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Hba1c To Mg/dl

A1c Chart & Calculator Adag

A1c Chart & Calculator Adag

Ads by Google HbA1C Chart is a comfortable way to understand HbA1C % result and help relate it to your BS meter reading. HbA1C chart or table provides conversion between hba1c in % to eAG in mg/dl or mmol/l using the ADAG formula. To use this calculator, you need to enter hba1c to calculate eAG (estimated BS). HbA1C Chart ADAG - HbA1C to blood sugar converter There are many studies and formulas to convert hba1c to blood sugar level. Every individual is different. Thus we provide two hba1c chart one based on ADAG hba1c chart and another based on DCCT A1C chart. We request you to put your mind and find, which chart best suits you. Single 7-point profile without overnight measurements during 3 months in the DCCT. Many CGM and 7-point profile that captured a median of 52 days in ADAG. ADAG provide a complete measure of average glucose. A1C-Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) Study to define the mathematical relationship between HbA1c and eAG. This study included 507 subjects of 268 T1D, 159 T2D and 80 non-diabetics from 10 international centers. Patients were between 18-70 years, and diabetic subjects had stable control. eAG calculation based on the results from at least 2 days of continuous glucose monitoring performed four times, with 7-point daily self-monitoring of capillary glucose carried out at least 3 days per week. The relationship between eAG and hba1c is eAG in mg/dl = (28.7* hba1c)-46.7 or eAG in mmol/l = (1.59 x HbA1c)-2.59 Reference: "Translating the A1C Assay Into Estimated Average Glucose Values," Diabetes Care 31:1473-1478, 2008. Many people have a question, what does it mean if I have a high hba1c and normal blood sugars? Many others have a question, what does it mean if I had good hba1c and high fasting glucose? If you are one among them, visit A1C glucose lev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis

Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) published new Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes in 2011 (Diabetes Care 2011;34: Supplement 1, S11). Historically, the diagnosis of diabetes was based on fasting plasma glucose and 2 hour plasma glucose level after a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Despite being the gold standard, measurement of blood glucose is less accurate and precise than most physicians realize. Blood glucose measurements are also subject to several limitations including: 8-12 hour fasting specimen requirement Diurnal variation requiring morning collection to capture peak levels Large biological variation of 5-8% Nonstandardized instrument methods with >12% bias Glycolysis after collection, even in sodium fluoride tubes In 2009, an International Expert Committee recommended the use of the HbA1c test to diagnose diabetes, with a threshold of 6.5% or greater (Diabetes Care 2009, 32 (7):1327-1334). The American Diabetes Association adopted this criterion in 2010. The diagnostic cutpoint of 6.5% was recommended based on the risk for developing microvascular complications such as retinopathy. This HbA1c criterion identifies one third fewer cases of undiagnosed diabetes than a fasting glucose cut point of 126 mg/dL or greater. However, the advantages of using HbA1c outweigh this limitation. Better index of overall glycemic exposure & risk of complications Low intraindividual variability (<2%) No requirement for fasting or timed specimen Standardized methods with precision <2% Less affected by acute illness or stress Good stability after blood collection Single test can be used for both diagnosis and monitoring Today, the diagnostic criteria for diabetes include one of the following: HbA1c of 6.5% or greater Fasting plasma glucose of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mm Continue reading >>

What Is A1c?

What Is A1c?

A1c stands for glycated hemoglobin, a molecule that forms when the oxygen transporting-protein hemoglobin naturally bonds with glucose in the blood. This ‘glycated’ molecule is also commonly expressed as hemoglobin A1c, and measuring it gives clinicians a marker of your average blood sugar over the preceding 8 to 12 weeks. How is A1c measured? An A1c test is a clinical test that involves taking a sample of blood, often from the arm but sometimes from the finger, and using a specialist machine to measure the level of glycated hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a protein found within your red blood cells that helps to carry oxygen around the body. In the presence of glucose, hemoglobin bonds to glucose so people with higher levels of glucose in the blood for extended periods of time will have higher levels of glycated hemoglobin until those red blood cells reach the end of their life, which typically takes 90 days. The A1c test therefore gives a good indication of how high your blood glucose levels have been over the past 3 months. When are A1c tests run? A1c tests are run so you and your health team can monitor how well your diabetes is being controlled. Your doctor may give you your results as an A1c percentage or may give your results as estimated average glucose (eAG) which is given in mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). A1c tests may also be used in assessing risk of type 2 diabetes for people not diagnosed with diabetes. Target A1c levels Targets for A1c are as follows: For people without diabetes, the range is 4 to 5.9% (eAG 68 to 123 mg/dL) For non-pregnant adults with diabetes, an A1c level of 7% (eAG 154 mg/dL) is considered good control, although some people that are not at risk of hypoglycemia may prefer their numbers to be closer to that of non-diabetics For childre Continue reading >>

Why The A1c Test Is Important

Why The A1c Test Is Important

The A1c is a blood test, done in a lab, that shows what your average blood sugar has been for the past 3 months. Other names for this test are glycosylated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c. How the A1c Test Works The glucose that the body doesn't store or use for energy stays in the blood and attaches to red blood cells, which live in the bloodstream for about 4 months. The lab test measures the amount of glucose attached to the red blood cells. The amount is the A1c and is shown as a percentage. Your A1c number can give you and your health care team a good idea of how well you've controlled your blood sugar over the previous 2 to 3 months. When you get your A1c result from a Kaiser Permanente lab, you'll also see another number called the estimated Average Glucose, or eAG. Understanding the eAG Your estimated Average Glucose (eAG) number is calculated from the result of your A1c test. Like the A1c, the eAG shows what your average blood sugars have been over the previous 2 to 3 months. Instead of a percentage, the eAG is in the same units (mg/dl) as your blood glucose meter. The chart shows the relationship between the A1c percentage and the eAG. If A1c % is: Your eAG is: 6 126 6.5 140 7 154 7.5 169 8 183 8.5 197 9 212 9.5 226 10 240 10.5 255 11 269 11.5 283 12 298 What the Numbers Mean The A1c and eAG reflect your average blood sugar over a period of time. These numbers help you and your doctor see how well your treatment plan is working. The higher your A1c and eAG numbers are, the higher your chances for having long-term health problems caused by consistently high blood sugar levels. These problems include heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, vision problems, and numbness in your legs or feet. The lower your A1c and eAG numbers, the lower you Continue reading >>

Conversion Of Fructosamine To Approximate Hba1c Level

Conversion Of Fructosamine To Approximate Hba1c Level

The fructosamine assay is a measure of glycaemic control over a period of 2 to 3 weeks in diabetic patients. It is cheap and rapid. It measures the levels of glycosylated - with fructose groups - serum proteins. Interpretation of serum fructosamine level as with many lab values, the reference range is different from laboratory to laboratory, so all results must be interpreted within the context of the institution you are practicing in. As a guideline, each 75 umol change equals a change of approximately 60 mg/dl blood sugar or 2% HbA1c. Here is a rough conversion chart: Fructosamine HbA1C (%) HbA1C (mmol/mol) 212.5 5.0 31 250 6.0 42 287.5 7.0 53 325 8.0 64 362.5 9.0 75 400 10.0 86 437.5 11.0 97 475 12.0 108 Reference: Guillausseau P-J, Charles M-A, Godard V, Timsit J, Chanson P, Paolaggi F et al. Comparison of fructosamine with glycated hemoglobin as an index of glycemic control in diabetic patients. Diabetes Research, 1990. 13:127-131. Continue reading >>

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

What is considered a ‘normal reading’ for the HbA1c calculator? Recommended HbA1c readings fall within the reference range of 6.5 to 7%. This implies that for every 100 red blood cells, 6-7 cells have glucose attached to them. Mean blood sugar levels can be better understood from the following table. HbA1c-Average Blood Glucose Reading % mmol/L mg/dL Inference 3-4 2-4 36-72 Extremely low to low blood sugar 4.5 5.5 99-100 Perfect! 4.5-5 5-6 90-108 Normal range for non-diabetics (pre-prandial) 5.5 - 6 7 – 8 126 - 144 Normal post-prandial in non-diabetics 6.5 – 7 9 - 10 162 - 180 Maximum post-prandial in non-diabetics 6.5 – 7.5 9 – 11 162 - 198 High, even for diabetics 7.5 – 9.5 11 – 15 198 - 270 Indicates to poorly controlled bG 12.5 - 25 20 - 25 360 - 450 Extremely high > 19 33 or > 33 > 594 High possibility of serious electrolyte imbalance!! Key: Blood Glucose, post-prandial, After meal, Pre-prandial, Before meal Micromat™, Diastat™, VARIANT™, Immunoturbidimetric, hemoglobin testing system, diabetes monitoring, beta-thalassemia, hemoglobinopathy, sickle cell disease Rough Glucose Conversions: mmol/L → mg/dL : Multiply by 18 mg/dL → mmol/L: Divide by 18 (or multiply by 0.055) Or, you could simply use Medindia’s Blood Sugar Converter available at or our HbA1c1c1c(A1c) Calculator for Blood Glucose. Since glucose binds slowly to Hemoglobin A (and decomposes at about the same rate), the HbA1c count is a good indicator of average blood glucose over a period of time. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1c of 7% (implying 7 cells out of every 100 have an appendage of blood glucose) or lower. But deciding upon a generalized “perfect blood sugar” value is impossible as this varies from person to person. Instruments to Measure HbA1c1c T Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

Hba1c Testing

Hba1c Testing

The HbA1c test measures your average blood glucose over the previous 8 to 12 weeks and gives an indication of your longer-term blood glucose control. It is used as a screening test to identify diabetes and regular monitoring tool if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. How useful is the test? HbA1c reflects the average plasma glucose (sugar in your bloodstream) over the previous 8 to 12 weeks and measures how much glucose has become stuck onto your red blood cells.(1) It can be performed at any time of the day and does not require any special preparation such as fasting. In recent years, the HbA1c test has become the preferred test for screening and diagnosis of diabetes. In 2011, the HbA1c test in New Zealand was updated to measure in millimoles per mole (mmol/mol) to align with a shift internationally (2). Prior to this, it used to be measured as a percentage (%) and you may still hear people refer to these units at times. The images below show the new and old units. Learning what your target range for HbA1c is very important. Having regular HbA1c tests helps both you and your healthcare team monitor how well your diabetes is controlled and whether any changes in lifestyle or medication are needed. Diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes As a general guide, HbA1c levels of: Less than or equal to 40 mmol/mol is normal. 41 to 49 mmol/mol is prediabetes or 'impaired fasting glucose'. 50 mmol/mol and above suggests diabetes (if symptomatic. If no symptoms of diabetes, two tests on separate occasions are needed). (3) Read more about prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. What are healthy HbA1c levels for people with diabetes? An ideal range or target HbA1c level will vary from person to person and depends on age, type of diabetes and other health conditions or sta Continue reading >>

Hba1c

Hba1c

HbA1c Calculator With this tool you can easily convert HbA1c values from % (NGSP) to mmol/mol (IFCC) and vice versa. In addition, average blood glucose levels can be determined in mg/dL and mmol/L. By insertion of any value all other fields will update automatically. Background The International Consensus Statement of US and European Diabetes Associations recommend consistent standardization of the HbA1c determination to the IFCC1 reference measurement procedure, using the new unit mmol/mol. Since these new values in mmol/mol differ from values determined by the standardization according to NGSP2, it is recommended that HbA1c results should be reported in both units, mmol/mol (SI unit) and derived NGSP units (in %). By means of the calculator above, IFCC values in mmol/mol can be converted into NGSP values in % and vice versa. 1International Federation of Clinical Chemistry 2National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Programme Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

A1c Is Changing To Average Mean Blood Glucose

A1c Is Changing To Average Mean Blood Glucose

A1C Translation to Estimated Average Glucose (eAG) Units Will Yield Easier Patient Education. New more accurate formula used to convert A1c to average blood glucose. A mathematical relationship between the average glucose level over the preceding three months and levels of the A1C test, thus yielding translation of the A1C for reporting as estimated average glucose (eAG), was proven in an international study published online in the August issue of Diabetes Care. A1C has been used for more than 25 years as the major measure of glucose control and to establish targets for diabetes therapy. “The findings of this large study have confirmed what smaller studies have shown and will give us confidence that A1C really does represent an average glucose because we now have a reliable formula to convert A1C into average glucose,” said David M. Nathan, MD, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and cochair of the International A1C-Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) Study, in a recent interview. “While eAG will not replace A1C, physicians will be able to obtain reports both in A1C units of glycated hemoglobin and eAG units of milligrams per deciliter or millimols per liter, depending on the country, and choose which to use in clinical situations.” The implications of using eAG in mg/dl or mmol/L – the same units that patients use for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) at home – were discussed recently by his co-chair, Robert J. Heine, MD, PhD, Professor of Diabetology in the Department of Endocrinology at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, and Executive Medical Director of the Diabetes and Endocrine Division of Eli Lilly and Company. “It is extremely helpful for health care professionals and patients to be using the same language to discuss glucose Continue reading >>

My Patient Has Diabetes! Now What Do I Do?

My Patient Has Diabetes! Now What Do I Do?

You will have patients come to your dental practice with diabetes. Some won’t know they are diabetic. Persons with diabetes may experience the following during or after dental treatment; hypoglycemia, coma, infection or delayed healing. I. Dental management of patients with diabetes II. Complications associated with treating patients with diabetes. Prevention and management of their complications III. What is diabetes and how many people have it? I. Dental management of patients with diabetes 1. Know if your patients have diabetes. Have you asked or looked at their medical history? 2. Know the status of your patient’s diabetes before doing extensive oral surgeries (e.g., multiple extractions, periodontal surgery). Do you know their fasting blood glucose (FBS) or 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level (PP; blood glucose level 2 hr after meal), and hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) levels? Well-controlled diabetes; FBS less than 125 mg/dL, PP less than 140 mg/dL, and HBA1c of less than 7% Moderately controlled diabetes; FBS 125-140 mg/dL, PP 140-200 mg/dL, and HBA1c of between 7 and 8% Uncontrolled diabetes; FBS greater than 140 mg/dL, PP greater than 200 mg/dL, and HBA1c of greater than 8% 3. In patients with well-controlled diabetes; no special treatment for routine prophylaxis and dental restorative care. Tell patients to eat normally and to follow their usual medical regimen (e.g., take medications, inject insulin). Morning appointments are the best for the patient since their cortisol levels are highest in the morning. Do not allow them to skip the morning meal before their appointment. Type 1 patients should NOT schedule their appointment right after an insulin injection in that it may result in hypoglycemia. If anesthesia is needed no more than 2 carpules of lidocaine (1 Continue reading >>

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

We love answering reader questions so if you ever have one yourself, please send it in Todays question: I was wondering if a 120 blood sugar level is too high? For those measuring blood sugar in mmol, 120 is equal to 6.6 mmol/l. So let's look at a blood sugar chart, then have a chat about optimal levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Level Goals mg/dl levels mmol/l levels As you can see from this chart, a level of 6.6/ 120 is not too high. Ideally you do want it under 110 (6.1) for your morning fasting level. But lots of people do find their morning levels higher. Read this to find out why. You can also see that having a 120 (6.6) reading 2 hours after meals would be excellent and before bed a reading of 120 (6.6) is in the mid range too, so that's perfectly okay. The Most Important Number The most important number to keep in mind is 140 (7.8). You do not want to let your blood sugar levels get above 140 (7.8) for any prolonged length of time. When your blood sugar goes over 140 (7.8) this is the ‘danger' level. Having a blood sugar above 140 (7.8) for prolonged periods does some critical damage that can lead to diabetic complications, which nobody wants. So the target is always under 140 (7.8) after meals, 120 (6.6) is even better. 6.6 / 120 Blood Sugar Level Although 120 is not too high, ideally you do want to gain very good control of your blood sugar levels by following a healthy diet and doing regular exercise. If you can get your fasting level between 90-100 mg/dl (5-5.5 mmol/l), and your 2 hour reading between 120-140 mg/dl (6.6-7.8 mmol/l) then that is optimal. These are goals to work towards. While you're here be sure to grab your FREE copy of our blood sugar levels chart. It contains some great tips on lowering high levels too. You just never know when you might need Continue reading >>

Glycated Hemoglobin

Glycated Hemoglobin

Glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, A1C, or Hb1c; sometimes also referred to as being Hb1c or HGBA1C) is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average plasma glucose concentration. The test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is four months (120 days). However, since RBCs do not all undergo lysis at the same time, HbA1C is taken as a limited measure of 3 months. It is formed in a non-enzymatic glycation pathway by hemoglobin's exposure to plasma glucose. HbA1c is a measure of the beta-N-1-deoxy fructosyl component of hemoglobin.[1] The origin of the naming derives from Hemoglobin type A being separated on cation exchange chromatography. The first fraction to separate, probably considered to be pure Hemoglobin A, was designated HbA0, the following fractions were designated HbA1a, HbA1b, and HbA1c, respective of their order of elution. There have subsequently been many more sub fractions as separation techniques have improved.[2] Normal levels of glucose produce a normal amount of glycated hemoglobin. As the average amount of plasma glucose increases, the fraction of glycated hemoglobin increases in a predictable way. This serves as a marker for average blood glucose levels over the previous three months before the measurement as this is the lifespan of red blood cells. In diabetes mellitus, higher amounts of glycated hemoglobin, indicating poorer control of blood glucose levels, have been associated with cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. A trial on a group of patients with Type 1 diabetes found that monitoring by caregivers of HbA1c led to changes in diabetes treatment and improvement of metabolic control compared to monitoring only of blood or urine glu Continue reading >>

Case Report Falsely Decreased Hba1c In A Type 2 Diabetic Patient Treated With Dapsone

Case Report Falsely Decreased Hba1c In A Type 2 Diabetic Patient Treated With Dapsone

Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is an important indicator of glycemic control. The current recommendation for glycemic control based on HbA1c values has been widely accepted. However, HbA1c values depend on the lifespan of erythrocytes and the assay methods used. Here, we report the case of a patient with type 2 diabetes with unusual falling of HbA1c due to interference from dapsone treatment for leukocytoclastic vasculitis. He was a 52-year-old man, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus 5 years previously and who had been treated in our hospital in the past 3 years. Glycemia was controlled by sulfonylurea and metformin. During the 3-years follow-up period, HbA1c dropped significantly during the addition of dapsone treatment, although plasma glucose levels remained stable. HbA1c levels were raised after discontinuation of dapsone. With rechallenge of dapsone usage, HbA1c decreased again. We conclude that dapsone may be the cause of artificially low HbA1c. Other measurements to monitor glycemic control should be considered when dapsone is used for the treatment of concurrent disorders, such as autoimmune disease and pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. Continue reading >>

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