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High Fasting Glucose

High Fasting Glucose?? Advice?

High Fasting Glucose?? Advice?

34 year old male. 5'7" 200lbs athletic but also fat. Worked as a cop in a stressful urban area for 7 years, 5 years of overnights from 8pm to 8am (where I really starts getting messed up). Diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease and Vitamin D deficiency (3ng/mL). Started supplementation and Armour thyroid and feel better. I had a routine blood check a few years ago and doc mentioned that my A1C was a little higher than normal and to keep an eye on it and my diet. Doc retired. Recently started listening to Paleo Diet Robb Wolf's podcast. He mentions lots of dietary stuff that resonates with me. I'm pretty sure I have a gluten issue, but need to figure out how to figure that out lol. ANYHOW... I bought a cheap walmart relion tester and a bunch of strips. i've been checking my fasting blood work for a week or so. It's usually between 100 to 120 in the morning. I have a butter and heavy cream coffee and it usually stays about the same. I have a hashbrown and eggs breakfast and its drops into the 90s one our after and upper 80s two hours after. I don't understand it. So I went crazy and ate 4 potatoes one morning with eggs and ketchup. went from fasting of 120 to 88 one hour after meal. I've never been able to push it above 120 one or two hours after anything I eat.... even pancakes with a crazy amount of syrup. or even 4 full size candy bars. So why are my fasted levels so high? I've been considering fasting to try to drop some weight... but if my levels are without food then wouldn't that be more "damaging"? I usually try to eat lower carb and just assumed that carbs shot my sugars up. I've tried keto a few months and like it, but usually fall off wagon. Any advice appreciated, and sorry for the stream of consciousness here. I suggest you find a new doctor and get a standard b Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Is Predicted By The High Fasting Insulin-to-glucose Ratio

Glucose Intolerance Is Predicted By The High Fasting Insulin-to-glucose Ratio

F. Guerrero-Romero [ et 2], M. Rodríguez-Morán [ et 3] To determine whether impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is predicted by high Fasting Insulin-to-Glucose (FIG) ratio and to establish its correlation with insulin resistance and fasting insulin. A population-based three-year follow-up study was performed. The target population consisted of healthy volunteers, men and non-pregnant women aged 30 years or over. Participants were required to have normal referenced ranges of OGTT and blood pressure. Previous diagnosis of chronic diseases was an exclusion criterion. At baseline and at the 3-yr of follow-up, an OGTT was performed. The ratio of serum Fasting Insulin ( mUI/ml)/Fasting Glucose (mg/dl) was used to calculate the FIG ratio. Insulin action and secretion were estimated by HOMA and Insulinogenic index, respectively. The FIG ratio was directly correlated with the HOMA index (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) and fasting insulin (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that IGT was more likely to develop in subjects with high FIG ratio (RR 5.01; CI 95 % 1.9-12.2, p = 0.02), high HOMA index (RR 6.1; CI 95 % 2.1-11.1, p = 0.01), and fasting hyperinsulinemia (RR 4.7 CI 95 % 2.7-13.2, p < 0.05). The cutoff point of FIG ratio for determining the risk of developing IGT was 0.25 ± 0.05. The FIG ratio could be a reliable alternative for the screening of apparently healthy subjects in high risk groups. Déterminer si l'intolérance au glucose (IGT) est prédite par un rapport Insulinémie/glycémie à jeun (FIG) élevé et établir sa corrélation avec l'insulinorésistance et l'insulinémie à jeun. Une étude de suivi sur 3 ans d'un échantillon de population a été conduite. La population cible consistait en volontaires sains, hommes et femmes non enceint Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

This factsheet is for people whose blood test has shown a marginally high fasting glucose (blood sugar) level or who would like information about impaired fasting glycaemia. Impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) means that your body isn't able to regulate glucose as efficiently as it should. About impaired fasting glycaemia Complications Causes Diagnosis Treatment Further information Sources Related topics About impaired fasting glycaemia Glucose enters the blood from your intestines, where it's absorbed from food and drinks as a natural part of digestion. When glucose reaches your body tissues, such as muscle, it's made available to cells where it is needed for energy by the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the level of glucose in the blood so that it doesn't go too high or too low. What is the normal range for blood glucose? Blood glucose concentrations change throughout the day. They are typically higher after eating and lower during fasting. A fasting blood glucose level lower than 6mmol/l is normal. A fasting blood glucose of 7mmol/l or higher may indicate diabetes. Diabetes is a long-term condition where the body is not able to control the amount of glucose in the blood. If your fasting blood glucose level is below 7mmol/l but above 6mmol/l you may have IFG or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG and IGT are not diabetes but suggest that your body is not converting glucose to energy as efficiently as it should. For the range of blood glucose concentrations associated with IFG, see Diagnosis. Complications Some people with IFG will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Others may develop diabetes only if they don't take steps to reduce the chances of this happening (see Self-help). Diabetes is 10 to 20 times more likely in those with IGT or IFG. Since IFG can be an early Continue reading >>

High Fasting Glucose Levels As A Predictor Of Worse Clinical Outcome In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Results From The Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention (bip) Study.

High Fasting Glucose Levels As A Predictor Of Worse Clinical Outcome In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Results From The Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention (bip) Study.

Clinical Pharmacology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel. [email protected] A high fasting glucose level may be a marker not only for microvascular complications, but also for macrovascular complications. We evaluated the clinical significance of a high fasting glucose level (> or =110 mg/dL), detected either at baseline or during follow-up, in the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention (BIP) study. The BIP study was a secondary prevention prospective double-blind study comparing bezafibrate to placebo. A total of 3122 patients with documented coronary artery heart disease who were aged 45 to 74 years and had a total cholesterol level between 180 and 250 mg/dL, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level < or =180 mg/dL, a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level < or =45 mg/dL, a triglyceride level < or =300 mg/dL, and a fasting glucose < or =160 mg/dL were randomized to receive 400 mg of bezafibrate daily or placebo. The primary end point of the BIP study was fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or sudden death. Secondary end points included hospitalization for unstable angina, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting. At baseline, 330 patients (11%) had diabetes mellitus, and 293 patients (9%) had an impaired fasting blood glucose level (IFG). During 6.2 years of follow-up, diabetes mellitus developed in 186 patients (6%), IFG developed in 366 patients (12%), and 62% of patients remained with normal fasting glucose levels (NFG). Patients with diabetes mellitus and IFG both at baseline or developing during follow-up had a significantly higher rate of secondary end points than paients with NFG (P <.0001). Bezafibrate treatment reduced secondary end points only in patients with NFG (P =.04). Continue reading >>

Raised Fasting Blood Glucose

Raised Fasting Blood Glucose

Raised blood glucose was estimated to result in 3.4 million deaths in 2004, equivalent to 5.8% of all deaths. Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glycaemia are risk categories for future development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In some age groups, people with diabetes have a twofold increase in the risk of stroke. Diabetes is the leading cause of renal failure in many populations in both developed and developing countries. Lower limb amputations are at least 10 times more common in people with diabetes than in non-diabetic individuals in developed countries; more than half of all non-traumatic lower limb amputations are due to diabetes. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness in developed countries. People with diabetes require at least 2-3 times the health care resources compared to people who do not have diabetes, and diabetes care may account for up to 15% of national healthcare budgets. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia depends on the diagnostic criteria used in epidemiological surveys. Defined as a fasting plasma glucose value ≥ 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) or on medication for raised blood glucose), the global prevalence of diabetes in 2008 was estimated to be 9%. There was little variation in prevalence rates across WHO regions. The prevalence of diabetes was highest in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (11% for both sexes) and lowest in the WHO European Region (7% for both sexes). The magnitude of diabetes and other abnormalities of glucose tolerance will be considerably higher than the above estimates if the categories of "impaired fasting" and "impaired glucose tolerance" are included. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia may be described as an excess of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Your endocrine system regulates the amount of sugar that is stored and used for energy. It is important in brain cell function, and energy levels. Since the sugar that you consume in your diet is either used or stored, certain conditions and disorders may cause you to have difficulty processing and storing blood glucose, resulting in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. One hormone that is important to the normal storing and processing of sugar is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas that is responsible for maintaining "normal" blood sugar levels. If you have a problem with your pancreas, then you may have increased blood sugar levels. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels higher than these might indicate hyperglycemia. Causes of Hyperglycemia: Diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes, have diabetes of adult onset (Diabetes type 2). You are more at risk for developing diabetes if you are older, extremely overweight (obese), if you have a family history of diabetes (parents, siblings), and if you are of African-American, Hispanic American, or Native-American heritage. People who have diabetes have an underproduction of the hormone, insulin, which lowers your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will have problems with elevated blood sugar levels. If you develop diabetes type 2, and you are an adult, your healthcare provider may prescribe medications in a pill form, which allow your body to process insulin that is needed for maintaining "normal" blood glucose levels. It is likely that your pancreas is producing enough insulin, but your body is resistant to the insulin, a Continue reading >>

Normal Fasting Glucose With High Hba1c

Normal Fasting Glucose With High Hba1c

Jonathan's fasting glucose: 85 mg/dl Jonathan's high HbA1c reflects blood glucose fluctuations over the preceding 60-90 days and can be used to calculate an estimated average glucose (eAG) with the following equation: (For glucose in mmol/L, the equation is eAG = 1.59 × A1C - 2.59) Jonathan's HbA1c therefore equates to an eAG of 145.59 mg/dl--yet his fasting glucose value is 85 mg/dl. This is a common situation: Normal fasting glucose, high HbA1c. It comes from high postprandial glucose values, high values after meals. It suggests that, despite having normal glucose while fasting, Jonathan experiences high postprandial glucose values after many or most of his meals. After a breakfast of oatmeal, for instance, he likely has a blood glucose of 150 mg/dl or greater. After breakfast cereal, blood glucose likely exceeds 180 mg/dl. With two slices of whole wheat bread, glucose likewise likely runs 150-180 mg/dl. The best measure of all is a postprandial glucose one hour after the completion of a meal, a measure you can easily obtain yourself with a home glucose meter. Second best: fasting glucose with HbA1c. Gain control over this phenomenon and you 1) reduce fasting blood sugar, 2) reduce expression of small LDL particles, and 3) lose weight. Continue reading >>

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles. Young men with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range appear to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially if they are on the heavy side and have high serum triglyceride levels. That’s the finding of researchers who studied more than 13,000 apparently healthy young men in the Israeli defense forces. The investigators found that so-called "normal" test values may actually predict type 2 diabetes. "Higher fasting plasma glucose levels within the normoglycemic range constitute an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes among young men, and such levels may help, along with body-mass index and triglyceride levels, to identify apparently healthy men at increased risk for diabetes," wrote Amir Tirosh, M.D., Ph.D., from the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps and colleagues at various Israeli institutions. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels below 100 mg/dL (5.55 mmol/L) are considered to be normal, whereas levels between 100 mg/dL and 109 mg/dL signal impairment. But readings at the upper end of the normal limit – just below the 100 mg/dL threshold – might signal risk for future diabetes, and could serve as a risk marker. To see how things stood with glucose among young Israeli adults, they drew on data from the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults study, which tracks all Israeli service personnel older than 25. Participants fill out a detailed demographic, nutrition, lifestyle and medical questionnaire, and have blood samples drawn after a 14-hour fast. The study included data on 13,163 Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting blood sugar provides vital clues about how the body is managing blood sugar levels. Blood sugar tends to peak about an hour after eating, and declines after that. High fasting blood sugar levels point to insulin resistance or diabetes. Abnormally low fasting blood sugar could be due to diabetes medications. Knowing when to test and what to look for can help keep people with, or at risk of, diabetes healthy. What are fasting blood sugar levels? Following a meal, blood sugar levels rise, usually peaking about an hour after eating. How much blood sugar rises by and the precise timing of the peak depends on diet. Large meals tend to trigger larger blood sugar rises. High-sugar carbohydrates, such as bread and sweetened snacks, also cause more significant blood sugar swings. Normally, as blood sugar rises, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar, breaking it down so that the body can use it for energy or store it for later. However, people who have diabetes have difficulties with insulin in the following ways: People with type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin because the body attacks insulin-producing cells. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well to insulin and, later, may not make enough insulin. In both cases, the result is the same: elevated blood sugar levels and difficulties using sugar. This means that fasting blood sugar depends on three factors: the contents of the last meal the size of the last meal the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin Blood sugar levels in between meals offer a window into how the body manages sugar. High levels of fasting blood sugar suggest that the body has been unable to lower the levels of sugar in the blood. This points to either insulin resistance or inadequate insulin production, an Continue reading >>

Low-carb Lab Testing – Part 1 – Blood Sugar Tests

Low-carb Lab Testing – Part 1 – Blood Sugar Tests

Welcome to part 1 of our series on low-carb lab testing, where we’ll look at common blood sugar test options and how to interpret and track your results. In these posts we’ll dig into the most common lab tests one will encounter on their low-carb journey. Our goal is to educate you on what these tests mean so you can be better informed as you work to optimize your health. In this first post, we look at three tests that can be used to monitor your blood glucose levels. In subsequent posts, we’ll shift focus to insulin, lipids, thyroid and other markers that are important for patients to understand. Heads Up Health was designed to help you centralize and track all of your vital health data in one place, including important lab test results, so you can make informed and empowered decisions about your health. To get started, simply click on the button below to create your account. Or, read on for more information about common tests to help you monitor your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar, insulin and health Chronic, long term pathological elevations in blood glucose or insulin have been linked to type 2 diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer’s disease, kidney problems, deterioration of eyesight, neuropathy, poor prognosis in cancer, connective tissue irregularities, orthopedic injuries and more. Links and associations are not necessarily causal relationships, but the medical literature is robust with research detailing potential mechanisms by which chronically high blood glucose or insulin might be either directly causing or at the very least exacerbating these outcomes. With this in mind, if you’re concerned about your long term health and quality of life, keeping blood glucose and insulin within healthy ranges is one of the most important and effective things you can do. Continue reading >>

How To Fix High Morning Blood Sugars (dawn Phenomenon)

How To Fix High Morning Blood Sugars (dawn Phenomenon)

There are various possible causes of a high blood sugar level in the morning: The Dawn Phenomenon which is a natural rise in blood sugar due to a surge of hormones secreted at night which trigger your liver to dump sugar into your blood to help prepare you for the day. Having high blood sugar from the night before which continue through the night into the morning. Reactive hyperglycemia which is also called the Somogyi Effect. This is when a low blood sugar in the middle of the night triggers your liver to dump sugar into your blood in an attempt to stabilize your blood sugar. Why Are My Blood Sugars High in the Morning? There is a simple strategy for diagnosing the source of high blood sugars in the morning. Test your blood sugar before bed. Test your blood sugar in the middle of the night. Test your blood sugar in the morning. It takes a little bit of effort, but you only need to do it a few times to diagnose the issue. TheSomogyi Effect is less common than the Dawn Phenomenon, according to an article published by The Polish Journal of Endocrinology. To diagnose either of these phenomena, scientists recommend checking blood sugar levels for several nights specifically between 3 a.m and 5 a.m. or using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM). Many healthcare practitioners are now offering the use of a loan CGM for a few days which can be helpful to observe nighttime blood sugar activity. How to Fix High Blood Sugars in the Morning The Dawn Phenomenon refers to a surge of hormones excreted by your body in the early morning hours. These hormones rise each night around the same time to prepare your body to wake. Basically, your body is starting the engine, releasing some fuel, and prepping to go for the day. The Dawn Phenomenon occurs in all humans regardless of whet Continue reading >>

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