diabetestalk.net

How Can You Test Yourself For Diabetes?

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

If you're in an at-risk group, you can get a free annual blood-glucose test The earlier diabetes is picked up, the better the prognosis, expert says One in three of us has raised blood-sugar levels, research suggests Some experts call these levels 'stage one diabetes' or 'pre-diabetes' So you think you might be at risk of type 2 diabetes — what next? If you are in one of the at-risk groups (over 25 and from a South Asian or Afro-Caribbean background, or Caucasian and over 40, particularly if you are overweight, obese or have a family history of diabetes) you can ask your GP for a free annual blood-glucose test. 'All the evidence shows that the earlier diabetes is picked up the better the prognosis, as it allows for better blood glucose control,' says Professor Anthony Barnett, a leading diabetes researcher based at Birmingham's Heartlands Hospital. 'A GP screening is best in a high-risk individual because it is free and they can then offer immediate treatment.' If you don't qualify for this, some chemists, such as Lloydspharmacy, will do a risk assessment involving a questionnaire looking at such factors as weight, age, diet and family history. If this indicates you are at risk of diabetes, you will be given a simple finger-prick blood test which checks your levels of glucose and gives immediate results. If your levels are above normal, you will be asked to come back and do a second test after fasting overnight. There are home test kits, which will give you the same reading as a pharmacy test, but a pharmacist's interpretation will be more informed, says Professor Barnett. People with borderline readings may benefit from a discussion with their GP, he adds. To get the most accurate result from a home test kit, he suggests taking it at least 1-2 hours after a meal, or Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

Being able to test blood glucose levels between routine doctor's or clinic visits is often an important part of managing diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, getting a blood glucose reading is important for working out an insulin dose, for example. For type 2 diabetes, getting a glucose reading is important, for example, in tracking how well managed the condition is and helping to prevent high and low blood sugar levels. Regular testing of your blood sugar can also help reduce the risk of long-term complications from diabetes. Ways to test your blood sugar levels with diabetes Traditional home blood glucose monitoring. The traditional method of testing your blood sugar is to prick your finger with a lancet - a very short, fine needle. You then put a drop of blood on a test strip and place the strip into a special measuring device known as a glucose meter. This then displays your blood sugar level. These meters vary in size, speed and cost. Many provide results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. They can also calculate an average blood glucose level over a period of time. Some also feature software kits that retrieve information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Meters and test strips are available at your local pharmacy. Devices that test other parts of your body. Newer devices allow you to test in areas other than your fingertips, such as your upper arm, forearm, thigh, and the base of your thumb. However, this may result in different blood glucose levels from those obtained from your fingertips. Blood glucose levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other parts of the body. This is especially true when your blood glucose is rapidly changing, such as after a meal or after exerci Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Many people with diabetes measure their blood sugar levels on their own. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin that is injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. Sugar levels can also be measured in body tissue. Measuring blood sugar levels yourself You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. The digital display shows your blood sugar level shortly afterwards. This is how the blood glucose meter is used: Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, you feel it less. You can get the right amount of blood by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measurements along with the date and time, and transfer this information to a computer or smartphone. If this is not possible, you could write the measurements down in a special diary. If you measure your blood sugar levels frequently, pricking yourself is less uncomfortable if you use a different finger, or a different place on your finger, each time. It can be helpful to read up about the different available glucose meters and how to use th Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

Tests For Pre-diabetes

Tests For Pre-diabetes

Tweet Pre-diabetes will usually be diagnosed by a doctor using either an HbA1c or a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test. However, in some cases, an OGTT test may also be carried out. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) The OGTT is a screening test that involves testing the individual's plasma glucose level following a glucose-rich drink (a beverage containing 75 grams of glucose). An OGTT may be used in people that show symptoms of diabetes but have not recorded diabetic levels with the HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose tests. The OGT test may be used for diagnosis, instead of the HbA1c in people with certain blood disorders such as shortened red blood cell life. People who have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or pre-diabetes will have a plasma glucose level of less than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) but equal to or greater than 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dl). Read more about the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Those people who have a plasma glucose level over or equal to 11.0 mmol/l (200 mg/dl) after two hours will be asked to have a fasting plasma glucose test to confirm diabetes diagnosis. The fasting plasma glucose test is used to diagnose diabetes, however. Fasting Plasma Glucose Test (FGT) The FGT test works by measuring the level of glucose in an individual's blood after a period of fasting. Anyone who is at a high risk of pre-diabetes should be given the FPG test. This includes those who are severely overweight or obese, people of South Asian or African-Caribbean descent, or anyone with a family history of diabetes. The fasting plasma glucose test is performed after a person fasts for at least 8 hours. Individuals who have a blood glucose level greater than or equal to 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) will be retested and, if the results are consistent, diagnosed with diabetes. If the results Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Do you want to be very sure that you’re doing ok on the prediabetes front? Here is a Prediabetes Test method that is used by medical experts who believe you can never be too careful with blood sugar. Step 1 Get yourself a good quality home glucometer. It will help you monitoring the glucose levels regularly. Step 2 Fast overnight. Twelve hours is a must. So if you ate dinner at 7pm, nothing except water till 7am. Take the first reading. This is called your Fasting Blood Glucose or FBG. Note this down. Step 3 Take the next blood sugar reading just before starting lunch Step 4 Eat your typical lunch. Once you’re done with lunch, do not eat anything else for the next 3 hours. After one hour of lunch, test for sugar and note it down. Step 5 Two hours after lunch, test again Step 6 Last test due: 3hrs after lunch Repeat these tests for two days, recording what you ate and what you measured for each test. Now that you know how to test for diabetes at home, read on to find out what these test results mean. What Are We Measuring in Prediabetes Test? The first test (Fasting Blood Sugar or FBG) tells us how much sugar is floating in your blood after you’ve fasted for 12 hours. It should be at its lowest at this point. Remember: The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. We, however, know that sugar can do serious damage (cardiac damage, risk of cancer etc.) at far lower levels than this. So doctors keen to protect their patients from even slight prediabetes damage want to see a number less than 86 mg/DL on this test. Maintain a diabetes test results chart at a place you can see daily and fill in the numbers regularly to keep track of your blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Preparing For Diabetes Labs And Other Tests

Preparing For Diabetes Labs And Other Tests

When people take insulin or diabetes pills to control blood sugar, it might take some extra planning before getting lab work and other tests done. Many tests, such as a blood test to measure cholesterol, require that a person stop eating, drinking, and taking medicine for a certain amount of time before the test. Tests can also be stressful for people. Stress can cause blood sugar levels to go up. When that happens, a person needs to test blood sugar levels more often and adjust medicine as needed. If you're worried about any tests that you have scheduled, even if the test isn't related to diabetes, talk to your doctor or other member of your health care team. Ask if you need to do anything special to prepare and whether the test might affect your blood sugar levels. Preparing for Tests Tests that require you to be at the medical facility for several hours Some tests require you to be at the medical facility for several hours. Even if you don't need to make any changes in what you eat or drink, tell the people in charge of the testing that you have diabetes. Ask if there are any special steps you need to take to make sure you can keep your blood sugar levels stable. A week or so before the test, make sure you know: What time you'll be having your test. How the test fits with your schedule for eating and taking your diabetes medicines. When your diabetes medicine is likely to reach its peak. If it's during the test, find out if you will be able to eat or drink something right before or right after the test to keep your blood sugar from dropping too low. On the day of your test: Take glucose tablets or a carbohydrate snack and your diabetes medicine with you to the test. Remind the people doing the test that you have diabetes. Tell them when you last ate and, if you take Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes And Heart Disease For $16

How To Prevent Diabetes And Heart Disease For $16

In the last article we discovered that the blood sugar targets established by the American Diabetes Association are far too high, and do not protect people from developing heart disease, diabetes or other complications. And we looked at what the scientific literature indicates are safer targets for fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c and either OGTT or post-meal blood sugar. On the other hand, we also discussed the importance of context: why it’s important not to rely on a single blood sugar marker, and how healthy people can sometimes have blood sugar spikes above 140 mg/dL one hour after a meal. Please keep this in mind as you read through the rest of this article. In this article I’m going to introduce a simple technique that, when used properly, is one of the most effective ways to maintain healthy blood sugar and prevent cardiovascular and metabolic disease – without unnecessary drugs. I love this technique because it’s: Cheap. You can buy the equipment you need for $16 online. Convenient. You can perform the tests in the comfort of your home, in your car, or wherever else you might be. Personalized. Instead of following some formula for how much carbohydrate you can safely eat, this method will tell you exactly what your carbohydrate tolerance is, and which carbs are “safe” and “unsafe” for you. Safe. Unlike the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), which can produce dangerous and horribly uncomfortable spikes in blood sugar, this strategy simply involves testing your blood sugar after your normal meals. The strategy I’m referring to is using a glucometer to test your post-meal blood sugars. It’s simple, accessible and completely bypasses the medical establishment and pharmaceutical companies by putting the power of knowledge in your hands. It’ Continue reading >>

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home blood glucose testing is a safe and affordable way to detect diabetes before it becomes a health issue. Diabetes, especially in the early stages, does not always cause symptoms. Almost half of people with the disease don't know they have it. For people already diagnosed with diabetes, a simple diabetes home test is vital in the management of blood sugar levels. It could even be lifesaving. How to test for diabetes at home Home blood glucose monitoring is designed to offer a picture of how the body is processing glucose. A doctor might recommend testing at three different times, and often over the course of several days: Morning fasting reading: This provides information about blood glucose levels before eating or drinking anything. Morning blood glucose readings give a baseline number that offers clues about how the body processes glucose during the day. Before a meal: Blood glucose before a meal tends to be low, so high blood glucose readings suggest difficulties managing blood sugar. After a meal: Post meal testing gives a good idea about how your body reacts to food, and if sugar is able to efficiently get into the cells for use. Blood glucose readings after a meal can help diagnose gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy. Most doctors recommend testing about 2 hours after a meal. For the most accurate testing, people should log the food they eat, and notice trends in their blood glucose readings. Whether you consume a high or low carbohydrate meal, if your blood sugar reading is higher than normal afterwards, this suggests the body is having difficulty managing meals and lowering blood glucose. After consulting a doctor about the right testing schedule and frequency, people should take the following steps: Read the manual for the blood glucose moni Continue reading >>

Test Yourself For Diabetes

Test Yourself For Diabetes

Diabetes can be deadly if left undiagnosed, so it is very important to pay attention to your body if you are displaying any of the symptoms. Early detection of diabetes can lessen the complications and, if caught in the prediabetic stage, the disease can be reversed. Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes include frequent urination, constant thirst, unexplained weight loss or gain, unusual hunger, or extreme fatigue and irritability. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes include all of the type 1 symptoms, but may also involve frequent infections, blurred vision, slow healing, tingling in the appendages, and being overweight and inactive. If you’re worried you might have diabetes, the most important thing is to see a doctor immediately and receive an official diagnosis. However, there is also a simple blood test you can perform at home that may tell you if you have diabetes. Here are the steps for performing an at-home test for diabetes: Purchase a blood sugar meter at any drug or grocery store. These can be found in Wal-Mart, CVS, Walgreens, Rite-Aid, and most other drug stores. These meters will probably come with free strips. Read the instructions on the package, and practice a few times if there are extra strips. All meters are different, so familiarize yourself with your meter. Test your sugar first thing in the morning before eating anything, and record the result. This will be your “fasting” blood sugar. Eat a carbohydrate-rich meal containing at least 60 grams of carbs. A bagel is good, or a boiled potato or cup of rice. Try to avoid fatty foods. One hour after eating, use the meter to test your blood sugar again, and record the results. Repeat every hour for the next 3 hours. A doctor can provide more accurate results, but the meter will give you a good indication of a proble Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels, called hyperglycemia. It’s considered an autoimmune disease, resulting from an immune system attack on the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin — a hormone that helps certain cells in the body absorb glucose. And without enough insulin, your blood glucose levels can rise to unhealthy levels, causing a range of health problems. Type 1 diabetes makes up only about 5 percent of all diabetes cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By comparison, type 2 diabetes — which develops when cells cannot use insulin properly — makes up 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases. However, type 1 and 2 diabetes often share the same symptoms associated with hyperglycemia. Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms Possible symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Excessive thirst or hunger Increased urination Unexplained weight loss Numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, or loss of feeling in the feet Fatigue Dry, itchy skin Vision changes, including blurry eyesight Slow-healing sores and increased rate of infections Nausea, vomiting, and stomach pains (in cases where the disease develops quickly) Without insulin and the ability to use sugar for energy, the body may start breaking down fat as an alternate source of energy, resulting in high levels of ketones (toxic acids) in the blood. This condition, called diabetic ketoacidosis, may cause: Dry skin and mouth Inability to keep fluids down Stomach pain Shortness of breath Flushed face "Fruity" smell to breath Diabetes and Hypoglycemia People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin — usually by injection, or by using an insulin pump — to provide their cells with the necessary hormone. However, too much insulin can cause cells t Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar