man breasts. You will find a triglyceride level among the four values on any standard cholesterol panel. High triglycerides are either ignored by most doctors or reflexively “treated” with drugs, such as fibrates (Lopid, fenofibrate) or prescription fish oil (Lovaza). But buried in this single value is tremendous insight into diet, metabolic efficiencies, and cardiovascular risk, with control using natural, non-medication means very easy to accomplish. Why are triglycerides important? Triglyceride levels of 60 mg/dl or higher will: Block insulin, thereby adding to weight gain and higher blood sugars Cause formation of small LDL particles. Triglycerides occur in the bloodstream mostly as Very Low-Density Lipoproteins, VLDL, that interact with other lipoprotein particles. Abundant triglycerides in VLDL encounter LDL particles and make them triglyceride-rich. This leads to the formation of small LDL particles that causes coronary heart disease and heart attack. At levels above normal, the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin are subjected to lipotoxicity, irreversible damage that can lead to inadequate insulin production by the pancreas over time. At very high levels above 1000 mg/dl, triglycerides cause pancreatitis, pancreatic inflammation that damages the delicate pancreatic tissues. The higher the triglycerides, the higher the cardiovascular risk. This may work through formation of small LDL particles or by other means. Labs typically quote 150 mg/dl or higher as the cutoff for “normal,” but this is not true: a level of 150 mg/dl is associated with a substantial quantity of the above metabolic distortions. Only at 60 mg/dl or below, for instance, do small LDL particles drop to much lower le Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made by the body and found in some animal-based foods. Blood cholesterol levels describe a group of fats also known as lipoproteins which includes HDL-C, or "good" cholesterol and LDL-C or "bad" cholesterol. Cholesterol is important to overall health, but when levels are too high, cholesterol can be harmful by contributing to narrowed or blocked arteries. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are more prone to having unhealthy high cholesterol levels, which contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD). By taking steps to manage cholesterol, individuals can reduce their chance of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Using a blood sample taken after a brief period of fasting by the patient, a lipoprotein profile reveals the following lipid measures: Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A high LDL-C level is associated with a higher risk for CVD. However, your LDL number should no longer be the main factor in guiding treatment to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the latest guidelines from the American Heart Association. For patients taking statins, it’s important to work with your doctor to manage your LDL appropriately. A diet high in saturated and trans fats can raise your LDL cholesterol. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL-C, higher levels are associated with a lower risk for CVD. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at higher risk for heart disease. People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, and certain drugs, such as beta-blockers and anabolic steroids, also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all contribute to lower HDL cholesterol. Triglycerid Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Troublesome Triglycerides (part 1)

Troublesome Triglycerides (part 1)

By now, you’ve heard that people with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing heart disease. You’ve also heard that it’s important to have your cholesterol level checked at least once a year, and that you should keep your LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol under 100 mg/dl (or 70 mg/dl if you’re at high risk for heart disease). You may even know about getting a “lipid profile” done once a year. What may seem a little murky is what triglycerides are, how they are related to heart health and diabetes, and what to do if they’re too high. So this is the topic for this week’s blog entry. Triglycerides are usually overshadowed by their cousin, cholesterol. And people often confuse triglycerides with cholesterol, thinking that they’re the same thing, but they’re not. However, it’s easy to understand the confusion, because there are a few similarities between the two. Both triglycerides and cholesterol are found in food, but are also made by the liver. Both are carried through the bloodstream by particles called lipoproteins. Both fall in the category of “blood fats,” or “blood lipids.” And both can contribute to heart disease if levels in the blood are too high. But that’s where the similarities end. What are triglycerides? Triglycerides are the body’s storage form of fat. Technically, triglycerides are also the fat we get from food sources, although we usually don’t call food fat “triglycerides.” For those of you who remember your chemistry, triglycerides consist of three fatty acids attached to a glycerol molecule. (Cholesterol, by the way, has a whole different chemical structure). When we eat, any calories that we don’t use for fuel get stored in our fat cells in the form of triglycerides. The body can draw upon these triglycerides Continue reading >>

What Do High Glucose & Triglyceride Blood Counts Mean?

What Do High Glucose & Triglyceride Blood Counts Mean?

If you have both elevated blood glucose and triglyceride levels, you may have metabolic syndrome, a group of health problems found to increase the risk of prediabetes, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), heart attack and stroke. According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), published in the May 2015 issue of "JAMA," nearly 35 percent of U.S. adults have metabolic syndrome. Three out of five diagnostic criteria need to be present to diagnose this syndrome. In addition to high glucose and triglyceride levels, the other criteria include a large waistline, high blood pressure and low HDL cholesterol -- a heart protective cholesterol found in the blood. Video of the Day Insulin resistance, a condition in which your body fails to use insulin properly, is present in most people with metabolic syndrome. If you have insulin resistance, you may be producing normal or even high levels of insulin, but the impaired action of insulin causes some glucose to remain in the blood and not move into body cells as expected. Insulin resistance often exists well before the diagnosis of prediabetes and T2DM, and leads to high glucose levels when the body isn't able to produce enough insulin to compensate for the hormone's impaired action. While several factors make insulin resistance more likely to occur, being overweight and inactive are major contributors. In addition to the risk of prediabetes and T2DM, prolonged insulin resistance also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood. They are a source of energy that comes from food, and excess is stored as body fat. While it's normal to have some triglycerides in the blood, elevated levels raise the risk of stroke, heart attack and heart disease. Your triglyceride level Continue reading >>

Can Cranberry Juice Control Blood Sugar And Lower Blood Pressure?

Can Cranberry Juice Control Blood Sugar And Lower Blood Pressure?

A new study found that drinking cranberry juice reduces some key risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, adds compelling evidence to the growing body of research on the benefits of berries on the heart. Cranberries are rich in a number of polyphenols, chemicals that have been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. They include procyanidins, quercetin, myricitrin, and anthocyanins. Quercetin, for example, has been shown to reduce blood pressure, while procyanidins have reduced C-reactive protein (CRP) in animal studies. Anthocyanins have lowered triglycerides in animal studies as well as inflammatory markers in people. In this study, researchers randomized patients into two groups, one that drank two 8-ounce glasses of low-calorie cranberry juice each day for eight weeks. The juice was sweetened with sucralose and had about 40 calories in each serving. The control group drank a similarly tasting drink that did not contain cranberry juice. Both drinks were supplied by Ocean Spray Cranberries, which partially funded the study, but was not involved in the analysis of the results. Both groups also followed a fully controlled diet to reduce other dietary variables. The study was double blind, so neither subjects nor researchers knew which people drank the juice versus the placebo. The group that drank low-calorie cranberry juice had lower levels of triglycerides (fatty acids) compared to the controls, and those with the highest level of triglycerides at the onset of the study saw the greatest decrease in the fatty acids. The juice drinkers also had lower diastolic blood pressure and lower levels of CRP, an inflammatory marker for cardiovascular disease. They had a 44% lower level of CRP than th Continue reading >>

How Food Affects High Triglycerides

How Food Affects High Triglycerides

For those diagnosed with high triglycerides, it’s important to take action to lower your levels and improve your heart health. Triglyceride is just a fancy word for fat — the fat in our bodies is stored in the form of triglycerides. Triglycerides are found in foods and manufactured in our bodies. Normal triglyceride levels are defined as less than 150 mg/dL; 150 to 199 is considered borderline high; 200 to 499 is high; and 500 or higher is officially called very high. To me, anything over 150 is a red flag indicating my client needs to take immediate steps to get the situation under control. High triglyceride levels make blood thicker and stickier, which means that it is more likely to form clots. Studies have shown that triglyceride levels are associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke — in both men and women — alone or in combination with other risk factors (high triglycerides combined with high LDL cholesterol can be a particularly deadly combination). For example, in one ground–breaking study, high triglycerides alone increased the risk of cardiovascular disease by 14 percent in men, and by 37 percent in women. But when the test subjects also had low HDL cholesterol (that’s the good cholesterol) and other risk factors, high triglycerides increased the risk of disease by 32 percent in men and 76 percent in women. Fortunately, triglycerides can often be easily controlled with several diet and lifestyle changes — many of the same changes that I outlined in my High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol sections. What Factors Can Increase Triglycerides? As with cholesterol, eating too much of the wrong kinds of fats will raise your blood triglycerides. Therefore, it’s important to restrict the amounts of saturated fats and trans fa Continue reading >>

Triglycerides & Heart Health

Triglycerides & Heart Health

What are triglycerides? Triglycerides are fats from the food we eat that are carried in the blood. Most of the fats we eat, including butter, margarines and oils, are in triglyceride form. Excess calories, alcohol or sugar in the body turn into triglycerides and are stored in fat cells throughout the body. How are triglycerides different from cholesterol? Triglycerides and cholesterol are both fatty substances known as lipids. But, triglycerides are fats; cholesterol is not. Cholesterol is a waxy, odorless substance made by the liver that is an essential part of cell walls and nerves. Cholesterol also plays an important role in body functions such as digestion and hormone production. In addition to being produced by the body, cholesterol comes from animal foods that we eat. Pure cholesterol cannot mix with or dissolve in the blood. Therefore, the liver packages cholesterol with triglycerides and proteins in carriers called lipoproteins. The lipoproteins move this fatty mixture to areas throughout the body. An elevated triglyceride level increases the risk of heart disease. When are triglyceride levels measured? Triglyceride levels are usually measured whenever you have a blood test called a Lipid Profile. Everyone over age 20 should have their cholesterol checked at least every 5 years. Your healthcare provider can check your cholesterol and triglyceride levels by taking a sample of blood, which is sent to a lab for testing. The Lipid Profile shows your triglyceride level, total cholesterol level, HDL cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein or “good” cholesterol) and LDL (low-density lipoprotein or “bad” cholesterol) levels. Blood triglyceride levels are normally high after you eat. Therefore, you should wait 12 hours after eating or drinking before you have your Continue reading >>

Its Added To Many Foods And May Be Raising Your Cholesterol

Its Added To Many Foods And May Be Raising Your Cholesterol

If you were to believe popular reports, cholesterol is the root cause of heart disease. But that is simply not true. The real culprit responsible for the rising number of cardiovascular disease is our high carb diet and the worst offender in this food group is added sugar. But how does simple sugar affect blood cholesterol? Why is cholesterol no longer bad for your heart? Read on to find out how what you believe about cholesterol may be hurting you. Cholesterol is often demonized in public press and medical literature for increasing the risk of atherosclerosis and heart disease. This simplistic view has fueled a number of myths and clouded the truth about the role of cholesterol in the body. Cholesterol is needed for the synthesis of sex hormones, adrenal hormones, bile acids and vitamin D. In fact, it is naturally produced in the liver. The liver makes about 75% of the cholesterol the body needs every day. The rest comes from the diet. Although, many physicians and health experts relentless advocate reducing blood cholesterol level, there is no scientific evidence to suggest that lowering total blood cholesterol reduces the risk of heart disease. In fact, a growing number of physicians report that many patients with heart disease have cholesterol levels well within normal ranges and that many who tested with high cholesterol levels are quite healthy. There are generally 2 types of blood cholesterol. HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. While HDL cholesterol is known as “good cholesterol” and LDL cholesterol is regarded as “bad cholesterol”, the truth is that cholesterol is neither good nor bad. Of more importance to cardiovascular health are triglycerides, another group of fats found in the blood. Studies sho Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar