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How Can I Test My Blood Sugar Levels At Home?

K9diabetes.com

K9diabetes.com

The best way to monitor your dog’s diabetes is with home blood glucose testing, which is a lot easier to do than you might think! To see video of two dogs looking bored while having their blood sugar tested, click here! This type of testing gives you the most information about your dog’s blood glucose levels and is the only way to determine at home whether his blood sugar level is too low. In addition to checking your dog’s blood sugar when you are concerned about it, you can complete blood glucose curves at home to assess how well balanced your dog’s food and insulin are. A CURVE is a simple series of blood glucose checks. Start just before you feed and inject your dog by checking the blood sugar with a meter. Then check the blood sugar again every hour or two hours until the next meal and injection, longer if possible. This is a sample of a good curve—the blood sugar stays in a narrow range between 100 and 200 mg/dL. People who have diabetes monitor their blood sugar with a small portable meter that tests a tiny drop of blood for the amount of glucose it contains. You can use the same meters to test your dog, with some comparisons and possibly adjustments to the readings to account for some differences between the blood cells of dogs and people. There are also meters that are pre-adjusted for dogs to reflect the average difference. However, since your dog may not fit the average and these meters are much more expensive to purchase and use, we recommend starting home blood glucose testing with a regular meter set for humans. The meter itself is often free or nearly free after a rebate. The test strips, which are the long-term cost of home testing, are much less expensive for the meters people use. Once you are proficient at home testing, you can always transi Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

How To Test Your Blood Sugar

To check your blood sugar level, gather your blood glucose meter, a test strip and your lancing device. Watch the video below or follow the steps outlined here. See how to prepare the meter and test strip, lance your finger and get a reading using the Accu-Chek® Aviva Plus system. The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your hands—using warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spot—don't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Discard the used lancet properly. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

How Often Do I Need To Test My Blood Glucose?

How Often Do I Need To Test My Blood Glucose?

Tweet How often to test blood sugar levels is a common question particularly amongst people that are newly diagnosed with diabetes or that have moved onto a new treatment regimen. The frequency at which you should test your blood will be dependent upon the treatment regimen you are on as well as individual circumstances. Blood glucose testing can help you to identify any hypos and hypers and provide information on how to keep your diabetes under control It is sadly quite common for some people's healthcare team to suggest people with diabetes to test less often or not test at all even when their patients are keen. Should I test my blood glucose levels? If you are on medication that puts you at risk of hypos, you should test your blood glucose levels. Medications that can cause hypos include: Insulin (all types of insulin) Sulphonylureas (glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolbutamide) Prandial glucose regulators (repaglinide, nateglinide) This means that all people with type 1 diabetes need to regularly test their blood glucose levels. If you have another type of diabetes and are not on any of the medication above, there is less necessity to test your blood sugar but there is still plenty of benefit to be had in testing your blood sugar. Read about the benefits of blood glucose testing It has previously been reported by research that some people may find blood glucose testing distressing. This is more likely to be the case when people have not received education about how to interpret and act upon the results. When people know how to interpret the results, blood glucose testing is usually regarded as a substantial benefit. Blood glucose testing for type 1 diabetes The 2015 NICE guidelines recommend that people with type 1 diabetes test their blood glucos Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

Diabetes Home Testing

Diabetes Home Testing

Why do I have to test my blood sugar? Testing your blood sugar is the best way to find out how well your diabetes is controlled. A log book of your blood sugar levels will help you see how food, physical activity, and diabetes medicines affect your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is too low or too high, your health care provider might want to adjust your diet, exercise, or the amount of medicine you are taking. Take your log book with you whenever you visit your health care provider. When should I test my blood sugar? The most common times to test your blood sugar level are before meals and at bedtime. Your health care provider will tell you how often and when to check your blood sugar. What tests do I need to do at home? Blood test: The blood test is used to measure the amount of sugar in your blood. It will help you find out if your meal plan, exercise, and medicine are working to control your blood sugar. Urine test: The urine test looks for ketones in your urine. This can be done if you are sick or if your blood sugar level is very high. Meters are also available that can test your blood for ketones. Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

BLOOD SUGAR TESTING OVERVIEW If you have diabetes, you have an important role in your own medical care, and testing your blood glucose (also called blood sugar) is an opportunity for you to take control of your health. Although diabetes is a chronic condition, it can usually be controlled with lifestyle changes and medication. The main goal of treatment is to keep blood sugar levels in the normal or near-normal range. Checking your blood sugar is one of the best ways to know how well your diabetes treatment plan is working. Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) have also become popular, especially for people who use an insulin pump. (See 'Continuous glucose monitoring' below.) A health care provider will periodically order a laboratory blood test to determine your blood sugar levels and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). This test gives an overall sense of how blood sugar levels are controlled since it indicates your average blood sugar level of the past two to three months (table 1). However, fine-tuning of blood sugar levels and treatment also requires that you monitor your own blood sugar levels on a day-to-day basis. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to know your blood glucose level at any time and helps prevent the consequences of very high or very low blood sugar. Monitoring also enables tighter blood sugar control, which decreases the long-term risks of diabetic complications. HOW TO PERFORM BLOOD SUGAR TESTING The following steps include general guidelines for testing blood sugar levels; you should get specific details for your blood glucose monitors from the package insert or your health care provider. Never share blood glucose monitoring equipment or fingerstick lancing devices. Sharing of this equipment could result in transmission of infection, such as hepatitis Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing your blood glucose, also known as Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), is a method of checking how much glucose (sugar) is in the blood using a glucose meter -- anywhere, anytime. Here, you'll learn some basics about: Blood sugar targets for adults How your doctor tests your blood The importance of self-testing When to test and what to look for How to share results with your doctor Blood glucose targets for non-pregnant adults* Before meal After meal 80-120 mg/dL Less than 180 mg/dL How your doctor tests your blood -- the A1C test† Your doctor uses what is called an A1C (Glycosylated Hemoglobin) test to see what your average blood glucose level has been over the last two to three months. Used for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, it gives you and your doctor an indication on how well you are responding to your treatment regimen, and if any adjustments are necessary. The goal is to keep your level below seven percent (7%).* The A1C test is sometimes referred to as the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The connection between A1C and average blood sugar levels.† Your A1C test result will not show the daily effects of food choices and your activity. A blood glucose meter is the best way to observe and track the immediate effects of food choices and activity on your blood glucose levels. This allows you to take immediate action to bring your glucose levels within range if needed. Your doctor will also rely upon your blood glucose meter results to assess and adjust your treatment regimen. When to test and what to look for – a practical guide Use this simple chart to remind you when to test and what to observe to help you manage your blood glucose level on a daily basis. When to test What to look for First thing in the morning, before you eat How Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

Being able to test blood glucose levels between routine doctor's or clinic visits is often an important part of managing diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, getting a blood glucose reading is important for working out an insulin dose, for example. For type 2 diabetes, getting a glucose reading is important, for example, in tracking how well managed the condition is and helping to prevent high and low blood sugar levels. Regular testing of your blood sugar can also help reduce the risk of long-term complications from diabetes. Ways to test your blood sugar levels with diabetes Traditional home blood glucose monitoring. The traditional method of testing your blood sugar is to prick your finger with a lancet - a very short, fine needle. You then put a drop of blood on a test strip and place the strip into a special measuring device known as a glucose meter. This then displays your blood sugar level. These meters vary in size, speed and cost. Many provide results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. They can also calculate an average blood glucose level over a period of time. Some also feature software kits that retrieve information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Meters and test strips are available at your local pharmacy. Devices that test other parts of your body. Newer devices allow you to test in areas other than your fingertips, such as your upper arm, forearm, thigh, and the base of your thumb. However, this may result in different blood glucose levels from those obtained from your fingertips. Blood glucose levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other parts of the body. This is especially true when your blood glucose is rapidly changing, such as after a meal or after exerci Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

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