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High Fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes What The Experts Say

What Is High-fructose Corn Syrup? What Are The Health Concerns?

What Is High-fructose Corn Syrup? What Are The Health Concerns?

High-fructose corn syrup is a common sweetener in sodas and fruit-flavored drinks. As use of high-fructose corn syrup has increased, so have levels of obesity and related health problems. Some wonder if there's a connection. Research has shown that high-fructose corn syrup is chemically similar to table sugar. Controversy exists, however, about whether the body handles high-fructose corn syrup differently than table sugar. At this time, there's insufficient evidence to say that high-fructose corn syrup is any less healthy than other types of sweeteners. It is known, however, that too much added sugar of all kinds — not just high-fructose corn syrup — can contribute unwanted calories that are linked to health problems, such as weight gain, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and high triglyceride levels. All of these boost your risk of heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends that most women get no more than 100 calories a day of added sugar from any source, and that most men get no more than 150 calories a day of added sugar. That's about 6 teaspoons of added sugar for women and 9 teaspoons for men. If you're concerned about your health, the smart play is to cut back on added sugar, regardless of the type. Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup & Diabetes

High Fructose Corn Syrup & Diabetes

Come January 1st, many of us will resolve to limit sugar in our diets. Of course, then we’ll spot a donut, and all bets are off. But if there was ever a time to seriously reconsider our consumption of the sweet stuff, now would be it: New research is linking one particular sweetener to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The sweetener in question is high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which earlier research has suggested is linked to obesity and heart disease. The syrup is sweeter and cheaper than sugar, making it a mainstay for many US packaged snacks and sodas. But now researchers, writing in the journal Global Public Health, warn that more high fructose corn syrup also means more diabetes. They analyzed data from 43 countries and found a 20% higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in countries that use it, compared to countries that don’t. In countries that don’t use HFCS, like India, Ireland, and Sweden, researchers found that type 2 diabetes occurred at an average rate of 6.7%. Big consumers of HFCS, like the US, Hungary, and Canada, had average rates of 8%. The trend existed irrespective of a country’s overall sugar intake or obesity levels. Might HFCS really be one culprit of diabetes? Study author Michael Goran, PhD, professor of preventive medicine, physiology & biophysics, and pediatrics at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, thinks so. HFCS has about 10% more fructose than sucrose, and fructose is metabolized almost solely by the liver. That’s a lot of work for one organ, and Goran says that this extra kick of fructose might contribute to HFCS’s negative metabolic effects. Goran adds that he sees several big differences between HFCS and sugar. Though both are highly processed, sugar is purified from a natural source, he Continue reading >>

Because High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Metabolized Differently, The Problems Associated With Its Consumption Are Worse Than With Sugar Or Other Sweeteners - Dr. Russell Schierling

Because High Fructose Corn Syrup Is Metabolized Differently, The Problems Associated With Its Consumption Are Worse Than With Sugar Or Other Sweeteners - Dr. Russell Schierling

IS IT REALLY NO DIFFERENT THAN OTHER SUGARS OR SWEETENERS? Muhammad Aamir Akhter - Lahore./Pakistan - Pixabay "So what does the science say? While media and blog headlines have slammed high fructose corn syrup, scientists and experts have been evaluating the controversy and coming to different conclusions. Their view? Research shows HFCS, sugar and other sweeteners are basically the same from a health perspective." From Sweet Surprise --- the website of the CRA (Corn Refiners Association). "The use of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has increased over the past several decades in the United States, while overweight and obesity rates have risen dramatically..... The Center for Food, Nutrition, and Agriculture Policy convened an expert panel to discuss the published scientific literature examining the relationship between consumption of HFCS or "soft drinks" (proxy for HFCS) and weight gain...... The fructose:glucose (F:G) ratio in the U.S. food supply has not appreciably changed since the introduction of HFCS in the 1960s..... Based on the currently available evidence, the expert panel concluded that HFCS does not appear to contribute to overweight and obesity any differently than do other energy sources." From a 2007 issue of the medical journal Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition (A Critical Examination of the Evidence Relating High Fructose Corn Syrup and Weight Gain). "The hypothesis that the replacement of sucrose with HFCS in beverages plays a causative role in obesity is not supported on the basis of its composition, biological actions or short-term effects on food intake. Had the hypothesis been phrased in the converse, namely that replacing HFCS with sucrose in beverages would be a solution to the obesity epidemic, its merit would have been seen more Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup: How Dangerous Is It?

High Fructose Corn Syrup: How Dangerous Is It?

High fructose corn syrup: How dangerous is it? In the grand tradition of nutritional scapegoating, high fructose corn syrup has stepped into the spotlight as dietary enemy No. 1. It's an easy target. The corn-based sweetener is found throughout the American diet, in everything from sugary foods like soda and cookies to savory products like tomato sauce and salad dressing. That's precisely the problem, say critics who blame the vast quantities we consume for the nation's soaring rates of obesity and diabetes . But not everyone is convinced. Last June, the Corn Refiners Association launched an ad campaign telling the other side of the story namely, that HFCS is "made from corn [and] has the same calories as sugar." The mixed messages have left consumers looking for answers . Prevention investigated and found little conclusive evidence to confirm the anti-HFCS crusade. Still, concerned researchers say there are reasons to keep your intake to a minimum. Here, we address the most common claims about HFCS and have experts weigh in so you can make the best choice for your health. Table sugar and HFCS have the same number of calories. The verdict: "Gram for gram, table sugar and high fructose corn syrup are equal in calories," says Tanya Zuckerbrot, RD, a New York City-based nutritionist. They are also equally sweet. And both consist of two simple sugars fructose and glucose in roughly the same proportions (though the two sugars are merely blended together in HFCS, versus chemically bonded in sugar). Your body breaks down both products in virtually the same way, says Michael F. Jacobson, PhD, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. He adds, "There's no evidence that high fructose corn syrup is worse than sugar once it's in your body." Still, we kno Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes

High-fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes

Nov. 27, 2012 -- Countries that mix high-fructose corn syrup into processed foods and soft drinks have higher rates of diabetes than countries that don’t use the sweetener, a new study shows. In a study published in the journal Global Health, researchers compared the average availability of high-fructose corn syrup to rates of diabetes in 43 countries. About half the countries in the study had little or no high-fructose corn syrup in their food supply. In the other 20 countries, high-fructose corn syrup in foods ranged from about a pound a year per person in Germany to about 55 pounds each year per person in the United States. The researchers found that countries using high-fructose corn syrup had rates of diabetes that were about 20% higher than countries that didn’t mix the sweetener into foods. Those differences remained even after researchers took into account data for differences in body size, population, and wealth. But couldn’t that mean that people in countries that used more high-fructose corn syrup were just eating more sugar or more total calories? The researchers say no: There were no overall differences in total sugars or total calories between countries that did and didn’t use high-fructose corn syrup, suggesting that there’s an independent relationship between high-fructose corn syrup and diabetes. “It raises a lot of questions about fructose,” says researcher Michael I. Goran, PhD, co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. Although the study found an association, it doesn’t establish a cause/effect relationship. Not everyone is convinced. Audrae Erickson is president of the Corn Refiners Association, an industry group that recently pe Continue reading >>

Study Finds Link Between High Fructose Corn Syrup, Type 2 Diabetes

Study Finds Link Between High Fructose Corn Syrup, Type 2 Diabetes

Study finds link between high fructose corn syrup, Type 2 diabetes Soda is one contributor of sugar to the human diet. (Bloomberg ) Researchers from USC and the University of Oxford say they have found an association between countries that have more high fructose corn syrup in their food supply and those that have higher rates of diabetes. Countries with higher use of HFCS had an average prevalence of Type 2 diabetes of 8%, compared with 6.7% in countries that dont use it, according to the research published Tuesday in the journal Global Public Health. Those differences held, the researchers said, after adjustments for body mass index, population and gross domestic product. HFCS appears to pose a serious public health problem on a global scale, Michael Goran, the lead author of the study and a professor of preventive medicine, director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center and co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at the Keck School of Medicine at USC, said in a statement. The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates HFCS consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar. The researchers reported that of 42 countries studied, the United States had the highest per capita consumption of HFCS: 55 pounds a year. The second-highest was Hungary, at 46 pounds. Countries that had a per capita annual consumption rate of about a pound or less included Australia, China, Denmark, France, India, Ireland, Italy, Sweden, Britain and Uruguay. Dr. Robert Lustig, a professor at UC San Francisco and director of the Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health Program there, noted that the researchers did not show that higher consumption of high fructose corn syrup caused the incr Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes

Q: I read that high-fructose corn syrup causes type 2 diabetes. How can I avoid eating it? A: Consuming high-fructose corn syrup is not the sole factor for the cause of type 2 diabetes. (High-fructose corn syrup has a carbohydrate profile similar to that of white table sugar -- about 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose.) However, it is used to sweeten many prepared and commercial foods, and consuming too many foods with high-fructose corn syrup as well as other calorie-containing ingredients increases caloric intake and eventually causes weight gain in some people. It is the weight gain that leads to excess weight. It is excess weight along with other risk factors of type 2 diabetes that causes it. To avoid consuming high-fructose corn syrup, check the ingredients to see whether a food contains it. Also check to see how far down on the ingredient list it is. Ingredients are listed in descending order by quantity used (by weight). High-fructose corn syrup is often used as a sweetener in: Jeannette Jordan, M.S., R.D., CDE, is the American Dietetic Association's national spokesperson for African-American nutrition issues and oversees nutrition education at the Medical University of South Carolina. Continue reading >>

Which Is Better, High-fructose Corn Syrup Or Table Sugar?

Which Is Better, High-fructose Corn Syrup Or Table Sugar?

Which is better, high-fructose corn syrup or table sugar? Q. I've been trying to avoid high-fructose corn syrup. Is table sugar a healthier alternative? A. Wouldn't it be nice if there were a healthy sugar that you could eat guilt-free? Unfortunately, when it comes to high-fructose corn syrup and table sugar, there really isn't a "good" option. High-fructose corn syrup and table sugar are actually pretty similar from a chemical standpoint. High-fructose corn syrup is derived from cornstarch, which is first broken down to create a substance that is 100% glucose. Makers then add enzymes to that mix to turn some of that glucose into another type of sugar, fructose, which is also found in your favorite fruits. So, high-fructose corn syrup is a mix of glucose, and typically, between 42% and 55% fructose, according to the FDA. Table sugar, or sucrose, is made by crystallizing either beet juice or sugar cane to create a final product that is also a combination of glucose and fructose, in roughly similar proportions to high-fructose corn syrup. While there have been some studies that show people metabolize high-fructose corn syrup and table sugar differently, the FDA says that has no real bearing on the safety of either sweetener. Eating too much of either type of sugar isn't wise. In either case it's important to exercise moderation. The best approach is to cut down on all added sugars by avoiding sugary drinks and limiting desserts and sugary snacks. by Hope Ricciotti, M.D., and Hye-Chun Hur, M.D., M.P.H. Editors in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Find the best treatments and procedures for you Explore options for better nutrition and exercise I'd like to r Continue reading >>

Added Fructose Is A Principal Driver Of Type 2 Diabetes, Experts Argue

Added Fructose Is A Principal Driver Of Type 2 Diabetes, Experts Argue

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Added fructose is a principal driver of type 2 diabetes, experts argue Recent studies have shown that added sugars, particularly those containing fructose, are a principal driver of diabetes and pre-diabetes, even more so than other carbohydrates. Clinical experts challenge current dietary guidelines that allow up to 25 percent of total daily calories as added sugars, and propose drastic reductions in the amount of added sugar, and especially added fructose, people consume. Recent studies have shown that added sugars, particularly those containing fructose, are a principal driver of diabetes and pre-diabetes, even more so than other carbohydrates. Recent studies have shown that added sugars, particularly those containing fructose, are a principal driver of diabetes and pre-diabetes, even more so than other carbohydrates. Recent studies have shown that added sugars, particularly those containing fructose, are a principal driver of diabetes and pre-diabetes, even more so than other carbohydrates. Clinical experts writing in Mayo Clinic Proceedings challenge current dietary guidelines that allow up to 25% of total daily calories as added sugars, and propose drastic reductions in the amount of added sugar, and especially added fructose, people consume. Worldwide, approximately one in ten adults has type 2 diabetes, with the number of individuals afflicted by the disease across the globe more than doubling from 153 million in 1980 to 347 million in 2008. In the United States, 29 million adults (one in eleven) have type 2 diabetes and another 86 million (more than one in three) have pre-diabetes. "At current levels, added-sugar consumption, and added-fructose consumption in particular, are fueling Continue reading >>

Sugar Vs. High-fructose Corn Syrup: Is One Sweetener Worse For Your Health?

Sugar Vs. High-fructose Corn Syrup: Is One Sweetener Worse For Your Health?

High-fructose corn syrup has long been portrayed as a major villain in the American diet. But a new school of thought contends that plain old table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just as harmful to a person's health. Any source of excess sugar contributes to obesity and diabetes, and singling out high-fructose corn syrup might distract consumers from the real health hazards posed by any and all added sugars, many dietitians now say. For example, people swigging all-natural sodas sweetened with pure cane sugar are still doing themselves harm, just as if the sodas had been loaded instead with high-fructose corn syrup, said Mario Kratz, a research associate professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. "The science is pretty clear that normal household sugar doesn't differ from high-fructose corn syrup," said Kratz, who specializes in nutrition and metabolism. "They are equally bad when consumed in sugar-sweetened beverages." Some researchers, such as Shreela Sharma, maintain that high-fructose corn syrup poses a unique health threat. They are concerned that the human body may process high-fructose corn syrup differently than regular sugar, in a way that contributes to obesity and its attendant problems, such as diabetes and heart disease. "In the end, sugar is sugar when it comes to calories, but it's not the same when your body is metabolizing these different sugars," said Sharma, a registered dietitian and associate professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. "To me, these small differences ultimately do end up making a big difference." But such views are now being challenged by other researchers and nutritionists who say that all sugars used in food are pretty much the same. High-fructose corn syrup i Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes: What The Experts Say

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes: What The Experts Say

High-Fructose Corn Syrup and Diabetes: What the Experts Say (NaturalNews) According to the Corn Refiners Association, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is no worse for you than any other dietary carbohydrate. Many health experts, however, disagree, warning consumers that HFCS is strongly correlated with diabetes and obesity. Today, we bring you selected quotes about HFCS and obesity from noted natural health authors. Feel free to quote these in your own work provided you give proper credit to both the original author quoted here and this NaturalNews page. Roughly $40 billion in federal subsidies are going to pay corn growers, so that corn syrup is able to replace cane sugar. corn syrup has been singled out by many health experts as one of the chief culprits of rising obesity, because corn syrup does not turn off appetite. Since the advent of corn syrup, consumption of all sweeteners has soared, as have people's weights. According to a 2004 study reported in the American journal of Clinical Nutrition, the rise of Type-2 diabetes since 1980 has closely paralleled the increased use of sweeteners, particularly corn syrup. Since the fructose in corn syrup does neither stimulate insulin secretion nor reduce the hunger hormone ghrelin, you will continue to feel hungry while the body converts the fructose into fat. The resulting obesity increases the risk of diabetes and other diseases. Since you obviously cannot expect to receive much help from those who only know how to treat the effects of illness and not its causes, you may need to take your health into you own hands. More than half of the carbohydrates being consumed are in the form of sugars (sucrose, corn syrup, etc.) being added to foods as sweetening agents. High consumption of refined sugars is linked to many chronic d Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup Converts Sugar To Fat 18% Faster!

High Fructose Corn Syrup Converts Sugar To Fat 18% Faster!

The average American eats 94 grams, or over 19 teaspoons, of sugar a day. Thats over 6,935 teaspoons or 143 cups a year. In other words, were drowning in the sweet stuff. Even worse, much of that sugar is highly processed, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) weve been warning you about for years. Corn syrup is 20 percent sweeter than raw sugar, and cheaper to buy. Which makes it the sweetener of choice for many food and drink manufacturers. In fact, experts say 75 percent of packaged foods have HFCS hidden in them. The corn refiners association, aided by mainstream media, has been pushing the sugar is sugar message for years. But as weve explained many times before, your body doesnt process all sugars the same. High fructose corn syrup converts sugar to fat 18% faster! Your liver metabolizes about 20 percent of glucose, with the remaining 80 percent metabolized throughout your body. But fructose, on the other hand, slams your liver, with around 90 percent processed by the overworked organ. As a result, fructose converts to fat far faster than glucose would. Over 18 percent faster, to be exact. But thats not where the problem with high fructose corn syrup ends. Experts say that unlike other types of sugar, your brain doesnt metabolize fructose. In fact, according to Dr. Tyree Winters it has NO nutritional value at all. So your body quickly converts it to fat, but it never gets the signal that youve eaten and are satisfied. The result? You still feel famished and end up eating even more. Just about every major disease epidemic were now facing as a nation has our sugar addiction to blame, at least in part. Heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and even cancer are linked to how much processed sugar were eating. Of course, its not news that eating a ton o Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes | Hfcs Diabetes

High Fructose Corn Syrup And Diabetes | Hfcs Diabetes

Fact: Diabetes is an Epidemic, but HFCS is Not the Cause. Diabetes is a major public health concern, however, there is overwhelming scientific evidence and agreement in the scientific community that HFCS is not a unique cause of either diabetes or obesity. This fact has been supported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the American Diabetes Association who state that the primary causes of diabetes are obesity, advancing age and heredity.1,2 As Diabetes Goes Up, Consumption of HFCS Goes Down In fact, while per capita HFCS consumption has been declining in recent years, the incidence of obesity and diabetes in the U.S. remains on the rise.3 In addition, many parts of the world, including Australia, Chile and the Middle East, have rising rates of diabetes and obesity despite having little or no HFCS in their foods and beverages.4,5 Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce enough insulin or use insulin, resulting in high blood glucose levels. Insulin allows the carbohydrates in foods to be used by the body for energy. Carbohydrates come in both simple (sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, fructose in fruit, lactose in milk) and complex (starch as in flour, bread, cereal, rice, pasta) sources. All complex carbohydrates are broken down or converted into glucose, the primary sugar the body uses for energy. Its important for diabetics to watch their diets and closely monitor their intake of sugar, in all its forms. 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Basics about Diabetes, 2. American Diabetes Association, Diabetes Myths, 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011. 4. World Health Organization, Global Database on Body Mass Index, Country comparison BMI adults % obese (>=30.0), Most recent, See also World H Continue reading >>

Soda Warning? New Study Supports Link Between Diabetes, High-fructose Corn Syrup

Soda Warning? New Study Supports Link Between Diabetes, High-fructose Corn Syrup

Soda Warning? New Study Supports Link Between Diabetes, High-fructose Corn Syrup Credit: Credit: American Chemical Society New evidence suggests that sodas sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup may increase the risk of diabetes, particularly in children. 234th American Chemical Society National Meeting Newswise Researchers have found new evidence that soft drinks sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) may contribute to the development of diabetes, particularly in children. In a laboratory study of commonly consumed carbonated beverages, the scientists found that drinks containing the syrup had high levels of reactive compounds that have been shown by others to have the potential to trigger cell and tissue damage that could cause the disease, which is at epidemic levels. They reported here today at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society. HFCS is a sweetener found in many foods and beverages, including non-diet soda pop, baked goods, and condiments. It is has become the sweetener of choice for many food manufacturers because it is considered more economical, sweeter and more easy to blend into beverages than table sugar. Some researchers have suggested that high-fructose corn syrup may contribute to an increased risk of diabetes as well as obesity, a claim which the food industry disputes. Until now, little laboratory evidence has been available on the topic. In the current study, Chi-Tang Ho, Ph.D., conducted chemical tests among 11 different carbonated soft drinks containing HFCS. He found 'astonishingly high' levels of reactive carbonyls in those beverages. These undesirable and highly-reactive compounds associated with "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules are believed to cause tissue damage, says Ho, a professor of food science at R Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption Linked With Type 2 Diabetes Prevalence

High Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption Linked With Type 2 Diabetes Prevalence

Researchers have found an association between consumption of high fructose corn syrup and the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the journal Global Public Health. Researchers from the University of Oxford and the University of Southern California found, specifically, that the Type 2 diabetes prevalence was 20 percent higher in countries where the food supplies contained HFCS. Type 2 diabetes prevalence in countries where the food supply included more HFCS was 8 percent, while it was 6.7 percent in countries where HFCS is not included in the food supply. High-fructose corn syrup is a kind of sugar, and is used as a sweetener in many foods including soda and candy. (For more on what high fructose corn syrup is, and its potential health effects, click here.) “The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates HFCS consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar,” study researcher Michael I. Goran, a professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, said in a statement. Goran is also the director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center and the co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at USC. However, Marion Nestle, an expert in food policy and a professor at New York University, cautioned that the study doesn’t show that diabetes is caused by consumption of high-fructose corn syrup. She told the New York Times that “I think it’s a stretch to say the study shows high-fructose corn syrup has anything special to do with diabetes,” and that “diabetes is a function of development. The more cars, more TVs, more cellphones, more sugar, more meat, more fat, more calories, more obesity, the more diabetes you ha Continue reading >>

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