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High Blood Sugar Fuzzy Head

Got Brain Fog? Here Are Five Possible Reasons Why

Got Brain Fog? Here Are Five Possible Reasons Why

Do you suffer from brain fog? That muggy feeling your brain is operating in a puddle of mud and life is moving in slow motion. People think brain fog is funny or normal, but its not. Its a red flag your brain is inflamed, functioning poorly, and likely degenerating too quickly. What causes brain fog and why should you care? Consider these reasons: 1. Brain cells not communicating well with each other Brain fog happens when brain cells, or neurons, dont communicate well with each other. This causes brain function to slow down and diminish, giving you symptoms of brain fog. Many factors cause neurons to fire sluggishly or not all with each other, which Ill talk about more in this article. When you have brain fog, you have to ask yourself, Why are my neurons not able to fire effectively? Blood sugar that swings too low or too high can cause brain fog. Symptoms of low blood sugar include irritability or lightheadedness between meals, cravings for sweets, waking up at 3 or 4 a.m., dependence on coffee or sugar for energy, becoming upset easily, and forgetfulness. Symptoms of high blood sugar (insulin resistance) include fatigue after meals, constant hunger, cravings for sweets not relieved by eating them, constant thirst, frequent urination, difficulty falling asleep, and a big belly. Blood sugar that is too low or too high means neurons are not receiving the energy they need to function, which often causes brain fog. Unstable blood sugar is commonly caused by eating too many processed carbohydrates and sugary items, skipping meals, or chronic overeating. Quite often relieving symptoms of brain fog can be as easy as stabilizing your blood sugar. Eat a whole foods diet based around vegetables, proteins, and healthy fats. Avoid sweets and processed foods, and keep carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

Recognizing The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Recognizing The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

The signs of hypoglycemia (also known as low blood sugar) are easy to recognize once you become aware of what they are. They are often at the root of many physiological and psychological conditions, syndromes or symptoms, but mainstream medicine fails to recognize its prevalence. Low blood sugar is a very common occurrence in our society, but often goes undiagnosed because of lack of awareness. It can imitate practically every medical condition we know of and is often misdiagnosed or labeled as hypochondriasis. In lay terms, hypoglycemia is when your blood glucose levels drop too low and your body and brain can't function properly. Glucose is one of your body's sources of energy. It is absorbed from the foods you eat and distributed to the cells in your body. The brain is very sensitive to the levels of blood sugar and needs glucose to function adequately. It is fuel for the brain. The brain doesn't have the ability to store glucose so it needs a continuous supply from the blood. It extracts it from the blood as it does oxygen. If the brain does not have enough oxygen or glucose it can result in coma. The first signs of hypoglycemia to occur are often shaking or trembling in between meals, weakness and ravenous hunger. Causes of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs when the body does not metabolize blood glucose properly. Abnormal metabolism can be caused by a variety of factors such as: Excess refined sugar and white flour in your diet Pancreatic or adrenal underactivity or overactivity Excessive use of alcohol, tobacco, and coffee or other products with caffeine Overeating of refined carbohydrates Allergies Severe emotional stress that doesn't go away Overconsumption of starchy carbohydrates like grains and potatoes Genetic polymorphism Probably one of the biggest causes Continue reading >>

Brain Fog After Eating? These Are The Worst Culprits

Brain Fog After Eating? These Are The Worst Culprits

If you experience brain fog after you eat, you need to look at your diet. Follow these steps to uncover the offending foods and clear your fuzzy thinking. What you’ll learn about brain fog after eating in this article: Food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances that cause brain fog How wheat and gluten cause fuzzy thinking How the blood sugar roller coaster contributes to brain fog Food additives that are linked to brain fog How to do an elimination diet to determine the foods you should avoid You’ll eat a meal, but instead of feeling energized you feel exhausted, mentally fuzzy, and you just can’t think. When you experience brain fog after eating, your brain is telling you there’s a problem. Certain foods, additives, an imbalance of macronutrients, or the amount you eat can all be culprits. Finding the answer requires some detective work. Food Allergies Can Cause Brain Fog If you have brain fog after eating a certain food, you may be allergic to it. Here’s a list of the top allergenic foods known as “The Big 8.” (1) dairy eggs fish shellfish wheat soy peanuts tree nuts It can be hard to detect if any of these are the cause of your brain fog since these foods are commonly hidden ingredients. FoodAllergy.org has compiled an extensive list of hidden sources of these and other top food allergens. Go to their food allergens page and select the food in question. You’ll find comprehensive information on foods to avoid, plus lists of unexpected sources. And while this top 8 list accounts for 90% of food allergies, it’s possible to be allergic to any food. (2) Some people are allergic to just one specific meat, fruit, vegetable, seed, and even spice. Food Sensitivities and Intolerances Cause Brain Fog Too You don’t have to be truly allergic to a food fo Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Reduce Brain Fog And Brain Inflammation

4 Steps To Reduce Brain Fog And Brain Inflammation

Unfortunately, even resolutions made with the best intentions lose steam when the brain isn’t working. Brain fog describes the feeling of living in a hazy reality, where you feel disoriented, scattered, and dull. Signs of brain fog include trouble concentrating and forgetfulness. Recurring brain fog may leave you: Feeling groggy or confused Unable to focus With a poor memory Stuttering or stammering when speaking Processing information slowly What Causes Brain Fog? Brain fog can be a common occurrence and a sign of inflammation in the body. You may experience symptoms like confusion, poor memory, difficulty processing information, and an inability to focus. Datis Kharrazian, bestselling author and a leading expert on autoimmune diseases, recently published a book about the brain called Why Isn’t My Brain Working? He explains that brain fog doesn’t just involve the brain. (1) Brain fog is a sign of leaky brain or brain on fire. In other words, brain fog is a sign of inflammation. Inflammation in the brain causes neurons to fire more slowly, slowing down mental acuity, recall, and reflexes. Sluggish neurons also shut down the production of energy in the cells. This means that cells fatigue easily, and you may lose your ability to focus for long periods of time. Dr. Kharrazian explains that the immune system in the brain is composed of cells called microglia. Microglia “turn on” and release inflammatory messages when: There is head trauma. Your blood sugar is unregulated, such as diabetes or insulin resistance. There is poor blood circulation to the brain. There is inflammation outside the brain, such as an inflamed gut. You have a marked sensitivity to environmental pollutants, perfumes, and chemicals. The bad news is that once microglia are activated, they feed Continue reading >>

Brain Fog: Causes, Symptoms, Solutions

Brain Fog: Causes, Symptoms, Solutions

Brain fog includes symptoms of confusion, forgetfulness, and lack of focus and mental clarity. It is avoidable and treatable. Learn what to do about it. Brain fog is not a medically recognized term but is a commonly used phrase that sums up feelings of confusion, forgetfulness, and lack of focus and mental clarity. Having brain fog is fairly common, but it’s not normal. When you feel foggy, unfocused, and like you just can’t think, your brain is sending an important signal that there’s an imbalance in your life that needs to be addressed. The causes of brain fog generally fall into one of two main categories — either it’s lifestyle-related or a side effect of a medical condition or medication. In this article, we’ll be taking an in-depth look at the eight main causes of brain fog. And we’ll give you concrete steps to get your brain back on track quickly. Get started here. Brain Fog Cause #1: You Are Eating the Wrong Foods One of the first things you may think when your brain gets foggy is “Was it something I ate?” And often you’d be right. Here are some of the many ways the food you eat could be behind your fuzzy thinking. Sugar Refined carbohydrates like sugar and high fructose corn syrup send your blood sugar level skyrocketing up, then crashing down. And since your brain uses glucose as its main source of fuel, this puts your brain on a roller coaster ride — first too much, then too little glucose. Low brain glucose leads to brain fog, mood swings, irritability, tiredness, mental confusion, and impaired judgment. Chronically high blood glucose levels lead to insulin resistance and diabetes, both of which have been linked to Alzheimer’s. (1) The average American consumes 156 pounds of added sugar per year. (2) Don’t be one of them! Low-Fat Di Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. When blood sugar levels start to climb in diabetes, a number of body systems are harmed—and that list includes the brain, since studies have linked diabetes with a higher risk of stroke and dementia. Now, a new study published in the journal Neurology reports that changes in blood vessel activity in the brains of diabetics may lead to drops in cognitive functions and their ability to perform daily activities. Dr. Vera Novak, associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and her colleagues followed a group of 65 older people. About half had type 2 diabetes, and half did not. After two years, the diabetic patients had lower scores on cognitive tests compared to when they began, while people without diabetes showed little change on the tests. MORE: The Strange Way a Diabetes Drug May Help Skin Scars What drove the decline, says Novak, were changes in the brains of the diabetic patients. Diabetes can cause blood vessels to be less responsive to the ebb and flow of demand in different parts of the brain. Normally, flexible vessels will swell slightly to increase blood flow and oxygen to areas that are more intensely active, such as regions involved in memory or higher reasoning during intellectual tasks. But unchecked blood sugar can make these vessels less malleable and therefore less responsive. “When doing any task, from cognition to moving your fingers, you need to increase blood flow to that specific area of the brain,” says Novak. “With diabetes, however, that vasodilation ability is reduced, so you have fewer resources to perform any task.” MORE: Statins May Seriously Increase Diabetes Risk In the study, Novak measured the changes in the flexibility of the blood v Continue reading >>

Causes & Natural Treatments For Brain Fog

Causes & Natural Treatments For Brain Fog

If you find yourself constantly feeling fatigued, distracted, moody and just plain “off,” you’re likely dealing with some sort of “brain fog.” Brain fog has become an unwanted side effect of our fast-paced, industrialized lifestyle. Unfortunately today, many of the convenient-but-processed foods and factory-farmed meats we eat and the various ways we spend our time do not support brain health. A high percentage of people suffer from nutrient deficiencies, sugar overload, a lack of sleep and high amounts of stress, all of which deplete energy levels. The brain relies on a steady stream of vitamins and minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, and glucose from complex carbohydrates, in addition to getting enough rest and relaxation. Experiencing brain fog? Download our natural treatment guide here. Luckily, brain fog is considered a reparable condition. Want to regain your sense of clear-headedness, focus and joy? Like nearly all things health-related, it starts with addressing the underlying issues, including your diet, stress levels, sleep and level of physical activity. Symptoms of Brain Fog Suffering from brain fog is basically the opposite of feeling level-headed, calm, optimistic and motivated. Brain fog can easily rob you of inspiration and happiness, while increasing the likelihood for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Researchers from the Departments of Physiology and Medicine at New York Medical College Valhalla describe brain fog symptoms as “an interaction of physiological, cognitive, and perceptual factors.” It’s likely that brain fog is rooted in a lifestyle that promotes inflammation and hormonal imbalances — and is exacerbated by stress. Brain fog symptoms usually include: low energy or fatigue (including chronic fatigue syndrome) i Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

Tweet Because diabetes is such a diverse disease with many complications, it can cause dizziness in many ways by affecting different parts of the body. Dizziness is an episode of unsteadiness and unbalance as a result of something affecting the brain or ears. However, dizziness can also be a symptom of many things other than diabetes. So if you are experiencing recurrent dizzy spells, you should contact your doctor who will be able to diagnose the cause. Causes of dizziness A dizzy spell can be brought on by many things, but in cases of diabetes the most common causes are: Low blood pressure Dizziness can be cause by the heart's inability to pump blood up to the brain sufficiently, especially when suddenly standing up from a sitting or a lying position. As the blood momentarily fails to reach the brain, a spinning sensation, unsteadiness or even fainting can occur. Dehydration High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can cause polyuria, which in turn can lead to dehydration by passing too much fluid out of the body in an attempt to remove excess glucose. With low levels of water in the body, the brain may struggle to function correctly and cause light headedness. Hypoglycemia Having a low amount of sugar in your blood (hypoglycemia) can lead to dizziness by causing the brain cells to malfunction. Certain medications Some medications, including those used to treat people with diabetes, can cause dizzy spells. The instruction leaflet that comes with a medicine will list any possible side effects of the drug. When to see your doctor If you are suffering from bouts of dizziness that are recurrent or persistent you should go and see a doctor. They will likely ask questions to gauge whether there is a pattern to the feelings of dizziness, so keeping a record of dizzy spells pr Continue reading >>

Metformin And A Fuzzy Head?

Metformin And A Fuzzy Head?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am the OH of a recently diagnosed type 2 diabetic. This is all brand new to us as nobody in either family has suffered diabetes before. OH has been prescribed 3 x 500mg of Metformin per day. Is it normal to have what can only be described as a fuzzy head for most of the day, as well as moderate lethargy? I am the OH of a recently diagnosed type 2 diabetic. This is all brand new to us as nobody in either family has suffered diabetes before. OH has been prescribed 3 x 500mg of Metformin per day. Is it normal to have what can only be described as a fuzzy head for most of the day, as well as moderate lethargy? Most have stomach problems but I had problems with my balance , coordination and even speech. You could cerainly say I had a "fuzzy head" Some hink I still have! I have read posts from a few others abou hese pronblems so I would say - not usual- but not unheard of. Is it Metformin SR? If not ask to change . Fewer side effects Hope this helps. Hi, do you mean a fuzzy head as a side effect of the Metformin, because that's not something i've heard of. But it does sound like the sort of feeling from your blood sugars being high generally. Try to get a blood reading when it happens, if you have a meter. I was diagnosed on the 11th April and put on 500mg metformin. 1 + 1. By 13th it was 2 + 1 and by the 16th it was 2 + 2, which is the dose I am currently on, so one more than your OH. I've not had a fuzzy head, BUT I remember having a extremely fuzzy head prior to my diagnosis when my BG must have been around the 15 mark. Sometimes now about 45 mins after I eat I get extremely head-noddingly tired and I certainly can't think staight whilst I'm so tired. Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

I get my first cup of coffee and sit on the sun deck with the birds singing. I feel as if I have not slept a wink, and my head aches. I could go back to bed and sleep all day, but work awaits. It’s a beautiful, sunny day, but my body feels heavy, and stuck to the chair. It hurts to lift my arms. My blood sugar was 381 this morning. Again. I think about having to face the day at the office. Driving down the interstate, the lines are blurry. I know that if the DMV got wind of it, I might not be driving as high as my A1C had been. When I get to the office, I walk in with a dark fog feeling surrounding me, and take some deep breaths at my desk. As I begin to review the end of the month reports, the numbers get fuzzy, and I can’t concentrate on them. My 36 ounce water bottle with only a few sips left beads sweat on the desk, and it’s across the building to get to the bathroom. Sometimes it’s a race to get there in time. My body is taught and swollen, like the Blueberry Girl from Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. My blood sugar is a blue river of sticky blueberry filling as I roll down the hall toward the bathroom. I feel that if I had a needle, I could pop myself. That would surely be a mess. My skin is so dry and flaky that no amount of lotion will hydrate it. No amount of water can quench my thirst, and my mouth feels like the Sahara Desert. With one hand on the water cooler, and the other hand on the bathroom door, I guzzled down what I could until the feeling hit that I wasn’t going to be able to wait any longer. I was out of regular insulin, and I had taken my long acting insulin. I was not so patiently waiting for it to kick in. This morning was not starting out so well. I’d have to tackle the reports in my current brain fog. I did have a doctor’s appoin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Foggy Brain

Diabetes And A Foggy Brain

“Today was embarrassing at work” said my 59 year-old husband Don, after he got home from work. “Why?” I asked. “I just couldn’t think today. No matter what I did, I just couldn’t remember things that I was told to do.” So I learned this week that my husband is having clarity of mind issues, a foggy brain! He now carries a tablet and pen with him. “I’m really afraid to drive” he said. I just don’t remember where I was going or what I was going to pick up for parts for the job and people just stared at me as if something was wrong with me at the store.” Don said. Of course, I’m sure the staring was just him thinking people were staring at him at the store when he stopped for something for work, but he has been forgetting more and more these past few weeks. Coming home from church on Sunday, Don said, “I’m ok to drive, but I’m not seeing the wording clearly on the signs at all.” I’m alarmed that something is going on with him, and isn’t normal. Driving with diabetes issues such as low blood sugar or high blood sugar can be dangerous if the diabetes isn't managed. Do these symptoms come from having type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms that he is experiencing due to having some other complication? How about fibromyalgia? He also has been stumbling over some words or sentences, and at times, I finished his sentence. Is this due to lack of sleep? How can he improve his sleep? Is he getting enough oxygen? Why is he so fatigued? Why does he have joint stiffness and muscle aches? Why the numbness and tingling in the face. Why does he have difficult swallowing when it is meal time? How about fibromyalgia which he has been diagnosed with a few years ago? Maybe? These issues are bringing on anxiety, stress and depression for him too, as he awaits Continue reading >>

Why Is My Brain So Foggy?

Why Is My Brain So Foggy?

Why Is My Brain So Foggy? Do you often feel that you can’t think as clearly or quickly as you’d like? Are you easily distracted? Do you find it difficult to stay focused on a mental task? These are all common experiences and are colloquially referred to as having a foggy head. It’s natural to feel mentally tired if you’ve been working long hours or haven’t had enough sleep, but it’s not normal to feel this way most of the time. Having a foggy head is an extremely common problem and at least half of my patients list it as a problem on their consultation questionnaire when they book an appointment. I don’t think this is a symptom to be taken lightly. The health of your brain is extremely important. Anything that impairs the health and function of your brain can have a negative effect on all aspects of your life. People who suffer with a foggy head are more likely to experience stress and difficulties in their job or studies, and they are more likely to experience mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. They may also be at increased risk of dementia when they are older. You need to know what’s causing your foggy head if you wish to improve it. You may find some of the causes rather surprising. The most common causes of foggy head Bowel toxicity and leaky gut syndrome If you have a toxic bowel, you will inevitably flood your brain with toxins. You may have heard about leaky gut syndrome. It is a condition where the lining of the intestinal tract becomes excessively permeable. This means waste, bacteria, undigested foods, heavy metals, yeast, bacterial toxins and other harmful substances are able to cross through the gut lining and into the bloodstream. These substances are supposed to stay in your gut; they are not supposed to be able to pollute your Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

One danger of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is that you might not know you’re having it. Low glucose levels affect your brain and can leave you unable to recognize a problem or seek a solution. Low blood sugar is not a symptom of diabetes. It’s a side effect of diabetes treatment. It happens when you have too much insulin for the amount of food you have eaten. You can get hypoglycemia (high-po-glye-SEEM-e-uh) if you take insulin or if you take pills that stimulate your body to release insulin from the pancreas. These pills include sulfonylureas, such as chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide (Orinase). Other drugs that raise insulin and can lead to hypoglycemia include the meglitinides, such as repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix). Combination drugs that contain sulfonylureas or meglitinides can also potentially cause lows. You can see a more complete list of drugs that cause hypoglycemia here. If you have too much insulin and don’t eat enough, or you exercise too much, you will likely develop low blood sugar. The symptoms can range from annoying, like excessive sweating, to life-threatening, like passing out while driving or having seizures. Celia Kirkman, RN, CDE, wrote that “Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many functions.” You can’t pay attention to things, you’re less aware of your environment; you have less control of your emotions. This is what makes low blood sugar hard to treat and prevent. Your brain is supposed to pick up warning signs and address problems, but your brain is impaired by low glucose. Symptoms of low Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Brain

Diabetes And Your Brain

By Terri D'Arrigo WebMD Feature Your brain is a finely tuned organ. But it’s sensitive to the amount of sugar, or glucose, it receives as fuel. Whether you have type 1 or type 2, both the high blood glucose of uncontrolled diabetes and the low blood glucose that sometimes comes with diabetes treatment can affect your brain. The Dangers of High Blood Glucose Some of diabetes’ effects on the brain aren’t obvious right away, especially when they are related to high blood sugar. “With diabetes, you have an increased risk of damage to blood vessels over time, including damage to the small blood vessels in the brain. This damage affects the brain’s white matter,” says Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, of the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute. White matter is the part of the brain where nerves talk to one another. When the nerves in the brain are damaged, you can have changes in thinking called vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. Vascular cognitive impairment can happen with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but there are some differences in risk, says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. “The longer you have diabetes [in general], the more of a chance there is of developing dementia, but we see much less of it in people with type 1 whose diabetes is well-controlled,” he says. People with type 2 may face a double-whammy because they tend to have other problems that also can cause blood vessel damage. “These patients tend to be less metabolically fit overall, with low HDL [“good”] cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure, and they are more likely to be obese,” Zonszein says. Diabetes can combine with these other problems to create inflammation that damages bl Continue reading >>

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