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High Fasting Blood Sugar Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes After Delivery

Gestational Diabetes After Delivery

Short-term management and long-term risks After the intensified treatment often required for treating gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), clinicians may be tempted to relax after delivery of the baby. If it is assumed that no further management is needed, an excellent opportunity to improve the future health status of these high-risk women may be lost. There are special concerns for the early postpartum care of women with GDM. Encouragement and facilitation of exclusive breastfeeding is very important because of the profound short-term as well as long-term health benefits to the infant and the reduced risks for subsequent obesity and glucose intolerance demonstrated in many breastfeeding women. A method of contraception should be chosen that does not increase the risk of glucose intolerance in the mother. Some women with GDM will have persisting hyperglycemia in the days after delivery that will justify medical management for diabetes and perhaps for hypertension, microalbuminuria, and dyslipidemia. Treatment should be maintained according to the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association and other relevant organizations and adjusted for the needs of lactation. Treatment should be continued in adequate fashion to minimize risks to the early conceptus if there is a subsequent planned or unplanned pregnancy. Most women with GDM will not have severe hyperglycemia after delivery. This group should be followed for at least 6–12 weeks to determine their glucose status. Many studies over 3 decades on all continents of the globe demonstrate the high risk of subsequent diabetes in this female population. The degree of this risk is best assessed by glucose tolerance testing. Randomized controlled trials have proven that several interventions (diet and planned exercise 30â Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels

High Fasting Levels

High fasting levels are a huge problem for many ladies. Fasting blood sugar levels, levels taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, are the hardest thing to control with gestational diabetes. But why is that? When we're sleeping we are not eating and drinking and we are not active and so the body is left to it's own devices with regards to controlling blood sugar levels. Impacts on fasting blood sugar levels Many things can impact fasting levels: what you've eaten earlier in the evening when you last ate hydration levels how well you've slept the dawn phenomenon the Somogyi effect What you ate earlier in the evening Bearing in mind how much of each food group converts to glucose in the bloodstream and the time taken, your fasting levels may be impacted by this. Too much carbohydrate in your evening meal or as a snack before bed can contribute to high fasting levels, as your body can only produce or use so much insulin, so if you raise your blood sugars too high by eating too much carbohydrate, your body can spend the night battling to try to lower your blood sugar levels. A high fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels and so eating a well paired evening meal is important. When you last ate The key to stabilising blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Hydration levels Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body and so it is important to stay well h Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Fasting Blood Sugar 105-110

Gestational Diabetes Fasting Blood Sugar 105-110

If you’re diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD), it’s very important to keep your blood glucose (sugar) level within the target range. You may need to check it several times a day – typically before meal (fasting) and after meal. Fasting blood sugar 105 and 110 mg /dL are commonly considered abnormal. These high levels are still too dangerous for pregnancy. The good news, GD is controllable and you can still have a healthy pregnancy. Brief summary about gestational diabetes As the name suggests, it occurs during pregnancy – and it’s only found in pregnancy. You cannot get rid of it during pregnancy, but again it’s treatable! And it usually goes away on its own after giving birth. Like diabetes mellitus, in GD the body also loses its natural ability to use glucose (sugar) for energy as effectively as usual. What is the exact cause? The answer is not fully known yet. But there are some explanations. The increased pregnancy hormones, especially in late pregnancy, are often to blame. The placenta is essential part of pregnancy. It is responsible to stimulate and produce essential hormones for baby development and growth during pregnancy. But some of these hormones can interrupt with the mother’s insulin that may cause a condition called insulin resistance (when insulin doesn’t work as effectively as usual). The demand for insulin can significantly increase during pregnancy, could be 2-3 times greater than normal. In some pregnancies, the body fails to make enough insulin, and GD may develop. Insulin is essential hormone that plays a key role in your glucose metabolism. It is produced by pancreas. With insulin, glucose in the blood can be effectively absorbed by cells of the body for energy. And if there something goes awry with insulin, the body will lose Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop high blood sugar levels. This condition is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM typically develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s estimated to occur in up to 9.2 percent of pregnancies. If you develop GDM while you’re pregnant, it doesn’t mean that you had diabetes before your pregnancy or will have it afterward. But GDM does raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. If poorly managed, it can also raise your child’s risk of developing diabetes and add other risk factors to you and your baby during pregnancy and delivery. It’s rare for GDM to cause symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, they will likely be mild. They may include: fatigue blurred vision excessive thirst excessive need to urinate The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but hormones likely play a role. When you’re pregnant, your body produces larger amounts of some hormones, including: human placental lactogen estrogen hormones that increase insulin resistance These hormones affect your placenta and help sustain your pregnancy. Over time, the amount of these hormones in your body increases. They may interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Insulin helps move glucose out of your blood into cells, where it’s used for energy. If you don’t have enough insulin, or you have high levels of hormones that prevent insulin from working properly, your blood glucose levels may rise. This can cause GDM. You’re at higher risk of developing GDM if you: are over the age of 25 have high blood pressure have a family history of diabetes were overweight before you became pregnant have previously given birth to a baby weighin Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

What Should I Know About High Fasting Blood Glucose Levels With Diabetes?

What Should I Know About High Fasting Blood Glucose Levels With Diabetes?

In general the goal for all of us, including those with diabetes is to try keep our fasting blood sugar stable at 100 or below. 1.) The A1C test which reflects your average blood sugar levels over the last 3 months. Usually, fasting blood glucose levels of: Hemaglobin A1C or A1C numbers that your health provider can measure are usually as follows: One specific pattern of glucose fluctuations needs special consideration: high fasting blood glucose values. It seems perfectly logical for blood sugar levels to rise after eating, but many people are surprised to find that they have higher glucose levels when they get up than they do before other meals of the day, such as dinner. Higher blood sugar levels in the morning mean that you have less insulin action in your body overnight. We often see this in people treated with medications such as the sulfonylureas, which are more effective at promoting insulin release following eating than during prolonged fasting. In addition, there are two special conditions that may raise fasting glucose levels. The first is called the dawn phenomenon, which results from an increase in certain hormones in the body, especially the stress hormone cortisol, beginning at three or four o'clock in the morning. Cortisol increases insulin resistance, often causing a rise in blood sugar values. The other problem is called the Somogyi effect. This refers to a blood sugar level that rises in the early morning after the person experiences an unrecognized hypoglycemic event during the night. High morning glucose values should prompt some testing at bedtime and then a few tests at 2 or 3 A.M., just to rule out nocturnal hypoglycemia. Clues to nighttime hypoglycemia include fitful sleep, nightmares, or awakening drenched in sweat. The Best Life Guide to Manag Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Questions Just diagnosed with gestational diabetes Got a diagnosis of gestational diabetes My doc recommended the Sweet Success program at Alta Bates Cesarean vs induction w/gestational diabetes Related Pages More advice about Diabetes More advice about Pregnancy I was just diagnosed with gestational diabetes with baby number two. I am twenty- six weeks pregnant - age 40. After a little over a week on the diet/exercise plan I am doing well controlling my numbers with the exception of my waking/fasting test. I am supposed to be under 95 and am consistently above 95, typically between 105 and 115. I am wondering if anyone had used acupuncture to help with this condition. Also, I would love to hear from members who were successful at controlling their numbers with diet. We had planned a home birth with a very experienced midwife prior to this diagnosis. I would love to hear from anyone who has had a home birth after being diagnosed with GD. My WC Kaiser doctor says she never recommends HB so I am not sure how much help she will be in determining the best plan. Thanks. Anon I had the same problem when I was pregnant with my first child. I could control my blood sugar, but that fasting one was always too high. I didn't have a home birth, but considered one and was told it was fine as long as I didn't have to go on insulin. I found with my fasting b.s. that it was very effected by what I ate the day before, even if my blood sugar right after eating didn't seem to be. So, I was able to get my fasting down by really cutting down on carbs and sugars and bulking up on protein. I would eat small portions of brown rice and quinoa and a little fruit, but that was it. I ate beans, which actually help to regulate blood sugar. I also found if I went for a walk right before bed my numbe Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Whether you had diabetes before you got pregnant or you developed diabetes during your pregnancy, you'll need to keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels. Tight control will help you avoid complications and long-term health problems for both you and your baby. You're eating differently because your body needs more energy to help your baby grow and be healthy. And your changing hormones affect how your body makes and uses insulin. In the later parts of your pregnancy, you may become more insulin resistant, so blood sugar builds up to higher levels. How often should you check your blood sugar? Pre-existing diabetes: Before and after meals and before bedtime If you are pregnant and have type 1 diabetes, your doctor might sometimes ask you to check your blood sugar in the middle of the night, around 3 a.m. You should check your fasting urine ketones every day, too. For every type of diabetes, if you're pregant you need to see your doctor at least once a month, perhaps as often as once a week. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Causes Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy complications, and it affects between 2 to 10 percent of all pregnancies. This condition is characterized by high blood sugar that starts ( or is first diagnosed) during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes typically goes away after your baby is born. However, over 50 percent of women who experience gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. To understand how gestational diabetes develops, you have to understand a few basic principles of how your endocrine system works. When you eat, most of your food breaks down into a type of sugar called glucose, which enters your bloodstream. Insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas) opens your cells so they can use glucose as energy. When you're pregnant, the hormones produced by the placenta inhibits the effects of insulin. As a result, your cells aren't able to respond to insulin as well as they did previously. To compensate for this resistance to insulin, a healthy woman's pancreas will respond by secreting more insulin. You may actually require three times the normal amount of insulin to support a healthy pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs when your pancreas can't keep up with the increased insulin demand. When you don't have enough insulin, blood glucose can't leave your bloodstream and be changed into energy. As a result, glucose rises to high levels in your blood – which causes gestational diabetes. Untreated Gestational Diabetes and Your Baby Gestational diabetes usually doesn't begin until the middle half of pregnancy – often around 20 to 24 weeks pregnant. At this stage of pregnancy, your baby's body has already been formed. Because of this fact, gestational diabetes doesn't cause the type of birth defect Continue reading >>

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