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Highest Blood Sugar Ever Recorded

How To Avoid Getting Too Cozy With Bad Blood Sugars

How To Avoid Getting Too Cozy With Bad Blood Sugars

“I know what I'm looking for but I just can't find it I guess I gotta look inside of myself some more” —Donovan People, in any circumstance, can become acclimatized to their conditions. It’s a nice survival trait we humans have, but it can have negative repercussions for diabetics. If you get “used to” having bad blood sugars, then you may get complacent and stop trying as hard to have better control. What’s more, “good” readings might feel funny to you since you’re not used to them. The limits of your body When most people ascend higher than 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea level, serious and immediate medical problems often occur due to the lower levels of oxygen. However, communities of people in some parts of the Andes, Ethiopia, and Tibet, to name a few, have thrived in even higher elevations for thousands of years. Dallol, Ethiopia is the hottest place on Earth. The average high temperature in winter is 97ºF (36ºC), and in summer it’s 116ºF (47ºC). And that’s just the average; it can get much hotter. Absolutely unbearable to anyone reading this, yet people have indeed lived there, working in mines and learning – somehow – to deal with the heat. Danger and unpleasantness aside, it’s physically and psychologically possible. Oymyakon, a town in Siberian Russia, is the opposite: the average summer low is 43ºF (6ºC), in winter -50ºF (-58ºC). (Again, that’s the averages; the record low was -96ºF or -71ºC). But people live there year round, dealing with the permafrost and the months-long spells of lethally low temperatures. And several communities, which have existed for thousands of years, dot the landscape around the Dead Sea in Israel and Jordan, despite the fact that the Sea is 429 meters (1,407 feet) below sea level, and Continue reading >>

Monitoring Diabetes

Monitoring Diabetes

Even after a long period of stability, your dog or cat's insulin requirements may change as a result of: Change in exercise regimen This is why it's important to continually monitor your pet's progress and consult your veterinarian if there are sudden changes or if anything unusual happens. Monitoring your dog's or cat's glucose level Monitoring your pet's glucose level is an important part of the overall therapy for diabetes and can be done in 2 ways: Checking your pet's urine for the presence of glucose and ketones (a chemical produced by the body when it burns fat for energy). This is not as accurate as measuring glucose in the blood, but can be done at home easily. Measuring glucose level in your pet's blood. This is the most accurate method and is done either by your veterinarian in the clinic or at home with a portable glucometer and blood test strips. If your pet has significant weight gain or loss, talk to your veterinarian about how this may affect diabetes treatment. Monitoring glucose and ketones in your pet's urine Immediately following diagnosis, your veterinarian may ask you to check your pet's urine glucose, 1 to 3 times a day: FOR DOGS Early in the morning, just prior to the time of the Vetsulin injection and first meal. Late in the afternoon, before the second meal. Late in the evening. As your pet's management progresses, less frequent testing will be needed. Regular examinations remain important though, because your pet's insulin needs can change. What you need Clean containers for collecting urine. Urine dipsticks from your veterinarian. A place to record results. Collecting urine For dogs: take your dog out for a walk on a leash. Keep your dog on a leash so that it will be within reach when it urinates. For cats: place your cat in its litter box.* H Continue reading >>

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Level Ever Measured In A Person?

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Level Ever Measured In A Person?

Amazingly, this 'achievement' belongs to a young man named Michael Patrick Buonocore: He reached a level of 2656 mg/dl. (approx 147mmol) The highest I have ever seen was in a 40 year old male in the Emergency Department. He had been told by his Dr that he was 'probably' a diabetic and had developed an abscess on his lower back. He was in the main area of our department but looked terribly unwell. After taking an ABG (an arterial blood gas) I re-checked it twice before I accepted that it was accurate. His blood glucose was only 1350mg/dl (75mmol) Nowhere near that of young Michael, still the sickest patient in the department that day by 'a country mile' (an English expression meaning by a long way) Continue reading >>

Highest Blood Sugar Level

Highest Blood Sugar Level

Michael Patrick Buonocore (USA) (b. 19 May 2001), survived a blood sugar level of 147.6 mmol/L (2,656 mg/dl) when admitted to the Pocono Emergency Room in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, USA, on 23 March 2008. The normal blood sugar range is between 4.4 to 6.6 mmol/L (80-120 mg/dl). All records listed on our website are current and up-to-date. For a full list of record titles, please use our Record Application Search. (You will be need to register / login for access) Comments below may relate to previous holders of this record. Continue reading >>

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

My most recent A1C was nothing to be proud of, but I consoled myself with the thought that it was hardly the worst in history. That got me wondering: What was the all-time worst A1C? Who holds this dubious record, and how high is it possible to go? I decided to pound the pavement and try to find out. So where to start when looking for a diabetes record? Well, with the Guinness Book of World Records, of course. But oddly, the Guinness people don’t seem to have any listings related to A1Cs. They do, however, report that Michael Patrick Buonocore survived a blood sugar of 2,656 mg/dL upon admittance to the ER in East Stroudsburg, PA, on March 23, 2008. Michael was a T1 kiddo at the time, and that record-high sugar level was part of his diagnosis experience. So does Michael also hold the record for top A1C? No. Because while he’s living (thankfully) proof that stratospheric blood sugar levels are possible, a sky-scraping A1C requires both altitude and time. Remember that A1Cs provide a three-month average of our blood sugars. Individual high BG readings, even crazy-high ones, don’t alter the test as much as you’d think if they last only a short time. Because type 1 in kids Michael's age hit so quickly, I figured his A1C would have been rather middle of the road. It takes a slow burn to make an A1C boil. But just to be sure, I reached out to his parents, who tell me his A1C was 11.9 at diagnosis. Higher than I expected, but not too high given the four-digit BG reading. (If his 2,656 had been his average blood sugar for three months, his A1C would have been roughly 95! Yes, that’s 95.0, not 9.5). The highest A1C turns out to be a tricky piece of data to ferret out. If you try Google, you find a gazillion people talking about their own personal highest A1Cs, and comp Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: not taking insulin severe infection severe illness bad insulin In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also freque Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Hyperglycemia And Diabetes

The Relationship Between Hyperglycemia And Diabetes

Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is a condition that occurs when there is too much glucose in the blood. It is common among people with diabetes and can become a potentially life-threatening situation if it is allowed rise above a critical level. A normal blood sugar range is between 80 and 120 mg/dl. When it rises above this threshold, a number of common symptoms can develop, including: Blurry vision Increased thirst or having a dry mouth Feeling weak or tired Needing to urinate more frequently than usual If the blood sugar rises above 240 mg/dl, it can lead to a diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious medical condition which can start with fever and abdominal pain and progress to vomiting, confusion, unconsciousness, seizure, and even death. Causes of Hyperglycemia in Diabetes High blood sugar in diabetes is most often associated with three things: diet and insulin management. Among the most common causes of hyperglycemia in diabetics: Not giving yourself enough insulin Failure of your insulin pump Eating beyond what is in your meal plan Eating too much at one time or just before bedtime Stress, which can produce cortisol and epinephrine and, in turn, glucose Illnesses which can also raise stress hormones Hormone fluctuations can also occur during the course of the day and lead to unexpected rises in blood sugar level. One such condition, called the Somogyi effect, is characterized by high blood sugar upon waking. This is usually caused by a sudden drop of glucose at night during which the body responds to by overproducing glucose while you sleep. Other Complications of Hyperglycemia In addition to the typical symptoms of hyperglycemia, there are some that are less commonly known which can affect men and women differently. In men, chronic hyperglycemia can increase Continue reading >>

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Reading Recorded?

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Reading Recorded?

If only we could open the Guinness Book of World Records and get the answer to “What is the highest blood sugar reading recorded?” The true answer probably comes down to two answers. First, we probably will never know. No one really seems to keep track of this kind of stuff, except for unconfirmed reports on various internet bulletin boards. Some boards have people claiming to have 2000 or even higher. (BUT, leave your highest treading below in the comments to compare!) I am not sure you would even be alive if they were that high! Nonetheless, most blood glucose meters stop reading at 600 mg/L, so this tends to be the outer fringe of home tested high glucose levels. Second, the answer depends on the test. There are two tests that are typically done. It should also be noted that each individual will have a different “normal” level. What is a high reading for one person may be normal for another. Only your doctor can really tell you what is the “right” number for you. But first, let’s see what different blood sugar readings mean and how they are tested. One test is the A1C and it is done at your doctor’s office. This test measures a person’s blood glucose levels for the last three months. A good reading is 6 or below, an acceptable reading is 7 or below, while a poor reading (a must get help reading!) is anything above 7. A detailed description of the A1C test can be found here. The second test is self testing. This is often done by the individual multiple times per day using a blood glucose monitor. The monitors measure either the plasma or whole blood levels. The following are the recommend readings for each test: Recommended Plasma Test Results Recommended Whole Blood Test Results A rough comparison chart for A1C versus Plasma readings is below: A1c P Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Basics - Monitoring

Diabetes: The Basics - Monitoring

Listen to Diabetes: The Basics—Monitoring Audio Introduction to Monitoring Monitoring is defined as observing something and keeping a record of it. In health care situations, you can monitor anything about your body or your reaction to your care plan that matters to your long-term health. If you have diabetes, you need to monitor your own blood sugar (or glucose). In addition, you may need to monitor your own weight and blood pressure. You can also monitor your own actions and feelings, such as what and how much you eat, or whether you feel stressed. This section of these recordings covers how to monitor blood sugar, and also has some information about monitoring blood pressure. If you need to monitor other factors, you will need to decide what to observe, when to observe it, and how to record it. The information you gain from monitoring will help you, your doctor, and your diabetes educator know if diabetes care plan is working well for you. Then you can decide if you need to make changes. Monitoring Your Blood Glucose When You Have Visual Impairment: 5 Frequently Asked Questions When you have diabetes, your good health depends on your ability to both monitor and understand your blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure, weight, and body temperature. If you have vision loss, there are a variety of large print and talking blood glucose meters, blood pressure monitors, thermometers, and weight scales available, with newer, more advanced models frequently becoming available. AFB provides regular evaluations of the latest devices. Below are a few guidelines for the care and use of these items. 1. What is a "normal" blood glucose reading? Your blood glucose (blood sugar) will fluctuate throughout the day; however, it should remain within a certain range. Currently, ther Continue reading >>

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Blood glucose levels normally rise after a high-carbohydrate meal and drop back to normal levels within a few hours. But if your glucose levels rise higher than normal and recover more slowly, you might have diabetes. Your doctor can administer tests that measure your blood glucose levels immediately before you consume a high-carbohydrate meal and for several hours afterward. If you already have diabetes, your doctor might want you to check your blood glucose levels after meals, to make sure you're keeping your glucose within the expected range. Normal Levels After Eating Healthy, non-diabetic people normally have blood glucose levels of less than 120 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a normal meal, rarely exceeding 140 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association. Levels return to normal within two to three hours. When you undergo a glucose tolerance test, you consume a high-carbohydrate drink or snack containing 75 grams of carbohydrate. At one hour, your test falls into the normal, non-diabetic range if your blood glucose remains below 200 mg/dL. Two hours after your meal, blood glucose should remain below 140 mg/dL. A level of over 200 mg/dL at two hours post-prandial -- which means after a meal -- indicates diabetes. Levels between 140 and 200 mg/dL indicate pre-diabetes, a condition with a strong risk of developing diabetes in the future. Expected Results in Diabetics Diabetics experience larger spikes in blood glucose that take longer to return to baseline. For diabetics, blood glucose an hour after eating should remain below 180 mg/dL or no more than 80 mg/dL over your pre-meal levels. The highest spikes in blood glucose levels often occur after breakfast. If you experience hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose levels before a meal, you might experi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Principles Of Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Principles Of Treatment In Dogs

This handout provides detailed information on the principles of treatment in diabetes mellitus. For more information about diabetes mellitus and its treatment, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information" and "Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. In dogs, diabetes mellitus is usually Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 2 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from the destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. Insulin regulates the level of glucose in the bloodstream and controls the delivery of glucose to the tissues of the body. The clinical signs seen in diabetes mellitus are related to the elevated concentrations of blood glucose, and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, there are two types of diabetes mellitus. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of the disease differ somewhat between the two. "Type I Diabetes Mellitus is the most common type of diabetes in dogs." Type I Diabetes Mellitus (sometimes also caused Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus), results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. Type II Diabetes Mellitus (sometimes called Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus), is differ Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

What tests can I use to check my blood sugar level? There are 2 blood tests that can help you manage your diabetes. One of these tests is called an A1C test, which reflects your blood sugar (or blood glucose) control over the past 2-3 months. Testing your A1C level every 3 months is the best way for you and your doctor to understand how well your blood sugar levels are controlled. Your A1C goal will be determined by your doctor, but it is generally less than 7%. The other test is called SMBG, or self-monitoring of blood glucose. Using a blood glucose monitor to do SMBG testing can help you improve control of your blood sugar levels. The results you get from an SMBG test can help you make appropriate adjustments to your medicine, diet and/or level of physical activity. Every person who has diabetes should have a blood glucose monitor (also called a home blood sugar meter, a glucometer, or a glucose meter) and know how to use it. Your doctor may prescribe a blood glucose monitor. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved meters that work without pricking your finger. But these meters cannot replace regular glucose meters. They are used to get additional readings between regular testing. What supplies do I need? You will need a glucose meter, alcohol pads, sterile finger lancets and sterile test strips. Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for these supplies. How do I pick a glucose meter? Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for your glucose meter. If so, your plan may only pay for a certain meter. If your insurance plan doesn’t pay for glucose meters, ask your doctor which meters he or she recommends. Shop around and compare costs. Consider what features are important to you. For example, some meters are Continue reading >>

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

i was recently tested for Hemoglobin A1c because i presented to an endocrinologist with extremely low blood glucose on lab test and some scary symptoms, not the ordinary hypoglycemia symptoms. My A1c was 4.7 which registered as low (L) on the lab print out–it was only slightly low. Does a low score on this suggest a possibility of short-lived RBCs? Does it have any relationship with extremely low blood glucose? my result at the lab, fasting, was 32mg/dL. Not long after that i got a home glucometer and i get the same kind of results on that as the lab got, in the 20s and 30s first thing in the morning, every day. did not know i had hypoglycemia until i had that lab test, though i had had one episode where i woke up with ataxia, i fell while walking to the bathroom first thing in the morning, i got up and immediately fell again. I soon found that i had very impaired coordination. i did not know why and i was very worried. Eventually i wanted to have breakfast but had great difficulty holding the measuring cup under the faucet, to get some water to heat, to make instant oatmeal, i lacked the coordination to get the water into the cup. I persisted and did make the instant oatmeal (pour hot water onto flakes and it’s done), and i got my lap top and was eating the oatmeal and i suddenly was aware that the symptoms were going away. Previously i had been unable to type. While eating the small amount of oatmeal, i realized i could type. That was about a month before the lab test. Since it only happened that once, i put it out of my mind. About 5 days after the lab test, i had the second episode, worse than the first, i woke falling out of bed to the floor, couldn’t use my arm to break the fall, i didn’t have the coordination. i sat on the floor, i could not get up and wa Continue reading >>

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