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Hba1c To Blood Glucose Conversion

Diabetes Calculators

Diabetes Calculators

HbA1c (%) Estimated Average (eAG) (mg/dL) Estimated Average (eAG) (mmol/l) 5 97 5.4 6 126 7.0 7 154 8.6 8 183 10.2 9 212 11.8 10 240 13.4 11 269 14.9 12 298 16.5 You can use the calculators on this page to convert HbA1c and estimated average blood sugars. You can also convert from mg/dL, the measurements used in the USA, and mmol which is used by most of the rest of the world. Convert Blood Sugar from US (mg/dl) to UK (mmol/L) The difference is that mg/dL is a measure of weight while mmol is a measure of volume. US: UK: (click on other box to calculate) Formulas US (mg/dl) is the UK (mmol/L) number multiplied by 18. UK (mmol/L) is the US (mg/dl) number divided by 18. Convert HbA1c to Average Blood Glucose Reading Enter HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin): % Avg. plasma blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Avg. whole blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Formulas Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mg/dl) = (HbA1c * 35.6) - 77.3 Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mmol/L) = (HbA1c * 1.98) - 4.29 Avg. whole blood glucose = Plasma Blood Glucose / 1.12 Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

Estimated Average Glucose (eag) From Hba1c

Estimated Average Glucose (eag) From Hba1c

Knowing an estimated average glucose can allow clinicians to set a goal and target for glucose levels, especially in non-compliant patients who do not check their glucose levels frequently or do not record them. Continue reading >>

Correlation Between Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) And Average Blood Glucose: Can Hba1c Be Reported As Estimated Blood Glucose Concentration?

Correlation Between Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) And Average Blood Glucose: Can Hba1c Be Reported As Estimated Blood Glucose Concentration?

Glycation is the nonenzymatic addition of sugar to amino groups of proteins. While virtually any protein in the body can be glycated, for convenience and ease of obtaining a sample, glycated hemoglobin is measured in the blood obtained from a patient. Blood glucose concentrations exhibit wide diurnal fluctuations due to food ingestion, exercise, and other factors. In contrast, the concentration of glycated hemoglobin remains relatively stable with time. This is due to the life span of red blood cells, which is usually ∼120 days. In individuals with a normal erythrocyte life span, glycated hemoglobin is directly proportional to the blood glucose concentration over the preceding 8 to 12 weeks.1 In patients with diabetes mellitus, the glycated hemoglobin value is used to determine the degree of glycemic control and to make decisions regarding therapy.2,3 In addition, the concentration of glycated hemoglobin predicts the progression of diabetic microvascular complications. This has been clearly documented by randomized, multicenter studies in patients with type 14 and type 25 diabetes. More recent evidence indicates that glycated hemoglobin also predicts cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes.6 Measurement of glycated hemoglobin is thus an essential component in the management of patients with diabetes. There are several forms of glycated hemoglobin. These include hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), HbA1 (which comprises HbA1a, HbA1b, and HbA1c), and total glycated hemoglobin (which comprises HbA1 plus other glycated hemoglobin species). Both the Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study measured HbA1c.4,5 Thus, most clinical outcome data that relate glycemic control to the complications of diabetes are based on Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Why is relating HbA1c to glucose important? We are frequently asked about the relationship between HbA1c and plasma glucose levels. Many patients with diabetes mellitus now perform self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in the home setting, and understanding the relationship between HbA1c and glucose can be useful in setting goals for day-to-day testing. HbA1c: A "Weighted" Average Many studies have shown that HbA1c is an index of average glucose (AG) over the preceding weeks-to-months. Erythrocyte (red blood cell) life-span averages about 120 days. The level of HbA1c at any point in time is contributed to by all circulating erythrocytes, from the oldest (120 days old) to the youngest. However, HbA1c is a "weighted" average of blood glucose levels during the preceding 120 days, meaning that glucose levels in the preceding 30 days contribute substantially more to the level of HbA1c than do glucose levels 90-120 days earlier. This explains why the level of HbA1c can increase or decrease relatively quickly with large changes in glucose; it does not take 120 days to detect a clinically meaningful change in HbA1c following a clinically significant change in AG. How does HbA1c relate to average glucose (AG)? In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial or DCCT (New Engl J Med 1993;329:977-986) study of patients with Type 1 diabetes, quarterly HbA1c determinations were the principal measure of glycemic control; study subjects also performed quarterly 24-hour, 7-point capillary-blood glucose profiles. Blood specimens were obtained by subjects in the home setting, pre-meal, 90 minutes post-meal, and at bed-time. In an analysis of the DCCT glucose profile data (Diabetes Care 25:275-278, 2002), mean HbA1c and AG were calculated for each study subject (n= 1439). Results showed Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

Hba1c Calculator – Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Hba1c Calculator – Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

A1c is a specific subtype of hemoglobin (Hb), the compound in the red blood cells that transports oxygen. Glucose binds slowly to Hemoglobin A and decomposes slowly as well, so the HbA1c level in your blood is an indicator of the average blood glucose level of approximately the past 4 weeks. What are good blood sugar levels? Everyone has some sugar in their blood. The normal amount of sugar in the blood ranges from about 70 mg/dL to about 120 mg/dL in people who don’t have diabetes. Blood sugar goes up after eating, but returns to the normal range in 1 or 2 hours. A good blood sugar range for most poeple with diabetes is from about 70 mg/dL to 150 mg/dL. This is before a meal – like before breakfast or 4 to 5 hours after you last meal. Your blood sugar should be less than 200 mg/dL about 2 hours after your last meal. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1c of 7% or lower. Enter your HbA1c Number: Average Blood Sugar Level: mg/dl and mmol/L Average whole blood glucose: mg/dl and mmol/L Remember: Everyone is different. A good blood sugar range for someone else may not be the best for you. For example, a blood sugar of 80 may be too low for some people. Ask you doctor what the best range of blood sugar is for you. Continue reading >>

How To Calculate Your A1c

How To Calculate Your A1c

The Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c for short) test is a blood test used to measure the average blood glucose concentration in your body in the past 1-3 months. For diabetics, this is the standard way of determining how well the diabetes is controlled. An A1c of less than 7% is considered good. Getting the test every 3 months (usually during a doctor visit) is usually enough. But sometimes you may want to just estimate your A1c level based on the data from your regular self-tests. The formula below could help in this case. Accuracy, of course, could vary depending on how often and when you check your blood sugar. I found it pretty accurate last time I used it. My calculation was off only by 0.1%. This is the same formula GlucoseTracker uses in the app's dashboard. Glucose in mg/dL: A1c = (46.7 + average_blood_glucose) / 28.7 Glucose in mmol/L: A1c = (2.59 + average_blood_glucose) / 1.59 So, for example, if your average blood glucose level in the past 3 months is 130 mg/dL (7.2 mmol/L) , your estimated A1c is 6.15%. There are also cheaper devices you can buy that will allow you to do the actual A1c tests yourself, like this one. If you need to do these tests more often, say every month, then it could save you money in the long run as lab tests could get expensive. It may not be as accurate as the lab tests, but my guess is it's probably good enough. Continue reading >>

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Tweet Use this calculator to convert HbA1c to Average Blood Sugar Level. The HbA1c level in your blood indicates what your average blood glucose level has been in the past 2 to 3 months. Everyone, whether non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, type 1 diabetic or type 2 diabetic has some degree of sugar in their blood. To convert between mg/dl and mmol/L, use our blood sugar converter. You can then convert average blood glucose levels back to HbA1c units with the calculator below. mmol/L Recommended HbA1c ranges The recommended HbA1c range for most with diabetes is to keep the value under 48 mmols/mol (under 6.5% in the old percentage units). People at risk of hypoglycemia, or for whom such tight blood glucose regulation is not advised, may be advised to keep their HbA1c below 59 mmols/mol (under 7.5% in the old percentage units). Because the two tests measure two different things, the calculator can only give an estimate and therefore there will always be some discrepancy between the value provided by the calculator and actual lab test results. How accurate are the results? The calculator looks to provide an estimate of what your HbA1c value may be based upon your average blood glucose results and vice versa. It’s important to note that HbA1c and blood glucose tests measure different things. Blood glucose tests measure the concentration of glucose molecules in the blood at a single point in time. The HbA1c test measures the proportion of haemoglobin molecules in the blood that have become chemically bonded with glucose over a period of up to 3 months. However, the calculator serves as a useful guide which can give you a close indication of what your HbA1c result might be based on your blood glucose results? What can I learn from converting my average blood glucose level to HbA1c Continue reading >>

Hba1c Conversion Chart

Hba1c Conversion Chart

The HbA1c test measures how much haemoglobin in the blood has become glycated (chemically bonded with glucose). ••••• HbA1c values have changed and are now reported as a measurement in mmols/mol instead of the percentage previously given. To make sense of the new units and compare these with old units and vice versa, use our HbA1c units converter table below. Old unit = NGSP unit = %HbA1c New unit = IFCC unit = mmol/mol HbA1c Old HbA1c New HbA1c Old HbA1c New 4.0 20 8.1 65 4.1 21 8.2 66 4.2 22 8.3 67 4.3 23 8.4 68 4.4 25 8.5 69 4.5 26 8.6 70 4.6 27 8.7 72 4.7 28 8.8 73 4.8 29 8.9 74 4.9 30 9.0 75 5.0 31 9.1 76 5.1 32 9.2 77 5.2 33 9.3 78 5.3 34 9.4 79 5.4 36 9.5 80 5.5 37 9.6 81 5.6 38 9.7 83 5.7 39 9.8 84 5.8 40 9.9 85 5.9 41 10 86 6.0 42 10.1 87 6.1 43 10.2 88 6.2 44 10.3 89 6.3 45 10.4 90 6.4 46 10.5 91 6.5 48 10.6 92 6.6 49 10.7 93 6.7 50 10.8 95 6.8 51 10.9 96 6.9 52 11.0 97 7.0 53 11.1 98 7.1 54 11.2 99 7.2 55 11.3 100 7.3 56 11.4 101 7.4 57 11.5 102 7.5 58 11.6 103 7.6 60 11.7 104 7.7 61 11.8 105 7.8 62 11.9 107 7.9 63 12.0 108 8.0 64 Sit down with your child to decide what kind of meter they would prefer out of the options available. Hypos Hypos occur when your blood glucose falls too low. PLAY A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for anyone else. Find out what… Living with diabetes during pregnancy can be challenging, but you can still lead a healthy life. Take control of your… Glucose testing is the process used to measure the amount of glucose in your blood and can be carried out… FreeStyle Optium Neo has a choice of tools designed to help people who use insulin. Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team… Continue reading >>

Hba1c

Hba1c

HbA1c Calculator With this tool you can easily convert HbA1c values from % (NGSP) to mmol/mol (IFCC) and vice versa. In addition, average blood glucose levels can be determined in mg/dL and mmol/L. By insertion of any value all other fields will update automatically. Background The International Consensus Statement of US and European Diabetes Associations recommend consistent standardization of the HbA1c determination to the IFCC1 reference measurement procedure, using the new unit mmol/mol. Since these new values in mmol/mol differ from values determined by the standardization according to NGSP2, it is recommended that HbA1c results should be reported in both units, mmol/mol (SI unit) and derived NGSP units (in %). By means of the calculator above, IFCC values in mmol/mol can be converted into NGSP values in % and vice versa. 1International Federation of Clinical Chemistry 2National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Programme Continue reading >>

Privacy And Terms And Conditions

Privacy And Terms And Conditions

Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions Privacy Perinatology.com does not collect or track personal information from web site visitors. Generic information from server logs may be used in aggregate form solely for the purpose of improving web site quality. Terms and Conditions Information contained at Perinatology.com and its links are made available under the following conditions: Changes may occur, since the last update, which affect the accuracy and availability of the information presented. Visitors are advised when making use or any decision based on information obtained from the Internet, to verify the information independently. All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither Perinatology.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary In consideration of your use of this website , perinatology.com, you covenant not to sue, and further waive, release and discharge, perinatology.com and Focus Information Technology, Inc, and any person and/or organization associated with the website from any and all claims to liability for death, personal injury, or property damage of any kind or nature, whatsoever arising out of, or in the course of, your use of this website. Neither perinatology.com or Focus Information Technology,nor any other individual, organization or other party involved in the preparation or publication of this website shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting in whole or part from any use of or reliance upon the results or values generated by the calculators or other information or materials included on this website Accessibility of services, documents, pro Continue reading >>

Heart Beat: Converting Blood Sugar To Hba1c

Heart Beat: Converting Blood Sugar To Hba1c

Like a crazed roller coaster, blood sugar rises and falls throughout the day, shooting up after a carbohydrate-heavy meal and falling with fasting or exercise. Blood sugar readings are an essential tool for people with diabetes. These readings are great snapshots, but they don't tell you anything about a more important metric — average daily blood sugar. A test that can do just that is the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test. It measures the percentage of hemoglobin molecules (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells) that have become coated with glucose (sugar). The higher the average daily blood sugar over a three-month period, the higher the HbA1c value. People who don't have diabetes typically have an HbA1c reading of 6 or lower. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

This Calculator Uses The 2007 Adag Formula To Estimate A1c And Average Blood Glucose Equivalents.

This Calculator Uses The 2007 Adag Formula To Estimate A1c And Average Blood Glucose Equivalents.

Enter a value into one of the fields below then press convert. A1c Value: Average Blood Glucose mg/dl or mmol/L Continue reading >>

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