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High Blood Sugar Morning

Why Is My Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is My Sugar High In The Morning?

It can be very frustrating to check your blood sugar and find it is always high in the morning. Diabetes is a complicated condition. There are many different factors that contribute to worsening blood sugars, including diet, hormones, exercise and genetics. A high blood sugar in the early morning can be caused by several things. The common ones will be covered below. Insulin resistance in the liver: The two main hormones involved in blood sugar control and regulation are Insulin and Glucagon. Insulin pushes sugar into the cell, so it can be used or stored. Glucagon does the opposite of insulin. It frees sugar from storage in the liver, so the body can use it while you are fasting. A high blood sugar in the morning is one of the earliest changes people with diabetes experience. This is due to insulin resistance in the liver and high glucagon levels, which often occur in people with diabetes. The insulin the pancreas produces does not work well anymore, even though the pancreas is working overtime to produce more of it. Insulin resistance in the liver and elevated glucagon levels causes the liver to spill out extra sugar into the bloodstream while you are sleeping and fasting overnight. This raises your blood sugar levels. The Dawn Phenomenon: In the early morning, it is normal to have higher levels of cortisol and growth hormone. Both of these hormones help prepare you to wake up and start the day. Doctors often call this hormone increase the ‘Dawn phenomenon.’ Dawn phenomenon happens between 2 AM and 8 AM, and it also occurs in patients without diabetes. This natural hormone change helps to keep sugar in the blood while a person is fasting. In patients with diabetes, the Dawn phenomenon is more noticeable because of both insulin resistance and decreased levels of in Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

Why Blood Sugar Levels Rise Overnight

get the scoop When you go to bed, your blood sugar reading is 110, but when you wake up in the morning, it has shot up to 150. Why does this happen? To understand how blood sugar levels can rise overnight without your eating anything, we have to look at where glucose comes from — and where it goes — while we sleep. During the day, the carbohydrates we eat are digested into glucose and absorbed into the bloodstream. Some of this glucose goes to the liver, where it is stored for later use. At night, while we are asleep, the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream. The liver acts as our glucose warehouse and keeps us supplied until we eat breakfast. The amount of glucose being used is matched by the amount of glucose being released by the liver, so blood sugar levels should remain constant. what is the dawn phenomenon? A rise in blood sugar level between approximately 3 A.M. and the time you wake up is called the “dawn phenomenon.” The liver is supposed to release just enough glucose to replace what is being used, and insulin works as the messenger to tell the liver how much is enough. But if there's not enough insulin (as with type 1 diabetes), or if there's enough insulin but it cannot communicate its message to the liver (as with type 2 diabetes), the liver starts to release glucose much too quickly. In addition, levels of hormones such as cortisol begin to increase in the early morning hours, which can contribute to altered insulin sensitivity. The result? Blood sugar levels rise. This is why blood sugar levels can go up between the time you go to bed and the time you wake up. what can you do about it? You might be able to make changes in the timing of your meals, medications, or insulin injections to help prevent dawn phenomenon. First, keep a detailed rec Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Use This Chart To Find Out!

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Use This Chart To Find Out!

One Drop Guide: Why is my blood sugar high in the morning? Whatsone of the most frustrating things to deal with when you have diabetes? Waking up to a high morning blood sugar! You havent eaten, taken insulin, or moved for hours, so whats the deal? Well, there are actually some good explanations for those mysterious morning highs, and some steps you can take to prevent them. Check out the this mobile-friendly One Drop Guide Why is my blood sugar high in the morning? to figure out what the cause might be and what todo about it. Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

At the moment we are following Yvonne (a type 2 diabetic) on a 6-8 week journey to lower her blood sugar, a1c levels and hopefully cholesterol and other health markers. Yvonne has been sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those she always makes some notes for me. I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against one of her morning blood sugar results and then again on another morning when her blood sugar levels were high at 160 (mg/dl – or 8.9mmol/l) she had written: “I don’t understand. 97 (mg/dl – or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn’t eat anything because I didn’t feel well. Humm.” So I thought this would be a good opportunity to provide some information on the question: Why is blood sugar high in the morning?? While you’re here be sure to subscribe for our type 2 diabetes updates Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem like the body would have the lowest blood glucose in the morning this often isn’t the case for these 5 reasons. 1. Glucose Happens 24/7 All the cells in the body need glucose to fuel their function, even when we sleep. So the body breaks down stores in the liver so that the body and brain can continue to go about their functions. This glucose production will still occur when you don’t eat and in fact if you skip a meal it can increase the livers production of glucose. 2. Morning Hormones Raise Blood Glucose Cortisol (our stress hormone) is the hormone that slowly increases in levels from around 3 am onwards to reach it’s peak early in the morning. This occurs to get us moving and to give us energy. But cortisol stimulates a rise in blood sugar response so it is in fact a ‘normal’ response but if you are diabetic there is one factor that impacts both the overnight g Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Four Reasons For Morning High Blood Sugar Levels

Four Reasons For Morning High Blood Sugar Levels

Q: Dr. Stanislaw, why do I go to bed with a good blood sugar reading, but then wake up and it’s too high? A: There are 4 reasons for unexplained high morning blood sugar levels. Having a thorough knowledge of why blood sugar levels do what they do is an essential, yet often lacking, piece to good diabetes care. Morning blood sugars can be especially hard to understand. You go to bed and your blood sugar level is perfect....Ahhh. Then you wake up and it's awful?! What happened?? I’ve had type 1 since I was seven years old. When I was diagnosed in 1980, blood glucose testing didn’t even exist. I had to pee in a cup twice a day and test how much sugar was in it, which only told me if I had been high over the past few hours. There was no way to ever know what my glucose level was in the moment…we’ve come a long way! Being able to know what your glucose level is at any time is a fabulous advancement that allows you to have better care. But more information can lead to new frustrations. Back then, if I woke up and didn’t feel low, all was good. Today, we can know exactly where our level is at anytime and if it’s in good range we’re happy and smiling! But if it’s not, we’re likely frowning and not feeling so hot. So let’s take a look at four reasons why blood sugar can be high in the morning: 1.) Your BACKGROUND MEDICATION is set too low. A perfectly set regimen of oral blood sugar management medications and/or basal/long-acting insulin dose should keep your blood sugar normal throughout the night and allow you to wake up with a normal blood sugar level. However many people with diabetes are not on adequate oral meds and/or do not have a properly set basal insulin dose to allow this to happen. I help my patients figure this out via planning a specific typ Continue reading >>

Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (high Morning Blood Sugar)

Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (high Morning Blood Sugar)

Are your fasting blood sugar levels often higher than when you went to bed? Is high fasting blood sugar with normal PP figures something to worry about? If you are worried about your glucose numbers swinging during sleep or pre-dawn hours, you could be experiencing the Dawn Phenomena. What Is The Dawn Phenomena? When we are asleep, our bodies are tasked with repair, maintenance and growth jobs. Since we are not eating anything during sleep, the body uses glucose from the liver to maintain metabolic functions. In addition to that, there is a surge in growth hormones in the early hours of the dawn between 4 am to 5 am, which makes the liver produce more glucose. Fact is; this is a natural occurrence and happens to all of us. In simpler words, everyone has the dawn phenomenon. The body produces hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine, to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies, and also give us the energy we need to start our day and make it until breakfast. In people who don’t have diabetes, the insulin produced by the body keeps these higher glucose levels in check. However, in diabetics who suffer from insulin resistance or have impaired insulin function, this leads to higher fasting blood sugar levels which normalize only post breakfast. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night. The body has mechanisms to maintain normal basal glucose levels during sleep, so we don’t get hypoglycemia or low blood sugar at night. In patients displaying impaired glucose tolerance, their body is unable to handle the glucose surge at night combined with the insulin suppression. People who do strenuous exercise early in the morning (e.g. weight training) are also more likely to experience Continue reading >>

Understanding Fasting Blood Sugar

Understanding Fasting Blood Sugar

Among the most common questions people have about Type 2 diabetes is this: how can they lower their fasting blood sugar? To answer this question in a way that will help you lower your blood sugar we are going to have to first explain why doctors measure fasting blood sugar and what it does--and does not--tell us about our blood sugar health. WHAT IS FASTING BLOOD SUGAR? Traditionally, fasting blood sugar is the value you get when you test your blood sugar after an 8 hour long fast--which is usually immediately upon waking. In a normal person this fasting blood sugar would also be the "baseline" blood sugar--the level to which blood sugar returns a few hours after every meal all day long. However, for reasons we will discuss later on, this is often NOT the case for people with Type 2 diabetes, whose morning blood sugars may be much higher than the baseline level they achieve after meals for the rest of the day. Doctors have for decades relied on the FPG (fasting plasma glucose) test which measures fasting blood sugar to diagnose diabetes. The reason for this is NOT that FPG test results predict diabetic complications. They don't. Post-meal blood sugar tests are a much better indicator of whether a person will get the classic diabetic complications, and the A1c test is a better indicator of potential heart disease. But the FPG test is cheap and easy to administer, hence its popularity. The value most of us would find much more helpful in assessing our health is not fasting blood sugar but something else: the number of hours a day our blood sugar spends elevated over the level known to cause complications, which is roughly 140 mg/dl (7.7 mmol/L). A person can wake up with a FPG of 130 mg/dl (7.2 mmol/L), but if it drops after breakfast and most hours of the day are spent w Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A: Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much sl Continue reading >>

3 Steps To Lower Your Morning Blood Sugar

3 Steps To Lower Your Morning Blood Sugar

If you're diabetic, you can relate to the blood sugar roller coaster that causes your readings to fluctuate. Have you awoken in the morning, only to find that your readings are abnormally high? If so, you're not alone — here are three ways to potentially combat morning highs. 1. Eat a nutrient-rich breakfast If you are suffering from the "dawn phenomenon," your blood sugar will generally rise between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m. This is your body's natural way of preparing for the day — increasing hormone levels, such as cortisol and adrenaline. As hormone levels rise, blood sugar rises to use as energy. To counteract this effect: Eat a nutritious breakfast to lower cortisol levels, decreasing the release of glycogen. Until you consume nutrients, cortisol levels will remain high, significantly affecting your blood sugar. Focus on breakfast items such as steel-cut oats with unsweetened almond milk, eggs, Greek yogurt, smoothies (made with 75 percent or more low-glycemic vegetables) and nut butter on whole-grain toast. 2. Check your pre-bedtime glucose levels Although the dawn effect is often to blame, there's another phenomenon known as the Somogyi effect. Overnight, your blood sugar drops, and to counteract hypoglycemia, your body releases hormones that increase glucose levels. To counteract this effect: Consume a protein-rich snack before bed, as well as a complex carbohydrate. Some great options include yogurt with 1/2 cup fresh blueberries, cottage cheese with 1/2 cup pineapple or a banana with nuts. If you awake around 2 to 3 a.m., test your blood glucose and record it. Maintaining a blood sugar and diet journal is a great way for your doctor to reassess your changing needs. 3. Understand waning insulin In this case, you may take insulin in the evening, and by the time you Continue reading >>

The Dawn Effect: Tips For Fixing High Morning Blood Sugars

The Dawn Effect: Tips For Fixing High Morning Blood Sugars

An early morning spike in the blood sugar can be a sign of poorly-controlled diabetes or something called the Dawn Effect. Here's what you can do. The dawn phenomenon sometimes called the dawn effect, is the term given to an early morning spike in the fasting blood sugar in an individual with diabetes. Typically occurring between 2 and 8 AM, it can be frustrating for those who are making every effort to control their blood sugar. Fortunately, the dawn phenomenon can be effectively managed. Why it Happens Everyone—those with or without diabetes—experiences a rise in blood sugar in the early morning. “There is a surge in growth hormone secretion in the early morning and this appears to be the hormone that may be the most responsible for the dawn phenomenon, at least in people with type 1 diabetes,” says Robert Courgi, MD, a hospitalist and endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, New York. “The dawn phenomenon is apparently not only responsible for a rise in fasting glucose, but it can also account for an exaggerated rise in post-breakfast blood glucose.” Growth hormone, as well as hormones like cortisol, are “get-up hormones that work to get us started on our day,” explains Yan Yan Sally Xie, MD, an endocrinologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, New York and North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York. “But all these hormones cause glucose levels to rise.” In a person who doesn’t have diabetes, there is sufficient insulin to cope with the blood glucose, or sugar, when it rises, Dr. Courgi says. “But in someone with diabetes, there’s just not enough insulin to control the sugar,” he adds. The pancreas isn’t able to produce insulin as needed, so the blood glucose rises. The Consequences of High Blo Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

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