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High Blood Sugar Danger Zone

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

Lows & Highs: Blood Sugar Levels

Lows & Highs: Blood Sugar Levels

Keeping blood glucose (sugar) levels in a healthy range can be challenging. Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar is very important for people living with diabetes, as well as their friends and family members. What is low blood glucose (sugar)? When the amount of blood glucose (sugar in your blood) has dropped below your target range (less than four mmol/L), it is called low blood glucose (sugar) or hypoglycemia. What are the signs of a low blood glucose (sugar) level? You may feel: Shaky, light-headed, nauseated Nervous, irritable, anxious Confused, unable to concentrate Hungry Your heart rate is faster Sweaty, headachy Weak, drowsy A numbness or tingling in your tongue or lips Very low blood glucose can make you: Confused and disoriented Lose consciousness Have a seizure Make sure you always wear your MedicAlert® identification, and talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about prevention and emergency treatment for severe low blood glucose (sugar). What causes a low blood glucose (sugar) level (hypoglycemia)? Low blood glucose (sugar) may be caused by: More physical activity than usual Not eating on time Eating less than you should have Taking too much medication The effects of drinking alcohol How do I treat low blood glucose (sugar)? If you are experiencing the signs of a low blood glucose (sugar) level, check your blood glucose (sugar) immediately. If you don’t have your meter with you, treat the symptoms anyway. It is better to be safe. Step one: Low blood glucose (sugar) can happen quickly, so it is important to treat it right away. If your blood glucose (sugar) drops very low, you may need help from another person. Eat or drink a fast-acting carbohydrate (15 grams): 15 grams of glucose in the form of glucose tablets (preferred c Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Is Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

Low blood glucose or hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems associated with insulin treatment, but it can also happen to people with diabetes taking pills. In general, hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Low blood glucose is usually unpleasant, with the most common symptoms including feeling shaky, sweaty and having one's heart pound. The most common reasons for hypoglycemia are too much diabetes medicine, too little food or a delayed meal, or too much or unplanned activity. A less common, but occasional cause for hypoglycemia, is drinking alcoholic beverages. Most hypoglycemia is mild with recognizable symptoms. If quickly and appropriately treated, it is more of an inconvenience than a cause for alarm. However, severe hypoglycemia that causes mental confusion, antagonistic behaviors, unconsciousness, or seizures is a reason for alarm. We define severe hypoglycemia as the point at which you are not able to independently treat yourself. It is dangerous and to be avoided! Not because hypoglycemia, in itself, is fatal. That is very, very rare. What is dangerous is what might happen as a result of the hypoglycemia. The biggest danger is a motor vehicle accident caused, for example, by passing out at the wheel, swerving into on-coming traffic, hitting a tree, or running stop signs. Sometimes people are seriously injured in other types of accidents related to hypoglycemia, such as falling down stairs. It is equally important to avoid unconsciousness and seizures caused by hypoglycemia, not only because of the increased risk for accidents, but because of the potential for brain damage related to repeated severe hypoglycemia. Guidelines for managing hypoglycemia Recognize symptoms (physical, emotional, mental) and that these symptoms are v Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

Are You In The Diabetes Danger Zone? Here Are Some Strategies To Reduce Your Risk

Are You In The Diabetes Danger Zone? Here Are Some Strategies To Reduce Your Risk

Are you in the diabetes danger zone? Here are some strategies to reduce your risk Editor's note: This story was originally published Nov. 1, 2016. We're bringing it back because November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Here are some strategies to reduce your risk for diabetes: Choose whole grains rather than processed breads and cereals. When shopping for bread, remember that "wheat flour" doesn't always mean whole grain. Eat whole fruits and vegetables in their original, unprocessed state, as well as nuts and berries. While many people assume that fruit juices are "healthy," whole fruits are healthier. It's much better to eat an apple than drink a glass of apple juice. Drink water instead of soda. The American Diabetes Association recommends avoiding all sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, fruit punch and fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks and sweet tea. Artificially sweetened soft drinks have also been linked to increased diabetes risk. Try steaming or poaching your foods. One recent study suggests that changing the way you cook might reduce diabetes risk. When foods are fried, grilled or baked, they produce substances called advanced glycation end products, or AGEs, which are linked to insulin resistance. In the study, patients who poached or steamed their foods showed improvements in measures of stress, inflammation and insulin resistance, compared to those who continue to grill, bake or fry foods. But while those results are intriguing, remember that the strongest evidence still points to weight loss as the most effective way of reducing diabetes risk, cautions Lona Sandon, assistant professor in the department of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. "The effects of AGEs are not yet fully understood, but Continue reading >>

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

Without diabetes, your blood sugar should stay within the range of 70 to 120 milligrams per deciliter. But if you are diagnosed with diabetes, a more normal range for you may be between 80 and 180 milligrams per deciliter, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Clearly, anything outside of this range is dangerous for a diabetic, and when it gets to a certain level, you may require immediate medical attention. Video of the Day Anytime blood sugar is more than 240 milligrams per deciliter, it’s a cause for concern among diabetics. It is particularly dangerous if your sugar is this high before a meal, since consuming any food would probably cause it to rise even more. When your blood glucose is above 240 milligrams per deciliter, it means your system isn’t getting the energy it needs from glucose and could start breaking down fats. Your body starts producing ketones, which stem from fat deconstruction, possibly putting you into ketoacidosis that could lead to a diabetic coma. If your blood sugar surges to over 300 milligrams per deciliter, contact your physician immediately, since it could be life-threatening. Continue reading >>

Managing Highs And Lows Of Blood Glucose Levels

Managing Highs And Lows Of Blood Glucose Levels

Disclaimer - This content has been created for information purposes only, please consult your doctor before taking any decision on diabetes management. Although great care has been taken in compiling and checking the information, Johnson and Johnson Ltd., and its associates shall not be responsible, or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in this publication whether arising from negligence or otherwise however, or for any consequence arising there from. Hyperglycemia is blood glucose levels that rise above the Diabetes Safe Zone. The American Diabetes Association defines hyperglycemia as blood glucose levels over 130 mg/dL(7.2 mmol/L). If you are on insulin it is also important to watch out for high blood glucose (also known as hyperglycemia), which increases your risk of complications, such as heart attack. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is often the only sure way to detect hyperglycemia. For most people, keep blood glucose levels- Your own blood glucose targets need to be carefully individualized. Please check with your personal physician on what blood glucose target values are right for you and your condition. Regular monitoring helps you spot patterns to try to avoid high and low blood glucose, reduce complications of diabetes, and help control your diabetes. Let's look at situations that may cause high blood glucose and how planning ahead may help you prevent highs and lows. Plan ahead and be prepared for high fasting results If you have high fasting results, you may have: Missed your evening dose of insulin Plan: Keep your insulin kit by your bedside and post reminder notes Used a new insulin or new dosage or your insulin needs to be adjusted Plan: Self-monitor before injecting. Follow up the next morning with a fasting blood glucos Continue reading >>

25 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is In The Danger Zone

25 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar Is In The Danger Zone

Ready for a scary stat about blood sugar? There are more than 29 million Americans who have diabetes. In fact, over the past 50 years, sugar consumption in the US has tripled. High blood sugar happens when the level of sugar (also known as glucose) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from the foods we eat and those foods impact our blood sugar in one way or another. Diabetes is a condition that occurs when your blood sugar levels are high and when not treated, diabetes can lead to serious complications like heart disease, kidney damage, vision loss and nerve damage. More than 8 million people across America don’t even know they have it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One of the main reasons so many people are left untreated is because the warning signs that your blood sugar levels are too high can be very sneaky. Be prepared by understanding which subtle signals your body is giving you that something may be wrong with your blood sugar. Here’s what to look for. 25 Sneaky Signs Your Blood Sugar is Too High Inflamed or Infected Gums Blurred vision Headache Fatigue or drowsiness Frequent urination Urination during the night Increased thirst Increased appetite Recurring infections Impotence Slow healing of cuts and wounds Weight loss Dry, itchy skin Shortness of breath Nausea A strong breath odor that smells fruity Stomach problems Difficulty concentrating Excess abdominal fat/weight gain Nerve problems Rapid, deep breathing Fast heart rate and a weak pulse Skin discoloration Strange sensations in your feet Chronic constipation or chronic diarrhea If you’re feeling really thirsty or tired for a few days, it probably isn’t a big deal. But if these symptoms stick around for more than a day or two, get to your doctor right aw Continue reading >>

Unsafe Blood Sugar Levels

Unsafe Blood Sugar Levels

Blood sugar refers to the amount of sugar--or glucose--in your blood. The hormone insulin helps the body process and use glucose. Normally, blood sugar increases after eating, and the pancreas releases insulin to regulate glucose levels. In people with diabetes (high blood sugar) or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the body is not able to regulate blood sugar on its own, resulting in sometimes very dangerous reactions. High Blood Sugar High blood sugar occurs when there is not enough insulin produced, or when the body cannot properly process insulin. Blood sugar that remains high for a long time can cause serious damage to the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Some signs of high blood sugar include high blood glucose levels in a blood or urine test, frequent urination and an increase in thirst. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar can be caused by stress, hunger and insulin reactions. If you have been diagnosed with hypoglycemia or with diabetes, it is important to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia and to know how to treat this condition. Symptoms include shakiness and dizziness, sweating, severe feelings of hunger, sudden moodiness, lack of concentration and clumsiness. Normal Levels of Blood Sugar There are several types of blood glucose tests, which include fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar and random blood sugar testing. Fasting blood sugar tests measure glucose levels after 8 hours without food or drink and should result in a normal range of 70 to 99 milligrams glucose per deciliter of blood; postprandial blood sugar tests measure glucose levels within two hours after eating and should result in a range of 70 to 145 mg/dL; random blood sugar tests are taken at intervals throughout the day and should result in glucose levels of 70 to125 mg/dL. Blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

12 Types Of High Blood Sugars

12 Types Of High Blood Sugars

The following is an excerpt from Laura Kronen’s book on living with diabetes: “Too Sweet: The Not-So-Serious Side to Diabetes.” What goes up, must come down. The only thing I hope for when my blood sugar is high is for it to decline, pronto! Our pancreases are broken. Because of this, we have blood sugars that are less than perfect. Many times our readings are much too high. The technical name for this is hyperglycemia. Sometimes the amount of glucose in your blood can even skyrocket to dangerous levels. The sad fact is that every person with diabetes has experienced highs more times than he or she would probably care to admit. Highs are frustrating and time consuming—they slow you down, depress you, and can make you feel defeated. Plus they are dangerous and can do all sorts of torturous things to your body. When you first realize you have high blood sugar, you know that it’s not going to be an easy fix. Highs can take hours to come down. If you eat or drink anything it will just drag out the process longer. This is one of the most frustrating things about being a diabetic. I like an instant solution, and that’s why lows are so much more appealing to me. I’ll take a 58 over a 258 any day of the week. Highs result in psychotic repeated glucose testing to see if the numbers are starting a downward trend. It is impossible to put your high sugar level out of your mind; it’s a recurring thought that will not take a back seat to any other thought in your head. Everything slows down when you get a high. Reflexes are sluggish, your mind is drowsy, and you feel that overall you are in a sugar-induced fog. Many times all you want to do is nap, but you can’t. Unfortunately, life does not come to a halt just because your blood sugar is high. I have a love/hate re Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Readings

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Readings

Testing your blood sugar at home—also called self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG)—is the single best tool you have to manage your type 1 or type 2 diabetes on a daily basis. Why? Testing helps you: 1. Catch and treat any dangerous blood sugar highs or lows. 2. Understand how your blood sugar rises in reaction to certain foods. 3. Recognize how exercise changes your blood sugar levels. 4. Determine if your diabetes medications are working. 5. Calculate your insulin dose for meals (if you have been prescribed a rapid-acting insulin). By using the information from regular blood sugar testing, you can make sure your efforts to eat right, exercise, and take your medications are paying off. And studies show that keeping your blood sugar under control is the best way to reduce your risk of long-term diabetes complications like kidney damage and heart and eye disease. What is a healthy blood sugar level? Everyone has unique blood sugar targets based on their individual medical history, age, and lifestyle needs. However, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the following general goals for non-pregnant adults: Fasting (before meals; upon waking): 70–130 mg/dL (3.9–7.2 mmol/L) Postprandial (one to two hours after the start of a meal): no greater than 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) Remember, these are only guidelines. Talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about the blood sugar targets that are right for you. They can also advise you on how often you should be testing. What is a blood sugar emergency? Extremely high or low blood sugars can be dangerous to people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin treatments and certain oral diabetes medications can trigger blood sugar lows, or hypoglycemia. Everyone has a different lower threshold for feeling the effects of Continue reading >>

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