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High Blood Pressure And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Print Overview Low blood pressure might seem desirable, and for some people, it causes no problems. However, for many people, abnormally low blood pressure (hypotension) can cause dizziness and fainting. In severe cases, low blood pressure can be life-threatening. A blood pressure reading lower than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for the top number (systolic) or 60 mm Hg for the bottom number (diastolic) is generally considered low blood pressure. The causes of low blood pressure can range from dehydration to serious medical or surgical disorders. It's important to find out what's causing your low blood pressure so that it can be treated. Symptoms For some people, low blood pressure signals an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as: Dizziness or lightheadedness Fainting (syncope) Blurred vision Nausea Fatigue Lack of concentration Shock Extreme hypotension can result in this life-threatening condition. Signs and symptoms include: Confusion, especially in older people Cold, clammy, pale skin Rapid, shallow breathing Weak and rapid pulse When to see a doctor If you have indications of shock, seek emergency medical help. If you have consistently low blood pressure readings but feel fine, your doctor is likely just to monitor you during routine exams. Even occasional dizziness or lightheadedness may be a relatively minor problem — the result of mild dehydration from too much time in the sun or a hot tub, for example. Still, it's important to see your doctor if you have signs or symptoms of hypotension because they can point to more-serious problems. It can be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms, when they occur and what you're doing at the time. Causes Blood pressure is a measurement of the pressure i Continue reading >>

Does Hypoglycemia Cause High Blood Pressure?

Does Hypoglycemia Cause High Blood Pressure?

Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too low. Normally, your body keeps your blood glucose within a concentration range of 4.0 mmol/L to 8.0 mmol/L (about 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL). In order to do this, the body has mechanisms that involve the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas, as well as several other hormones. When blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin to encourage the movement of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. Insulin lowers the amount of glucose in your blood by signalling the cells in the body to use the glucose as fuel. Your body uses glucose as its main fuel. The brain requires a constant supply of blood glucose and will signal the adrenal glands to release two hormones called adrenaline and cortisol whenever blood glucose levels are low. The adrenaline and cortisol then signal the liver to convert the carbohydrates it stores (from the foods we eat) into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The pancreas is also involved in raising blood glucose levels if they fall too low. When blood sugar is low, the pancreas releases the hormone glucagon, which increases blood sugar by signalling the liver to convert stored carbohydrates into glucose and to create new glucose molecules from other substances (such as amino acids) in the liver. If these mechanisms don’t work properly, the blood glucose remains too low and the brain won’t be able to function normally. Hypoglycemia can also be caused by a problem with the pituitary or adrenal glands, the pancreas, the kidneys, or the liver. The pituitary gland controls the body’s production of some of the hormones needed to raise the body’s blood sugar levels if they fall too low. These hormones include cortisol, which is released f Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension) Symptoms And Treatments

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension) Symptoms And Treatments

Low blood pressure (hypotension) definition and facts Low blood pressure, also called hypotension, is blood pressure low enough that the flow of blood to the organs of the body is inadequate and symptoms and/or signs of low blood flow develop shock. Low pressure alone, without symptoms or signs, usually is not unhealthy. The symptoms of low blood pressure include lightheadedness, dizziness, and fainting. These symptoms are most prominent when individuals go from the lying or sitting position to the standing position (orthostatic hypotension). Low blood pressure that causes an inadequate flow of blood to the body's organs can cause strokes, heart attacks, and kidney failure. It's most severe form is shock. Common causes of low blood pressure include a reduced volume of blood, heart disease, and medications. The cause of low blood pressure can be determined with blood tests, radiologic studies, and cardiac testing to look for heart failure and arrhythmias. Treatment of low blood pressure is determined by the cause of the low pressure. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension): Symptoms, Signs, Causes Symptoms of low blood pressure or hypotension may include: Fainting (syncope) Dizziness A feeling of lightheadedness Chest pain Blurred vision Increased thirst Nausea What is low blood pressure? What do the numbers mean (chart with ranges)? Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of blood vessels. It constitutes one of the critically important signs of life or vital signs which include heart rate, breathing, and temperature. Blood pressure is generated by the heart pumping blood into the arteries modified by the response of the arteries to the flow of blood. An individual's blood pressure is expressed as systolic/diastolic blood pressure, for example, 120 Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Pressure Symptoms

High And Low Blood Pressure Symptoms

Tweet Blood pressure control is important whether you have diabetes or not. However, having high blood pressure is a key risk factor in developing heart disease, stroke and other complications of diabetes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are often associated, and many people with diabetes take medication to lower their blood pressure. What is blood pressure? Blood pressure means the pressure of blood in your arteries as it is being pumped by the heart. Targets for people with type 1 diabetes The targets for people with type 1 diabetes is to have a resting blood pressure level below 135/85 mmHg. If you have signs of kidney disease or metabolic syndrome your blood pressure level should be below 130/80 mmHg. Targets for people with type 2 diabetes The target blood pressure targets for type 2 diabetes: Below 140/80 mmHg Or below 130/80 mmHg if you have kidney disease, retinopathy or have cerebrovascular disease (including stroke) What are the symptoms of high blood pressure? Most diabetics with high blood pressure have no symptoms. However, very high blood pressure or rapidly rising blood pressure can cause: Headaches Vision problems Nose bleeds Trouble breathing Fits Black-outs What are the symptoms of low blood pressure? Similar to high blood pressure, the symptoms of low pressure may not always be apparent. If you do get symptoms, they may be identified as any of the following: Feeling dizzy, light headed or fainting Blurred vision A rapid or irregular heartbeat Feeling nauseous Confusion What do blood pressure numbers mean? Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury, as two figures, for example 124/80 mmHg. The first number (124 in this case) is known as systolic pressure - pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. The second number (80 here) is dias Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure (hypertension) can lead to many complications of diabetes, including diabetic eye disease and kidney disease, or make them worse. Most people with diabetes will eventually have high blood pressure, along with other heart and circulation problems. Diabetes damages arteries and makes them targets for hardening, called atherosclerosis. That can cause high blood pressure, which if not treated, can lead to trouble including blood vessel damage, heart attack, and kidney failure. Compared to those with normal blood pressure readings, people with hypertension more often have: Peripheral vascular disease, hardening of the arteries in the legs and feet Even blood pressure that's at the higher end of normal (120/80 to 129/80), called elevated, impacts your health. Studies show that you have a two to three times greater chance of getting heart disease over 10 years. Readings vary, but most people with diabetes should have a blood pressure of no more than 130/80. The first, or top, number is the "systolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart squeezes and fills the vessels with blood. The second, or bottom, number is the "diastolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart rests between beats, filling itself with blood for the next contraction. When it comes to preventing diabetes complications, normal blood pressure is as important as good control of your blood sugar levels. Usually, high blood pressure has no symptoms. That's why you need to check your blood pressure regularly. Your doctor will probably measure it at every visit, and you may need to check it at home, too. Many of the things you do for your diabetes will also help with high blood pressure: Control your blood sugar. Don't drink a lot of alcohol. Limit how m Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, can be a dangerous condition. Low blood sugar can happen in people with diabetes who take medicines that increase insulin levels in the body. Taking too much medication, skipping meals, eating less than normal, or exercising more than usual can lead to low blood sugar for these individuals. Blood sugar is also known as glucose. Glucose comes from food and serves as an important energy source for the body. Carbohydrates — foods such as rice, potatoes, bread, tortillas, cereal, fruit, vegetables, and milk — are the body’s main source of glucose. After you eat, glucose is absorbed into your bloodstream, where it travels to your body’s cells. A hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas, helps your cells use glucose for energy. If you eat more glucose than you need, your body will store it in your liver and muscles or change it into fat so it can be used for energy when it’s needed later. Without enough glucose, your body cannot perform its normal functions. In the short term, people who aren’t on medications that increase insulin have enough glucose to maintain blood sugar levels, and the liver can make glucose if needed. However, for those on these specific medications, a short-term reduction in blood sugar can cause a lot of problems. Your blood sugar is considered low when it drops below 70 mg/dL. Immediate treatment for low blood sugar levels is important to prevent more serious symptoms from developing. Explaining low blood sugar in layman's terms » Symptoms of low blood sugar can occur suddenly. They include: rapid heartbeat sudden nervousness headache hunger shaking sweating People with hypoglycemic unawareness do not know their blood sugar is dropping. If you have this condition, your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure - When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Low Blood Pressure - When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Within certain limits, the lower your blood pressure reading is, the better. There is also no specific number at which day-to-day blood pressure is considered too low, as long as none of the symptoms of trouble are present. Symptoms of low blood pressure Most doctors will only consider chronically low blood pressure as dangerous if it causes noticeable signs and symptoms, such as: Dizziness or lightheadedness Nausea Dehydration and unusual thirst Dehydration can sometimes cause blood pressure to drop. However, dehydration does not always cause low blood pressure. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics and strenuous exercise can all lead to dehydration, a potentially serious condition in which your body loses more water than you take in. Even mild dehydration (a loss of as little as 1 percent to 2 percent of body weight) can cause weakness, dizziness and fatigue. Lack of concentration Blurred vision Cold, clammy, pale skin Rapid, shallow breathing Fatigue Depression Underlying causes of low blood pressure Low blood pressure can occur with: Prolonged bed rest Pregnancy During the first 24 weeks of pregnancy, it’s common for blood pressure to drop. Decreases in blood volume A decrease in blood volume can also cause blood pressure to drop. A significant loss of blood from major trauma, dehydration or severe internal bleeding reduces blood volume, leading to a severe drop in blood pressure. Certain medications A number of drugs can cause low blood pressure, including diuretics and other drugs that treat hypertension; heart medications such as beta blockers; drugs for Parkinson’s disease; tricyclic antidepressants; erectile dysfunction drugs, particularly in combination with nitroglycerine; narcotics and alcohol. Other prescription and over-the-counter dru Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Talk around blood pressure typically centers on what to do if blood pressure is too high. We know that high blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes than people without diabetes. We also know that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and kidney disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood pressure goal of less than 140/80 for most people with diabetes. But what if your blood pressure is too low? Is it cause for concern? And what do you do about it? Low blood pressure defined Low blood pressure is also known as “hypotension.” You might be thinking that low blood pressure is a good thing, especially if yours tends to run on the high side. But the reality is that low blood pressure can be a serious condition for some people. For people without diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure of less than 120 over 80 (written as 120/80). Low blood pressure is generally defined as a blood pressure of less than 90/60. If your blood pressure tends to hover in that area without any symptoms, then there’s likely no cause for concern. But if symptoms occur, that’s a signal that something is amiss. Symptoms of low blood pressure Low blood pressure may be a sign that there’s an underlying medical condition, especially if your blood pressure drops suddenly or if you have the following symptoms: • Dizziness or lightheadedness • Fainting • Fast or irregular heartbeat • Feeling weak • Feeling confused • Lack of concentration • Blurred vision • Cold, clammy skin • Nausea • Rapid, shallow breathing • Depression • Dehydration That’s quite a list. Some of the above symptoms can occur if you have, say, the flu, a stomach bug, or have been outside for a long time in h Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Blood Pressure Relationship

Blood Sugar And Blood Pressure Relationship

I was hypertensive quite for some time but I have always been on medication under supervision of medical doctor. About six month ago, new symptom of weekness came which was diagnosed as diabetic. Before detection of the BP problem, I have to critically rethink and compare my recent feeling in the chest region. Whenever I wake up to urinate in the night, I always observed palpitation in the chest which sometimes may or may not disbub my sleep again. After detection of diabetic,among the findings by a cardiologist, my doctor was that, my BMI rose to 27.5, I was then placed on some drug and strickly adviced to control my weight by limiting myself to some foods which are: whole beans, whole wheat products, complex cabohyrdates, a lot vegetable and high fiber vegetatble and limited amount of fatty foods which I did. Within the six months I lost about 8.5kg.During the treatment I was responding very well, the BP came down. But now the the sugar has reduced in the blood. My real problem is that it appears that whenever the blood sugar is below 6.4mmole, the blood pressure begings to rise accompanied with increase pulse rate followed by palpitation of the heart. At sugar below 5.8, I feel very week almost dizzy. If I take glucose to quickly safe situations, and it went up to 9.5mmol, the BP becomes unctrollable satisfatcorilly by my drugs. It appears that my best sugar range is within a very narrow range possibly between 6.2-7.0 mmol. (i) Does it mean that, my own sugar range is not within 4.1-6.1 mmol. (ii) could it have responsible for my risen blood pressure all the while. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia-induced Blood Pressure Elevation In Patients With Diabetes

Hypoglycemia-induced Blood Pressure Elevation In Patients With Diabetes

Blood pressure elevation secondary to hypoglycemia has been demonstrated in human experimentation through the activation of the sympathoadrenal system.1 Though hypoglycemia is a fact of life for patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus,2 blood pressure (BP) variations after hypoglycemic events has not been clarified. Our aim was to determine the relationship between glucose level and BP swings in patients with diabetes under everyday conditions. We performed 24-hour home monitoring of subcutaneous glucose level using a continuous glucose monitoring system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) and simultaneous ambulatory BP measurement (Diasys Integra II; NOVACOR, Rueil-Malmaison, France) in 22 patients with type 1 (n = 4) or type 2 (n = 18) diabetes (mean duration, 18 years). Of the 22 patients, 14 (64%; 10 with type 2 diabetes) were receiving long-term insulin therapy and 18 (82%) were taking hypotensive drugs. The Medtronic MiniMed continuous glucose monitoring system has been shown to be clinically accurate for the recording of hypoglycemic episodes in daily life conditions.3,4 Subcutaneous interstitial glucose values were recorded every 5 minutes, providing approximately 288 readings per day. Hypoglycemia was defined by a blood glucose value lower than 60 mg/dL (to convert to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0555). Blood pressure was measured every 15 minutes during daytime (7 AM–11 PM) and 30 minutes during nighttime (11 PM–7 AM). The last BP and heart rate measurements before blood glucose level fell under 60 mg/dL were taken as reference values to assess the variability of cardiovascular parameters after the hypoglycemic episode and during the 1-hour period before, which was taken as the control period. Statistical analyses were performed using Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

A A A Low blood pressure is a difficult clinical finding for a healthcare professional to address. While high blood pressure is known as the "silent killer," because it is associated with few acute symptoms, hypotension (hypo=low + tension=pressure) may be normal for a patient if it is without symptoms, but can be of great importance if it is associated with abnormal body function. Sometimes low is good, a goal to be achieved in keeping blood pressure under control. Sometimes low is bad because there is not enough pressure to provide blood flow to the organs of the body. Blood pressure readings have two parts and are expressed as a ratio: "Normal" blood pressure, for example is 120/80 (120 over 80) and measures the pressure within the arteries of the body. Systolic pressure, the upper number, measures the pressure within the arteries when the heart is contracting (systole) to pump blood to the body. Diastole pressure, the lower number, measures resting pressures within the arteries, when the heart is at rest. You can think of the heart and the blood vessels (arteries and veins) as a system to pump blood, just like the oil pump in your car. Oil is pumped through rigid tubes. Pressure remains relatively constant throughout the pumping cycle unless the pump fails or there is an oil leak. Then oil pressure will fall. The body is similar, except that the tubes have pliable walls, meaning that the space within the arteries can get bigger or smaller. If the space gets bigger, there is effectively less fluid, and pressure falls. If the space gets smaller, pressure goes up. Arteries have layers of muscles within their walls that can contract and narrow the artery, making less space inside the vessels. Alternatively, the muscles can relax and dilate the artery, making more room. Continue reading >>

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