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Hormones Involved In Type 2 Diabetes

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Type 2 Diabetes: Key Facts

Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. This number reflects the 21 million who are currently diagnosed and another 8.1 million who do not even know they have diabetes. There are several key differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The most important difference is in the hormone insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin at all. People with type 2 diabetes still produce insulin, however the cells in the muscles, liver and fat tissue are inefficient at absorbing the insulin and regulating glucose. As a result, the body tries to compensate by having the pancreas pump out more insulin. But Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RJ84

    Anyone else find that their blood sugar can rise without having anything to eat or drink in the morning ?
    If on waking up my blood sugar is say 5.5, if I don't have anything to eat or drink and check it again maybe about an hour later it will more often than not have shot up to about 12.0 or 15.0.
    This has always been the case and not just started happening lately.
    I'm type 1 and have been for almost 7 years.
    My diabetic nurse doesn't seem to have any idea either.
    Thanks

  2. kegstore

    Try eating some breakfast! It may sound odd, but that's probably what you need to do (along with your normal insulin as appropriate). If you're up and out of bed charging around on an empty stomach your liver will compensate by releasing glycogen which raises your blood sugar. This used to happen to me, and still does occasionally as I really don't like eating much first thing.

  3. cocacola

    kegstore said:
    If you're up and out of bed charging around on an empty stomach your liver will compensate by releasing glycogen which raises your blood sugar. This used to happen to me, and still does occasionally as I really don't like eating much first thing. Shame the diabetes nurse couldn't give that explanation. Thanks.
    There is no way I could go without breakfast :lol:

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