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Hba1c Chart Results

Hba1c Conversion Chart: Mg/dl, Mmol/l (plasma/whole Blood)

Hba1c Conversion Chart: Mg/dl, Mmol/l (plasma/whole Blood)

HbA1c conversion chart: mg/dL, mmol/L (Plasma/Whole Blood) You lovely readers come from all over the world and often have trouble understanding each other's glucose levels in the forum or when chatting. Here's a handy, general, chart to give you an idea of what the other person's levels may be around. These numbers are very general and not 100%, on-the-nose, accurate. Please don't use it in any form of treatment or self-treatment. This chart is provided for our chatting purposes only. You can find more accurate charts from more reliable sources. See below for explanations of whole blood, plasma, mg/dL, and mmol/L. If your HbA1c is: Your Plasma mg/dL is around: Your Plasma mmol/L is around: Your Whole Blood mg/dL is around: Your Whole Blood mmol/L is around: 12.0% 345 19.5 308 17.4 11.0% 310 17.5 277 15.6 10.0% 275 15.5 246 13.8 9.0% 240 13.5 214 12.1 8.0% 205 11.5 183 10.3 7.0% 170 9.5 152 8.5 6.0% 135 7.5 121 6.7 5.0% 100 5.5 89 4.9 4.0% 65 3.5 31 3.1 The recommended hemoglobin A1c goal from the American Diabetes Association for NONpregnant diabetics is is 7% People without diabetes generally have an HbA1c of 6.0% or less but drops to less than 5.0% during pregnancy. That is why us pregnant diabetics are given lower goals, to stay as close to "normal" as possible. Most of the mommies I have talked to have had HbA1c goals that differed but usually fell between the 5.0%-7.0% range.The tighter you can get HbA1c levels, the lower your risk of complications. It is up to you and your healthcare team to decide on a goal considering your individual situation and without putting you at too much risk for hypoglycemia. For more information on blood glucose or blood sugar goals go here. Here's a cute explanation of the mmol/L numbers for us Americans: 4 and below, I usually feel l Continue reading >>

How To Calculate Your A1c

How To Calculate Your A1c

The Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c for short) test is a blood test used to measure the average blood glucose concentration in your body in the past 1-3 months. For diabetics, this is the standard way of determining how well the diabetes is controlled. An A1c of less than 7% is considered good. Getting the test every 3 months (usually during a doctor visit) is usually enough. But sometimes you may want to just estimate your A1c level based on the data from your regular self-tests. The formula below could help in this case. Accuracy, of course, could vary depending on how often and when you check your blood sugar. I found it pretty accurate last time I used it. My calculation was off only by 0.1%. This is the same formula GlucoseTracker uses in the app's dashboard. Glucose in mg/dL: A1c = (46.7 + average_blood_glucose) / 28.7 Glucose in mmol/L: A1c = (2.59 + average_blood_glucose) / 1.59 So, for example, if your average blood glucose level in the past 3 months is 130 mg/dL (7.2 mmol/L) , your estimated A1c is 6.15%. There are also cheaper devices you can buy that will allow you to do the actual A1c tests yourself, like this one. If you need to do these tests more often, say every month, then it could save you money in the long run as lab tests could get expensive. It may not be as accurate as the lab tests, but my guess is it's probably good enough. Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Why is relating HbA1c to glucose important? We are frequently asked about the relationship between HbA1c and plasma glucose levels. Many patients with diabetes mellitus now perform self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in the home setting, and understanding the relationship between HbA1c and glucose can be useful in setting goals for day-to-day testing. HbA1c: A "Weighted" Average Many studies have shown that HbA1c is an index of average glucose (AG) over the preceding weeks-to-months. Erythrocyte (red blood cell) life-span averages about 120 days. The level of HbA1c at any point in time is contributed to by all circulating erythrocytes, from the oldest (120 days old) to the youngest. However, HbA1c is a "weighted" average of blood glucose levels during the preceding 120 days, meaning that glucose levels in the preceding 30 days contribute substantially more to the level of HbA1c than do glucose levels 90-120 days earlier. This explains why the level of HbA1c can increase or decrease relatively quickly with large changes in glucose; it does not take 120 days to detect a clinically meaningful change in HbA1c following a clinically significant change in AG. How does HbA1c relate to average glucose (AG)? In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial or DCCT (New Engl J Med 1993;329:977-986) study of patients with Type 1 diabetes, quarterly HbA1c determinations were the principal measure of glycemic control; study subjects also performed quarterly 24-hour, 7-point capillary-blood glucose profiles. Blood specimens were obtained by subjects in the home setting, pre-meal, 90 minutes post-meal, and at bed-time. In an analysis of the DCCT glucose profile data (Diabetes Care 25:275-278, 2002), mean HbA1c and AG were calculated for each study subject (n= 1439). Results showed Continue reading >>

What Is The Hba1c?

What Is The Hba1c?

In the blood stream are the red blood cells, which are made of a molecule, haemoglobin. Glucose sticks to the haemoglobin to make a 'glycosylated haemoglobin' molecule, called haemoglobin A1C or HbA1C. The more glucose in the blood, the more haemoglobin A1C or HbA1C will be present in the blood. Red cells live for 8 - 12 weeks before they are replaced. By measuring the HbA1C it can tell you how high your blood glucose has been on average over the last 8-12 weeks. A normal non-diabetic HbA1C is <36mmol/mol (5.5%). In diabetes about 48mmol/mol (6.5%) is good. The HbA1C test is currently one of the best ways to check diabetes is under control; it is the blood test that gets sent to the laboratory, and it is done on the spot in some hospital clinics. Remember, the HbA1C is not the same as the glucose level. Coincidentally the glucose/HbA1C numbers for good control are rather similar though in the UK and Europe: glucose levels averaging 6.5 mmols/l before meals is equivalent to 60mmol/mol (7%). HbA1C (glucose levels are higher after meals) (see below). Two examples Below are two examples of people who have their HbA1c measured. One is poorly controlled, one well controlled. When should the HbA1C be measured? Measure HbA1c every 3 months if trying to improve every 6 months if very stable If your diabetes is controlled (basically an HbA1C lower than 53mmol/mol ( 7% ), every 3-6 months. But if the last reading is above 53mmol/mol (7%) and you are in reasonable health, you will need to achieve a lower level if possible, and the next reading should be sooner. This assumes you will make changes to improve your control. There is no point in having your HbA1c measured if you are not trying to achieve good control of your diabetes, although the level does predict the likelihood of co Continue reading >>

How To Improve Your Hba1c

How To Improve Your Hba1c

Everyone is obsessed with the HbA1c results. From doctors to nurses and people with diabetes, everyone is looking forward for the next HbA1c. But, what is this so famous HbA1c? HbA1c , short name for glycated haemoglobin, provides the average blood glucose levels within 8-12 weeks. When the glucose that is consumed, transformed and absorbed by your body reaches the blood stream, it gets normally attached to the red cells of the blood. The amount of glucose that is combined with the red cells is directly proportional to the total amount of sugar that is in your system at that time. Red blood cells survive in the human body for 8-12 weeks until new blood cells are produced. For that reason, it is possible to have an average of glucose concentration within this period of time, providing a useful longer-term measurement of blood glucose control. The normal range of HbA1c A normal HbA1c is considered to be around 48mmol/mol (6.5%). This means that if your regular blood glucose tests (finger pricking) are normally high, the HbA1c levels will be high or vice versa. You can also have a considered low or normal HbA1c but actually it means that you can possibly being having hypos frequently. But it is important to keep in mind that at the moment, HbA1c targets should be individualised. Everyone should discuss their own targets within their diabetes team. This target should be stablished taking to account other medical problems, age and social history of each individual. Get your free colour coded HbA1c chart (with old and new measurements) to keep in your phone, desktop or to print here. How is the HbA1c test done The HbA1c is a normal blood test that is usually taken by a phlebotomist, who will take blood from your arm and send the blood sample to a laboratory. This test should Continue reading >>

All About Your A1c

All About Your A1c

What has your blood sugar been up to lately? Get an A1C test to find out your average levelsimportant to know if youre at risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, or if youre managing diabetes. The A1C testalso known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c testis a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. Its one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes. When sugar enters your bloodstream, it attaches to hemoglobin, a protein in your red blood cells. Everybody has some sugar attached to their hemoglobin, but people with higher blood sugar levels have more. The A1C test measures the percentage of your red blood cells that have sugar-coated hemoglobin. Get a baseline A1C test if youre an adult over age 45or if youre under 45, are overweight, and have one or more risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes: If your result is normal but youre over 45, have risk factors, or have ever had gestational diabetes, repeat the A1C test every 3 years. If your result shows you have prediabetes, talk to your doctor about taking steps now to improve your health and lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Repeat the A1C test as often as your doctor recommends, usually every 1 to 2 years. If you dont have symptoms but your result shows you have prediabetes or diabetes, get a second test on a different day to confirm the result. If your test shows you have diabetes, ask your doctor to refer you to diabetes self-management education and support services so you can have the best start in managing Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin, Diabetes, And Statistics!

Hemoglobin, Diabetes, And Statistics!

In previous blog posts, I wrote about quality professional Bill Howell’s diabetes diagnosis and how he managed his disease with Lean Six Sigma. Bill wrote a book, called I Took Control: Effective Actions for a Diabetes Diagnosis, and later when I spoke with him personally, he mentioned the importance of Hemoglobin HbA1c in diagnosing diabetes and how informative this single blood component can be. What is Hemoglobin HbA1c? Hemoglobin HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average amount of sugar in blood cells over a 2-3 month period. The test can also be used to diagnose diabetes and can help diabetics manage their diabetes. If an initial test concludes HbA1c levels are below 7%, then the test is considered normal and the person is likely a non-diabetic. However, if the initial test results show levels above 7%, there is evidence the person is diabetic. I don’t know about you, but when I have blood work and tests performed as part of a visit to the doctors, I don’t take the time to think about the claims behind my tests results coming in as “normal” or “not normal,” or how that decision is made. I’ve always just accepted that if my test results fall within the acceptable range, then I’m probably in good shape. As a newly diagnosed diabetic, Howell’s first HbA1c test revealed his levels at 15.3% – a very high test result that showed he was suffering from severe diabetes. In his role as a quality professional and being a self-proclaimed “numbers junkie,” Howell made sure to find out a little bit more about why the HbA1c guidelines for diagnosing the presence of diabetes were set the way they are and just how abnormal his test results really were. Graphing the “normal” and “not normal” In Minitab Statistical Software, he created histograms (G Continue reading >>

What Do Your A1c Test Results Really Mean?

What Do Your A1c Test Results Really Mean?

The hemoglobin A1c test, as we all know, is supposed to give a sense of your average blood glucose levels over the past three months. But here’s a question for you: have you ever tried to figure out what those average blood glucose levels actually are? Say you have an A1c of 6.5% — what, in mg/dl, does that translate to? Try searching Google — it’s hard to find an answer. To quote from a post I wrote a few years ago (see entry from 4:45), that’s partially because: “Not only is there no one standardized definition as to the correlation between A1c and mean glucose levels (JDRF says 1% = 24.4 mg/dl, ADA says 28.7), but different people have different correlations. For example, if you are a ‘high glycolator’ (more glucose sticks to your hemoglobin than the average) you can have a relatively high A1c but a low mean glucose. The speaker gave the example of a patient who had a 8.2% A1c, but a mean glucose of 159 mg/dl (he was speaking using the generally accepted idea that 7% roughly equals a mean of 154 mg/dl). Treat him more aggressively, and you’ll end up with hypos. And if you’re a ‘hypoglycolator,’ it’s the opposite.” Well, just this week, a new paper was published in the American Diabetes Association’s Diabetes Care journal that provides a more solid answer to this question than I’ve seen — even though, as I must warn you, personal variability (as described above) means there’s still no precise answer. In the study, researchers wanted to find out what your average blood sugar would have to be in three situations — fasting, after meals and before bed — in order to achieve a particular A1c. Here are their results: A1c test results of 5.5-6.49% were associated with an average fasting blood glucose level of 122 mg/dl. A1c test results Continue reading >>

Hba1c Testing

Hba1c Testing

The HbA1c test measures your average blood glucose over the previous 8 to 12 weeks and gives an indication of your longer-term blood glucose control. It is used as a screening test to identify diabetes and regular monitoring tool if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. How useful is the test? HbA1c reflects the average plasma glucose (sugar in your bloodstream) over the previous 8 to 12 weeks and measures how much glucose has become stuck onto your red blood cells.(1) It can be performed at any time of the day and does not require any special preparation such as fasting. In recent years, the HbA1c test has become the preferred test for screening and diagnosis of diabetes. In 2011, the HbA1c test in New Zealand was updated to measure in millimoles per mole (mmol/mol) to align with a shift internationally (2). Prior to this, it used to be measured as a percentage (%) and you may still hear people refer to these units at times. The images below show the new and old units. Learning what your target range for HbA1c is very important. Having regular HbA1c tests helps both you and your healthcare team monitor how well your diabetes is controlled and whether any changes in lifestyle or medication are needed. Diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes As a general guide, HbA1c levels of: Less than or equal to 40 mmol/mol is normal. 41 to 49 mmol/mol is prediabetes or 'impaired fasting glucose'. 50 mmol/mol and above suggests diabetes (if symptomatic. If no symptoms of diabetes, two tests on separate occasions are needed). (3) Read more about prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. What are healthy HbA1c levels for people with diabetes? An ideal range or target HbA1c level will vary from person to person and depends on age, type of diabetes and other health conditions or sta Continue reading >>

Hba1c Conversion Chart

Hba1c Conversion Chart

The HbA1c test measures how much haemoglobin in the blood has become glycated (chemically bonded with glucose). ••••• HbA1c values have changed and are now reported as a measurement in mmols/mol instead of the percentage previously given. To make sense of the new units and compare these with old units and vice versa, use our HbA1c units converter table below. Old unit = NGSP unit = %HbA1c New unit = IFCC unit = mmol/mol HbA1c Old HbA1c New HbA1c Old HbA1c New 4.0 20 8.1 65 4.1 21 8.2 66 4.2 22 8.3 67 4.3 23 8.4 68 4.4 25 8.5 69 4.5 26 8.6 70 4.6 27 8.7 72 4.7 28 8.8 73 4.8 29 8.9 74 4.9 30 9.0 75 5.0 31 9.1 76 5.1 32 9.2 77 5.2 33 9.3 78 5.3 34 9.4 79 5.4 36 9.5 80 5.5 37 9.6 81 5.6 38 9.7 83 5.7 39 9.8 84 5.8 40 9.9 85 5.9 41 10 86 6.0 42 10.1 87 6.1 43 10.2 88 6.2 44 10.3 89 6.3 45 10.4 90 6.4 46 10.5 91 6.5 48 10.6 92 6.6 49 10.7 93 6.7 50 10.8 95 6.8 51 10.9 96 6.9 52 11.0 97 7.0 53 11.1 98 7.1 54 11.2 99 7.2 55 11.3 100 7.3 56 11.4 101 7.4 57 11.5 102 7.5 58 11.6 103 7.6 60 11.7 104 7.7 61 11.8 105 7.8 62 11.9 107 7.9 63 12.0 108 8.0 64 Sit down with your child to decide what kind of meter they would prefer out of the options available. Hypos Hypos occur when your blood glucose falls too low. PLAY A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for anyone else. Find out what… Living with diabetes during pregnancy can be challenging, but you can still lead a healthy life. Take control of your… Glucose testing is the process used to measure the amount of glucose in your blood and can be carried out… FreeStyle Optium Neo has a choice of tools designed to help people who use insulin. Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team… Continue reading >>

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

What is considered a ‘normal reading’ for the HbA1c calculator? Recommended HbA1c readings fall within the reference range of 6.5 to 7%. This implies that for every 100 red blood cells, 6-7 cells have glucose attached to them. Mean blood sugar levels can be better understood from the following table. HbA1c-Average Blood Glucose Reading % mmol/L mg/dL Inference 3-4 2-4 36-72 Extremely low to low blood sugar 4.5 5.5 99-100 Perfect! 4.5-5 5-6 90-108 Normal range for non-diabetics (pre-prandial) 5.5 - 6 7 – 8 126 - 144 Normal post-prandial in non-diabetics 6.5 – 7 9 - 10 162 - 180 Maximum post-prandial in non-diabetics 6.5 – 7.5 9 – 11 162 - 198 High, even for diabetics 7.5 – 9.5 11 – 15 198 - 270 Indicates to poorly controlled bG 12.5 - 25 20 - 25 360 - 450 Extremely high > 19 33 or > 33 > 594 High possibility of serious electrolyte imbalance!! Key: Blood Glucose, post-prandial, After meal, Pre-prandial, Before meal Micromat™, Diastat™, VARIANT™, Immunoturbidimetric, hemoglobin testing system, diabetes monitoring, beta-thalassemia, hemoglobinopathy, sickle cell disease Rough Glucose Conversions: mmol/L → mg/dL : Multiply by 18 mg/dL → mmol/L: Divide by 18 (or multiply by 0.055) Or, you could simply use Medindia’s Blood Sugar Converter available at or our HbA1c1c1c(A1c) Calculator for Blood Glucose. Since glucose binds slowly to Hemoglobin A (and decomposes at about the same rate), the HbA1c count is a good indicator of average blood glucose over a period of time. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1c of 7% (implying 7 cells out of every 100 have an appendage of blood glucose) or lower. But deciding upon a generalized “perfect blood sugar” value is impossible as this varies from person to person. Instruments to Measure HbA1c1c T Continue reading >>

Hba1c

Hba1c

HbA1c Calculator With this tool you can easily convert HbA1c values from % (NGSP) to mmol/mol (IFCC) and vice versa. In addition, average blood glucose levels can be determined in mg/dL and mmol/L. By insertion of any value all other fields will update automatically. Background The International Consensus Statement of US and European Diabetes Associations recommend consistent standardization of the HbA1c determination to the IFCC1 reference measurement procedure, using the new unit mmol/mol. Since these new values in mmol/mol differ from values determined by the standardization according to NGSP2, it is recommended that HbA1c results should be reported in both units, mmol/mol (SI unit) and derived NGSP units (in %). By means of the calculator above, IFCC values in mmol/mol can be converted into NGSP values in % and vice versa. 1International Federation of Clinical Chemistry 2National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Programme Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Hba1c: Where Are You Now?

Hba1c: Where Are You Now?

Summary On 3 October 2011, laboratories in New Zealand and internationally changed the way HbA1c results are reported. The change makes it much easier to compare HbA1c results from different laboratories and research trials around the world. What is the new HbA1c? The measurement is in millimoles per mole (mmol/mol) instead of a percentage (%). Please note that while the results of the units are different, the test stays the same. Resources for people with diabetes Use the right-hand links to access resources to help you better understand your new HbA1c number. The resources are: a wallet card – HP5405 a factsheet – HP5406. Also included is the HbA1c laboratory data formal change notification letter. Ordering information These resources can be ordered in hard copy. Please note that 100 copies of the wallet cards and factsheets are sent for each single order. Please specify which item you are requesting. Further information can be found on the Ordering printed publications page. Continue reading >>

What Is Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes?

What Is Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes?

In order to effectively manage diabetes, it is said that you need to keep the blood sugar level and the HbA1c levels under check. So, what is this HbA1c level? Is there a test for the same? The answers to all such questions shall be answered in the article that will follow. Join in for the article “What is Hemoglobin or HbA1c Test for Diabetes?” What is the Test About? Let us understand first why such a test is needed for diabetes patients in the first place. Well, as we know, it is very important for diabetes patients to continuously monitor their blood glucose levels. This test helps to monitor the blood glucose levels over the last two to three months. This test is not only useful in analyzing whether you have diabetes but also helps in understanding if any extra medication is required by the diabetes patient. The test is known by different names such as HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, as well as glycohemoglobin. What Does the HbA1c Test Tell You? As per the results of the test, one can find out whether one is diabetic or not. For healthy people, the hemoglobin A1c levels should be between 4% and 5.6%. If your A1c levels are somewhere around 5.7% to 6.4%, it signifies that you have a higher risk of contracting diabetes. Anything above 6.4% of the A1c level will mean that you already have diabetes. Let’s understand the good and bad level of hb(A1C) by below chart: For conducting the test, a sample of the blood is usually taken from the patient’s arms. Also, in a few known cases, a sample of a single drop of blood may also be taken in order to check the level of hemoglobin present in the blood. How Does the HbA1c Test Work? Hemoglobin is the protein found in the red blood cells of the blood which is also responsible for the red color of our blood. The main tas Continue reading >>

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