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Green Tea And Blood Sugar Spikes

Effect Of Green Tea On Blood Glucose Levels And Serum Proteomic Patterns In Diabetic (db/db) Mice And On Glucose Metabolism In Healthy Humans

Effect Of Green Tea On Blood Glucose Levels And Serum Proteomic Patterns In Diabetic (db/db) Mice And On Glucose Metabolism In Healthy Humans

Abstract Green tea is widely consumed in Asian countries and is becoming increasingly popular in Western countries. Epidemiologically, it has been suggested that green tea consumption prevents type 2 diabetes. The present study was aimed at providing evidence of improvement in glucose metabolism in diabetic mice and healthy humans upon green tea consumption. Green tea promoted glucose metabolism in healthy human volunteers at 1.5 g/body in oral glucose tolerance tests. Green tea also lowered blood glucose levels in diabetic db+/db+ mice and streptozotocin-diabetic mice 2–6 h after administration at 300 mg/kg without affecting serum insulin level, whereas no effect was observed in control mice (+m/+m and normal ddY mice). The serum protein profiles of db+/db+ and +m/+m mice were analyzed for the first time by SELDI (surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization)-TOF (time-of-flight)-MS (mass spectrometry), and then compared to investigate any effects of oral green tea administration on serum proteins. The protein profiles in db+/db+ mice showed that the spectral peak intensities at the mass/charge ratios (m/z) of 4119, 4203, 4206, 4211, 4579, 9311 and 18691 were >3 times lower, and those of 13075, 17406, 17407, 17418, 17622, 18431 and 26100 were >3 times higher than respective peak intensities in +m/+m mice. When green tea was administered to db+/db+ mice, the peak intensities were markedly decreased at m/z 11651 and 11863, and slightly decreased at m/z 4212. The peak intensities at 7495, 7595, 7808, 14983, 15614, 31204 were markedly increased after the administration. The present study provides evidence that green tea has an antidiabetic effect. Although we could not find simple reversed effect of green tea on the diabetes-induced modifications of the levels of several Continue reading >>

3 Tips To Combat The Fat Storage Hormone!

3 Tips To Combat The Fat Storage Hormone!

‘Fat storage hormone’… sounds horrific doesn’t it? Well, unfortunately it does exist. Personally I want to burn fat rather than storing! I believe most of you feel the same, right? Today, I would like to talk about how we can avoid over producing the fat storage hormone. The answer is insulin! Our pancreas creates a hormone called insulin, which transports glucose into our body’s cells where it is used for energy. When we are getting too much glucose by eating sugars (dairy products are also sugar!), refined grains, or other carbohydrate-rich foods lacking fiber, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which our body can’t break down and stores as fat. The more glucose (sugar) in your blood, the more insulin you produce. So Getting control of your blood sugar is the key! Blood sugar levels can also affect how hungry and energetic we feel as well! An insulin surge can cause too much blood sugar to be transported out of our blood and this results in our blood sugar and insulin levels dropping below normal. This leaves us feeling tired and lethargic and wanting to eat more. The unfortunate result of this scenario is we want to eat something else with high sugar content. When we do, the cycle begins all over again. When our body does not use the glucose in our blood, then it will be stored as fat. That is bad news enough, but it can be even worse. Too much insulin hinders the body’s ability to breakdown fat that has already been stored. So… WHAT CAN WE DO? These are 3 action steps to control your blood sugar level EAT OFTEN – eat every 3 to 4 hours! Sounds fabulous doesn’t it? Most people eat 2 -3 big meals per day. They go 6 to 8 hours without foods. When you don’t eat for that long time, your blood sugar level really drops. And then when you eat more th Continue reading >>

Green Tea And Diabetes Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

Green Tea And Diabetes Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

Five green tea and diabetes studies show how tea may regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin action. When you have diabetes, your body is not very good at converting blood sugar into energy. This can happen in two ways: The body does not make enough insulin, a hormone that causes glucose to enter the body’s cells to be converted into energy or fat. The body cells do not respond properly to insulin i.e. low insulin sensitivity. Often, both mechanisms do not work properly. Without treatment, diabetics can build up high glucose levels in many parts of the body, causing damage to eyes, kidney, nerves and blood vessels. Increasingly, scientific studies are showing that drinking green tea or consuming tea extract can help by Blocking glucose absorption Improving insulin actions Regulating blood sugar levels Green Tea and Diabetes Benefit #1: Block Glucose Absorption A 2008 study conducted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst investigated the effects of tea and wine had on people with type 2 diabetes. The researchers discovered that these beverages inhibit an enzyme called alpha-glucosidase, which causes glucose to be absorbed more slowly from the small intestine into the body. "Levels of blood sugar, or blood glucose, rise sharply in patients with type 2 diabetes immediately following a meal," says Shetty, one of the food scientists who published the research. "Red wine and tea contain natural antioxidants that may slow the passage of glucose through the small intestine and eventually into the bloodstream and prevent this spike, which is an important step in managing this disease." Red and white wines, black, oolong, white and green teas were all tested. Red wine was found to be 5 times more effective than white wine. Black tea was the most effective, followed Continue reading >>

Green Tea Controls Sugar Spikes

Green Tea Controls Sugar Spikes

Penn State food scientists found that when mice were fed an antioxidant found in green tea called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) at the same time they were given cornstarch, their blood #sugar spiked much less than when they were given the cornstarch alone. There was a 50 percent reduction in blood sugar with a dose equivalent to about 1.5 cups of green tea for a human. According to the scientists, the green tea needs to be consumed while you’re eating the starch, not after. “Green tea could help [people to] control the typical blood sugar increases that are brought on when they eat starchy foods, like breads and bagels that are often a part of typical breakfasts.” Interestingly, the EGCG had no significant effect on blood sugar spikes in mice that were fed glucose or maltose, according to the researchers. Don’t add sugar to your green tea it will probably counteract the positive effects. Tags: blood sugar green tea sugar Continue reading >>

Green Tea Helps Lower Blood Sugar Spikes

Green Tea Helps Lower Blood Sugar Spikes

Eating starchy foods may cause blood sugar levels to increase, but food scientists from Penn State found that drinking green tea while eating these foods may help lower these spikes by half. Green tea contains a compound called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, or EGCG, which has been found in previous studies, to have antioxidant effects. A new study conducted by Joshua Lambert, assistant professor of food science in agricultural sciences, found that feeding mice with EGCG at the same time as they eat starch reduced their blood sugar spikes about 50% lower than mice which ate starch but did not take the compound. This may be a significant finding for humans, since the dose of EGCG fed to them was comparable to 1 ½ cups of green tea, which could help control blood sugar spikes when eating starchy foods like bagels or other breads. Upon testing for the green tea compound’s effects in eating other carbohydrates such as glucose or maltose, the researchers found that there were no significant effects. This may be explained by the way the starch is converted to glucose in the body, through an enzyme alpha-amylase, which EGCG may inhibit. They also found that the compound reduced alpha-amylase activity in the pancreas by about one-third. These findings further suggest that it may be best to eat starchy foods with green tea, but one must refrain from adding sugar to the drink in order not to negate its beneficial effects. The researchers published their report online in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. Source: Penn State. Drinking green tea with starchy food may help lower blood sugar spikes. ScienceDaily. Tags: blood sugar level spikes, eating starchy food, green tea compound, starch converted to sugar, sugar spikes Disclaimer: The information on this site is not intended Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

Drinking Green Tea With Starchy Food May Lower Your Blood Sugar Spikes

Drinking Green Tea With Starchy Food May Lower Your Blood Sugar Spikes

Blood sugar spikes could be reduced by consuming an ingredient present in green tea, according to the latest research conducted by Penn State food scientists. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate or EGCG is an ingredient act as antioxidant found in green tea was given to mice with starchy food such as corn starch. Researchers found significant reduction in blood sugar spikes of mice received EGCG with corn starch in comparison to those mice that were not fed the compound, according to Joshua Lambert, assistant professor of food science in agricultural sciences. “The spike in blood glucose level is about 50 percent lower than the increase in the blood glucose level of mice that were not fed EGCG,” Lambert said. This study was published in the online version of Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. The dose administered to mice was equal to one and half cup of green tea for a human. The effectiveness of EGCG in reducing blood sugar is dependent upon starchy food. In case of humans if they want to have reduced blood sugar such as those suffering from diabetes should take green tea with starchy food such as breads and bagels that are often a part of typical breakfasts. “If what you are eating with your tea has starch in it then you might see that beneficial effect,” Lambert said. “So, for example, if you have green tea with your bagel for breakfast, it may reduce the spike in blood glucose levels that you would normally get from that food.” Researchers did not find any significant effect of EGCG on blood sugar when they gave EGCG with glucose or maltose to mice during this study. Lambert said that the” reason blood sugar spikes are reduced when the mice ate starch, but not these sugars, may be related to the way the body converts starch into sugar.” Researchers have Continue reading >>

Green Tea Lowers The Blood Sugar Level

Green Tea Lowers The Blood Sugar Level

High blood levels of glucose and insulin predispose people to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and are associated with accelerated aging. For many people, sugar is the primary culprit in the accumulation of body fat. One animal study showed a significant reduction in body fat in response to green tea catechin supplementation. Diabetes, or “sugar diabetes,” as it is most commonly referred to, is broken down into two main classes. Type One: Insulin Dependent Diabetes (IDDM) Type Two: Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes (NIDDM) Other forms of diabetes include gestational diabetes (during pregnancy), water diabetes, and several other rare types of diabetes. Diabetes is a disease characterized by the insufficient secretion or improper functioning of insulin. Insulin regulates the amount of blood sugar in our tissue. Improper absorption of blood sugar leads to excess concentrations that must be released through urine. If this continues for long periods of time, it can lead to a number of more serious illnesses. Green Tea Lowers the Blood Sugar Level Green tea polyphenols and polysaccharides are effective in lowering blood sugar. Another study showed that green tea extract reduced the normal elevation of glucose and insulin when 50 grams of starch were ingested. The polyphenol group of green tea catechins has been shown to lower blood sugars, as well as the polysaccharides in green tea. In fact, researchers have found that EGCG (also known as epigallocatechin gallete, one of the catechin polyphenols) influences the primary way that glucose is absorbed. EGCG may also help diabetics by mimicking the actions of insulin and inhibiting the liver’s production of glucose, thus lowering blood sugar. The liver produces some glucose, but the most common sugar spikes occur from the Continue reading >>

What You Need To Drink Before And After Meals To Prevent Weight Gain And Diabetes

What You Need To Drink Before And After Meals To Prevent Weight Gain And Diabetes

How Blood Sugar Spikes Work Blood sugar is essentially the sugar found in the bloodstream which gives energy to the cells it is transported to. It gets into the bloodstream through the absorption of the nutrients in the foods we eat, and is how energy is transported through the body. Our bodies naturally regulate our levels of blood sugar, however if you have diabetes, your body doesn’t do this as effectively meaning your blood sugar levels can spike or dip which can be dangerous. Generally speaking, the higher the sugar content of the meal (or if there are a lot of carbs which the body turns into sugar) the greater the spike and the following crash. Some of the negative effects of these spikes in the short term include tiredness, blurred vision, and generally feeling unwell. Long-term, repeated blood sugar spikes could lead a person to have a greater risk of developing complications such as heart disease. It is, therefore, critical that you take the necessary steps to prevent these spikes. 7 Ways to Balance Blood Sugar Here are 7 ways that you can make sure your blood sugar levels will remain stable, or at the very least avoid seeing them spike. By targeting the meals you’re eating you will have the most direct impact possible on blood sugar levels. In addition, following these tips will help prevent weight gain, and chronic fatigue, and if you don’t already have diabetes it can help prevent that too. 1) Get enough fiber Be sure to include plenty of fiber in your meals, not only does this help the general digestion process, moving digested food through your gut, but it can help lower cholesterol and improve blood glucose control. You should aim for around half of your plate to be made up of vegetables as these will provide plenty of fiber. The best vegetables you Continue reading >>

Does Green Tea Lower Blood Sugar? Answers Revealed

Does Green Tea Lower Blood Sugar? Answers Revealed

Green tea has long been used as a medication since the early discovery of tea. It has also been widely utilized in traditional medicine to control blood sugar levels. With this assumption, people, especially diabetes patients, have made green tea a part of their diet in the hopes to lower blood spikes and to improve insulin levels. With regards this claim, a few medical studies have shown that green tea supplementation might reduce blood sugar levels in people with borderline diabetes. Food scientists from the Pennsylvania State University learned that green tea and starchy foods might help regulate blood sugar spikes. The study concentrated on green tea's EGCG component against the body's ability to convert starch to sugar. Therefore, green tea and cornstarch has been consumed simultaneously in the process. The study has involved laboratory mice as subjects where blood sugar spikes in mice fed with green tea and cornstarch were found to be 50% lesser than those that were not. This perhaps demonstrates the ability of green tea to regulate blood sugar rise brought by the consumption of starchy foods. If the same result could hold true to people, then green tea will definitely be an excellent addition to the diabetes diet. image source: kanko, wikimedia commons Tags: Tea Health Men's Health Women's Health Green Tea Herbal Tea Continue reading >>

The Superstar Catechin That Balances Your Blood Sugar

The Superstar Catechin That Balances Your Blood Sugar

Did you know…that drinking green tea with starchy food may lower blood sugar spikes? Keeping your blood sugar levels balanced is a prerequisite for a disease-free life. High blood sugar (blood glucose) is proven to raise your risk for diabetes and heart disease and accelerate aging. When blood sugar levels spike, body fat accumulates and it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain or lose weight. Obesity in turn contributes to serious medical conditions such as heart attack and stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, gallbladder disease, and osteoarthritis. Science has uncovered a gem of a cure to control and lower blood sugar naturally. A low dose of green tea can stabilize blood sugar levels by limiting the amount of glucose that passes through the intestine and into the bloodstream. What is it about Green Tea? According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, green tea helps prevent and treat diabetes by increasing insulin activity by more than 15-fold. Your body produces insulin to control the amount of blood sugar absorbed by your tissues. Diabetics suffer from ill-functioning insulin; not enough glucose is absorbed into the tissues and excess blood sugar accumulates in the bloodstream. Animal studies have shown that substances in green tea called polysaccharides mimic insulin and lower blood sugar levels by restricting the amount of glucose the liver produces. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, green tea made from unfermented leaves is also the best source of catechin polyphenols—potent antioxidants shown to: Suppress the growth of cancer cells Prevent free radical damage to cells and tissues The Superstar Catechin That Balances Your Blood Sugar A study conducted by Penn State researchers and published last month in Molecular Nutrition and F Continue reading >>

Green Tea Shown To Block Carbohydrate Breakdown To Prevent Blood Glucose Spikes

Green Tea Shown To Block Carbohydrate Breakdown To Prevent Blood Glucose Spikes

(NaturalNews) Rapidly changing levels of blood glucose as a response to eating a high carbohydrate meal is now widely recognized as a trigger for many chronic illnesses ranging from heart disease to cancer, metabolic dysfunction and diabetes. Researchers have uncovered a host of naturally occurring compounds that slow the release of glucose from carbohydrates after consumption, or help to usher sugar into our cells where it is used for energy metabolism. Chromium is a mineral that is essential for proper glucose utilization, and resveratrol has been shown to improve insulin signaling to help prevent metabolic dysfunction. Green tea has long been hailed for its high level of polyphenol antioxidants, most specifically the catechin known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Food scientists from Penn State have released the result of a study in the journal, Molecular Nutrition & Food Research to explain how EGCG helps reduce blood sugar spikes in mice that may lead to new diet strategies for people. The scientists explain that glucose metabolism in mice is similar to humans and provides an accurate model to gauge efficacy in experimental models. To determine the effect of EGCG on blood glucose spikes after eating, researchers separated mice into several groups based on body weight. After a period of fasting, the mice were given corn starch, maltose, or sucrose. One group of mice received EGCG along with the feed, while a control group was not fed the compound. The researchers then tested the blood sugar levels of both groups. Green tea extract blocks an enzyme that breaks down carbs to prevent glucose spikes The group of mice fed the bioactive EGCG compound had a significant reduction in their blood sugar levels after eating corn starch, but not the maltose or sucrose suga Continue reading >>

Black Tea Inhibits Diabetes

Black Tea Inhibits Diabetes

Everybody knows green tea is healthier than black tea. Right? Well, not so fast! Though green tea has received much acclaim because of its superstar antioxidant content, black tea, it turns out, does more to lower blood sugar. Black tea contains a polysaccharide that works very much the way pharmaceutical diabetes drugs work, according to a new study out of Tianjin University in China. It's been known for some time that tea offers benefits to diabetics, but previous research hasn't compared the various kinds of tea to see which works best. This study compared the effects of green tea, black tea, and oolong. Although all three types of tea come from the same type of plant -- camellia sinensis -- they get processed differently, and it is the processing that creates differences in flavor and composition. Black tea undergoes the most processing and is fully fermented; green tea, which is unfermented, undergoes the least, and oolong tea fits right into the middle. The natural assumption is that less processing is better, and in fact, green tea does preserve its antioxidant content better, plus has less caffeine. It's the catechins in green tea that confer all those health benefits, and in processing, those catechins convert into other compounds. Still, according to Dr. John Weisburger of the Institute for Cancer Prevention, "Whether it's green or black, tea has about eight to 10 times the [antioxidants] found in fruits and vegetables." Plus, a closer look at what happens to the catechins in the process of making black tea reveals that they simply convert into other antioxidants -- theaflavins and thearubigens, which, although probably not as powerful as catechins, do confer health benefits that just now are starting to be investigated. Studies have shown that in addition to Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Does Green Tea Affect Postprandial Glucose, Insulin And Satiety In Healthy Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Does Green Tea Affect Postprandial Glucose, Insulin And Satiety In Healthy Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Go to: Abstract Results of epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of green tea could lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Intervention studies show that green tea may decrease blood glucose levels, and also increase satiety. This study was conducted to examine the postprandial effects of green tea on glucose levels, glycemic index, insulin levels and satiety in healthy individuals after the consumption of a meal including green tea. The study was conducted on 14 healthy volunteers, with a crossover design. Participants were randomized to either 300 ml of green tea or water. This was consumed together with a breakfast consisting of white bread and sliced turkey. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Participants completed several different satiety score scales at the same times. Plasma glucose levels were higher 120 min after ingestion of the meal with green tea than after the ingestion of the meal with water. No significant differences were found in serum insulin levels, or the area under the curve for glucose or insulin. Subjects reported significantly higher satiety, having a less strong desire to eat their favorite food and finding it less pleasant to eat another mouthful of the same food after drinking green tea compared to water. Green tea showed no glucose or insulin-lowering effect. However, increased satiety and fullness were reported by the participants after the consumption of green tea. The mean (± SEM) hunger, sickness, desire, fullness, and pleasantness scores in fourteen healthy subjects after the ingestion of a green tea meal (•) and a reference meal (▲). * Significant difference between the meals according to Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test (P ≤ 0.05). The mean (± SEM) incremental hunger, sickness, des Continue reading >>

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