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Glucose Tolerance Test In Slide Share

Clinical Overview Of Diabetes Mellitus Slide Share Located At: Youtube (2) (abbreviated Audio.

Clinical Overview Of Diabetes Mellitus Slide Share Located At: Youtube (2) (abbreviated Audio.

Clinical Overview of Diabetes Mellitus Slide share located at: YouTube (2) (abbreviated audio. Published by Jesse Hardy Modified over 2 years ago Presentation on theme: "Clinical Overview of Diabetes Mellitus Slide share located at: YouTube (2) (abbreviated audio." Presentation transcript: 1 Clinical Overview of Diabetes Mellitus Slide share located at: YouTube (2) (abbreviated audio with PowerPoint located at): All information on blog, slide share, and YouTube are contained within this PowerPoint. No additional material is present. You should only review slide share and YouTube is this makes your studying more efficient. 2 Objectives 1.Know definitions of: pre-diabetic state, impaired glucose tolerance, and Diabetes Mellitus. 2.Understand etiologies of DM. 3.Understand acute DM complications. 4.Understand chronic DM complications. 5.List the Quality Improvement markers of DM. 3 Format Lecture format. Not a Socratic exchange. Test questions: multiple choice questions with only one correct answer. Testable material: You will find the crossroads sign present when the material is testable. Material not having the crossroads sign is for context: to make the testable material more understandable. 4 Objective one: Know definitions of: pre-diabetic state impaired glucose tolerance Diabetes Mellitus. 5 Objective one: Know definitions of: pre-diabetic state: fasting plasma glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dL. impaired glucose tolerance Diabetes Mellitus. 6 Objective one: Know definitions of: pre-diabetic state impaired glucose tolerance: plasma glucose of 140 to 199 mg/dL 2 hours after a 75-g oral glucose load. Patients with pre-diabetic state or impaired glucose tolerance are at higher risk for the future development of diabetes Pre-diabetic state or impaired glucose tolerance: more u Continue reading >>

Alopecia, Oligomenorrhea, Glucose Tolerance Test Abnormal: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

Alopecia, Oligomenorrhea, Glucose Tolerance Test Abnormal: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

(2-hour oral glucose tolerance test), to predict the risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [obgyn.ucla.edu] PCOS Clinical Features Hyperandrogenism Hirsutism Modified Ferriman Gallwey Score Acne Androgenic alopecia Menstrual Irregularity Oligomenorrhea (70-75%) [slideshare.net] Increased production or sensitivity to androgens commonly leads to hirsutism (male-patterned hair growth), acne, or alopecia (thinning or loss of scalp hair). [ae-society.org] This test measures the levels of blood glucose and cortisol levels at the different time intervals after the introduction of synthetic insulin. [symptoma.com] [] phosphorus, glucose and thyrotropin Measure serum PTH if patient has hypocalcemia Hypogonadism should be investigated in post-menarchal female adolescents presenting in oligomenorrhea [pedclerk.bsd.uchicago.edu] [] outside reference range Type 1 diabetes Fasting glucose/HbA1c Autoimmune parathyroid disease Bone profile check PTH if low calcium Vitiligo Physical examination only Alopecia [bjgp.org] Blood tests during these visits will help your doctor make sure the medication dose is correct. [cincinnatichildrens.org] Signs and Symptoms of Thyrotoxicosis Symptoms Nervousness Fatigue Weakness Palpitations Heat intolerance Excessive sweating Dyspnea Diarrhea Insomnia Poor concentration Oligomenorrhea [clevelandclinicmeded.com] [] loss of interest in sex itchy skin with raised itchy swellings (urticaria) nails become loose menstrual problems in women, especially lighter periods or absence of periods alopecia [medicalnewstoday.com] GH measurements may be done after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), where positive findings are GH in excess of 1ng/ml. [symptoma.com] ZMPSTE24) SHORT syndrome:(PIK3R1) Auto-inflamatory syndromes (PSMB8) Nakajo-Nishim Continue reading >>

Maternal Insulin Resistance And Transient Hyperglycemia Impact The Metabolic And Endocrine Phenotypes Of Offspring

Maternal Insulin Resistance And Transient Hyperglycemia Impact The Metabolic And Endocrine Phenotypes Of Offspring

Maternal insulin resistance and transient hyperglycemia impact the metabolic and endocrine phenotypes of offspring Section of Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology, Joslin Diabetes Center and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts *S. Kahraman and E. Dirice contributed equally to this article. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: R. N. Kulkarni, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02215 (e-mail: [email protected] ). Received 2014 May 7; Accepted 2014 Sep 9. Copyright 2014 the American Physiological Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Studies in both humans and rodents suggest that maternal diabetes leads to a higher risk of the fetus developing impaired glucose tolerance and obesity during adulthood. However, the impact of hyperinsulinemia in the mother on glucose homeostasis in the offspring has not been fully explored. We aimed to determine the consequences of maternal insulin resistance on offspring metabolism and endocrine pancreas development using the LIRKO mouse model, which exhibits sustained hyperinsulinemia and transient increase in blood glucose concentrations during pregnancy. We examined control offspring born to either LIRKO or control mothers on embryonic days 13.5, 15.5, and 17.5 and postpartum days 0, 4, and 10. Control offspring born to LIRKO mothers displayed low birth weights and subsequently rapidly gained weight, and their blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were higher than offspring born to control mothers in early postnatal life. In addition, concentrations of plasma leptin, glucagon, and active GLP-1 were higher in control pups from LIRKO mothers. Analyses of the endocrine pancreas revealed significantly reduced -cell a Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt) : Principle, Procedure, Indications And Interpretation

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt) : Principle, Procedure, Indications And Interpretation

The Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) is the most sensitive test for detecting borderline diabetes mellitus. Glucose tolerance means ability of the body to utilize glucose in the circulation. It is indicated by the nature of blood glucose curve following the administration of glucose. Thus “glucose tolerance test” is a valuable diagnostic aid in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, impaired beta-cell functionnand sometimes reactive hypoglycemia and acromegaly. GTT is of two types depending upon the route of glucose administration : Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT) OGTT is mostly preferred and is explained in detail here. IVGTT may be chosen for patients who are unable to absorb an oral dose of glucose (eg. malabsorption syndrome). Principle of Glucose Tolerance Test Following a standard oral dose of glucose, plasma and urine glucose levels are monitored at regular intervals, in order to measure tolerance under defined conditions. Indications and Contraindications for OGTT Indications The OGTT is indicated in following conditions : Patients having symptoms suggestive of diabetes mellitus, but fasting blood sugar value is inconclusive (between 100-126 mg/dl). During pregnancy, excessive weight gaining is noticed, with a past history of big baby (more than 4 kg) or a past history of miscarriage. To rule out benign renal glucosuria. Contraindications There is no indication of doing OGTT in following conditions: Person with confirmed diabetes mellitus. OGTT has no role in follow up of diabetes. It is indicated only for the initial diagnosis. The test should not be done in acutely ill patients. Procedure for OGTT Patient Preparation The patient should be on balanced diet, containing normal daily requirement of car Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Estimation

Blood Glucose Estimation

Q.1-What is the level of Fasting blood glucose in normal health? Answer- Fasting blood glucose (FPG) is measured after an overnight fast of 10 hrs. (1) FPG 7.0mmol/L (126 mg/dL) warrants the diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Q.2- What is Random blood Glucose? What is its significance? Answer-Random is defined as without regard to time since the last meal. Random Blood Glucose (RBG) measurement is required only during emergency. The current criteria for the diagnosis of DM emphasize that the FPG is the most reliable and convenient test for identifying DM in asymptomatic individuals. A random plasma glucose concentration >11.1 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) accompanied by classic symptoms of DM (polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss) is sufficient for the diagnosis of DM. Q.3- What is the difference between Post load blood glucose and postprandial blood glucose? Answer-Post load blood glucose means blood glucose level 2 hours after a glucose load as it is done in Oral glucose tolerance test. Post prandial means blood glucose 2 hours after a normal meal. Q.4- Why is plasma sample preferred over serum sample for estimation of blood glucose? Answer- Plasma has the advantage over serum since the blood can be immediately added to a mixture of anticoagulant and preservative and can be processed immediately. If serum is used, there is a delay in processing the sample since it takes nearly 20-30minutes for the serum to get separated from the blood and in that span some glucose is metabolized by anaerobic glycolysis and falsely low levels are obtained. Hence on practical grounds plasma is a preferred choice over serum. Q.5- What is the purpose of adding preservative to the blood sample(collected for estimation of blood glucose) before processing? Answer- Red blood cells possess glycolytic enzy Continue reading >>

Insulin Tolerance Test

Insulin Tolerance Test

An insulin tolerance test (ITT) is a medical diagnostic procedure during which insulin is injected into a patient's vein, after which blood glucose is measured at regular intervals. This procedure is performed to assess pituitary function, adrenal function, and sometimes for other purposes. An ITT is usually ordered and interpreted by endocrinologists. Insulin injections are intended to induce extreme hypoglycemia below 2.2 mmol/l (40 mg/dl). Patient must have symptomatic neuroglycopenia to trigger counter-regulatory cascade. Glucose levels below 2.2 nmol/L are insufficient absent symptoms. The brain must register low glucose levels. In response, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and growth hormone (GH) are released as a part of the stress mechanism. ACTH elevation causes the adrenal cortex to release cortisol. Normally, both cortisol and GH serve as counterregulatory hormones, opposing the action of insulin, i.e. acting against the hypoglycemia.[1] Thus ITT is considered to be the gold standard for assessing the integrity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. Sometimes ITT is performed to assess the peak adrenal capacity, e.g. before surgery. It is assumed that the ability to respond to insulin induced hypoglycemia translates into appropriate cortisol rise in the stressful event of acute illness or major surgery.[2] This test is potentially very dangerous and must be undertaken with great care, because it can iatrogenically induce the equivalent of a diabetic coma. A health professional must attend it at all times. Other provocation tests which cause much less release of growth hormone include the use of glucagon, arginine and clonidine. Side effects[edit] Side effects include sweating, palpitations, loss of consciousness and rarely convulsions due to severe Continue reading >>

Classification, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Classification, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

University of Gondar, Ethopia *Corresponding Author: Habtamu Wondifraw Baynes Lecturer Clinical Chemistry University of Gondar, Gondar Amhara 196, Ethiopia Tel: +251910818289 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Baynes HW (2015) Classification, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes Mellitus. J Diabetes Metab 6:541. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000541 Copyright: © 2015 Baynes HW. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the presence of chronic hyperglycemia either immune-mediated (Type 1 diabetes), insulin resistance (Type 2), gestational or others (environment, genetic defects, infections, and certain drugs). According to International Diabetes Federation Report of 2011 an estimated 366 million people had DM, by 2030 this number is estimated to almost around 552 million. There are different approaches to diagnose diabetes among individuals, The 1997 ADA recommendations for diagnosis of DM focus on fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), while WHO focuses on Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). This is importance for regular follow-up of diabetic patients with the health care provider is of great significance in averting any long term complications. Keywords Diabetes mellitus; Epidemiology; Diagnosis; Glycemic management Abbreviations DM: Diabetes Mellitus; FPG: Fasting Plasma Glucose; GAD: Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase; GDM: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus; HDL-cholesterol: High Density Lipoprotein cholesterol; HLA: Human Leucoid Antigen; IDD Continue reading >>

Serum Glycated Albumin To Guide The Diagnosis Of Diabetes Mellitus

Serum Glycated Albumin To Guide The Diagnosis Of Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract In the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is sometimes measured to determine the need of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However, HbA1c does not accurately reflect glycemic status in certain conditions. This study was performed to test the possibility that measurement of serum glycated albumin (GA) better assesses the need for OGTT. From 2006 to 2012, 1559 subjects not known to have diabetes or to use anti-diabetic medications were enrolled. Serum GA was measured, and a 75-g OGTT was then performed to diagnose diabetes. Serum GA correlated significantly to age (r = 0.27, p<0.001), serum albumin (r = –0.1179, age-adjusted p = 0.001), body mass index (r = -0.24, age-adjusted p<0.001), waist circumference (r = -0.16, age-adjusted p<0.001), and plasma GA (r = 0.999, p<0.001), but was unaffected by diet (p = 0.8). Using serum GA at 15% for diagnosis of diabetes, the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve were 74%, 85%, and 0.86, respectively. Applying a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) value of < 100 mg/dL to exclude diabetes and of ≥ 126 mg/dL to diagnose diabetes, 14.4% of the study population require an OGTT (OGTT%) with a sensitivity of 78.8% and a specificity of 100%. When serum GA value of 14% and 17% were used to exclude and diagnose diabetes, respectively, the sensitivity improved to 83.3%, with a slightly decrease in specificity (98.2%), but a significant increase in OGTT% (35%). Using combined FPG and serum GA cutoff values (FPG < 100 mg/dL plus serum GA < 15% to exclude diabetes and FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL or serum GA ≥ 17% to diagnose diabetes), the OGTT% was reduced to 22.5% and the sensitivity increased to 85.6% with no change in specificity (98.2%). In the diagnosis of diabetes, seru Continue reading >>

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

Severely Fluctuating Blood Glucose Levels Associated With A Somatostatin-producing Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumor

A 68-yr-old nondiabetic woman with an ovarian tumor was suffering from hyper- and hypoglycemia. Based on the results of an oral glucose tolerance test and continuous glucose monitoring, we speculated that the fluctuating blood glucose level was accompanied not only by a low insulin level but also by low counter-regulatory hormones levels, and that those broad hormonal suppressions were caused by a high somatostatin level produced in the ovarian tumor. We performed an oophorectomy and assessed the pathology of the tumor and changes in the blood glucose profile as well as hormonal levels postoperatively. The blood glucose level was completely normalized after the oophorectomy. Insulin secretion was also normalized. Histological examination showed that the tumor comprised a mature cystic teratoma and a stromal carcinoid. Immunohistochemically, the stromal carcinoid component was positive for somatostatin. The somatostatin level was 8505 pmol/liter preoperatively, which dropped down to 71.5 pmol/liter postoperatively. We found two previous reports of somatostatin-producing ovarian neuroendocrine tumors. Somatostatin levels among cases of ovarian origin were much higher than those among cases of gastrointestinal origins, and cases of ovarian origin all experienced blood glucose fluctuations. A 14-yr-old girl presented with left hip pain showing bilateral metaphyseal bone collapse accompanied with posterior-inferior displacement of capital femoral epiphyses after 2.5 yr of GH treatment. Blood chemistry, showing high levels of alkaline phosphatase and PTH, and a transiliac bone biopsy, indicating severe osteomalacia with osteitis fibrosa, along with serial computed tomography images of the hips from the presymptomatic stage, led to accurate diagnosis and successful treatment b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Problems Associated With The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Gestational Diabetes: Problems Associated With The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Gestational diabetes: problems associated with the oral glucose tolerance test Empowering Healthcare at the United Arab Emirates M.M. Agarwal(a),, J. Punnose(b), G.S. Dhatt (c) (a) Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, UAE University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (b) Department of Medicine, Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (c) Department of Pathology, Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Received 16 June 2003; received in revised form 31 July 2003; accepted 5 August 2003 The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) remains the cornerstone for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM). Due to its multiple problems (expensive, non-physiologic, unpleasant, poor reproducibility, time consuming) [1], the American Diabetic Association (ADA) [2] no longer recommends the OGTT for routine clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in non-pregnant adults. However, the ADA and all other major expert panels like the World Health Organization continue to use it as the gold-standard for the diagnosis of GDM, though the quantity of glucose used, the diagnostic criteria and the cut-off values are different [1]. This study was undertaken to highlight the problems of using the OGTT for the diagnosis of GDM. The United Arab Emirates is a multi-ethnic community with a very high prevalence of GDM and multi-parity resulting in a high percentage of pregnant women undergoing the diagnostic OGTT [3]. During a 5-year period (May 1997April 2002), 5142 patients underwent a 3h, 100gm OGTT at the University hospital, of which 503 (9.8%) could not be completed due to problems associated with the test. All these women were at a high-risk for GDM being pre-screened by history or the glucose challenge test. The data on the failed OGTT and the outcome of these pregn Continue reading >>

Getting Tested

Getting Tested

You’ll need to get your blood sugar tested to find out for sure if you have prediabetes or type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Testing is simple, and results are usually available quickly. Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Prediabetes Your doctor will have you take one or more of the following blood tests to confirm the diagnosis: A1C Test This measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 or 3 months. An A1C below 5.7% is normal, between 5.7 and 6.4% indicates you have prediabetes, and 6.5% or higher indicates you have diabetes. Fasting Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar after an overnight fast (not eating). A fasting blood sugar level of 99 mg/dL or lower is normal, 100 to 125 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 126 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Glucose Tolerance Test This measures your blood sugar before and after you drink a liquid that contains glucose. You’ll fast (not eat) overnight before the test and have your blood drawn to determine your fasting blood sugar level. Then you’ll drink the liquid and have your blood sugar level checked 1 hour, 2 hours, and possibly 3 hours afterward. At 2 hours, a blood sugar level of 140 mg/dL or lower is considered normal, 140 to 199 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Random Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar at the time you’re tested. You can take this test at any time and don’t need to fast (not eat) first. A blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Result* A1C Test Fasting Blood Sugar Test Glucose Tolerance Test Random Blood Sugar Test Normal Below 5.7% 99 mg/dL or below 140 mg/dL or below Prediabetes 5.7 – 6.4% 100 – 125 mg/dL 140 – 199 mg/dL Diabetes 6.5% or Continue reading >>

Screening Tests Every Woman Needs With Pictures

Screening Tests Every Woman Needs With Pictures

The earlier you find breast cancer, the better your chance of a cure. Small breast-cancers are less likely to spread to lymph nodes and vital organs like the lungs and brain. If youre in your 20s or 30s, some experts recommend that your health care provider perform a breast exam as part of your regular check-up every one to three years. You may need more frequent screenings if you have any extra risk factors. Mammograms are low-dose X-rays that can often find a lump before you ever feel it, though normal results dont completely rule out cancer. Some experts recommend that while youre in your 40s you should have a mammogram every year. Then during your 50s through your 70s, you can switch to every other year. Of course, your doctor may recommend more frequent screenings if youre at higher risk. Cervical cancer (pictured) is easy to prevent. The cervix is a narrow passageway between the uterus (where a baby grows) and the vagina (the birth canal). Your doctor may use Pap smears and or HPV testing to screen. Pap smears find abnormal cells on the cervix, which can be removed before they ever turn into cancer. The main cause of cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV), a type of STD. During a Pap smear, your doctor scrapes some cells off your cervix and sends them to a lab for analysis. Your doctor will talk to you about whether you need a pap test alone or in combination with HPV testing. She will also talk to you about how often you need to be screened. If you're sexually active and at risk, you'll need vaginal testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea every year. Osteoporosis is a state when a persons bones are weak and fragile. After menopause, women start to lose more bone mass, but men get osteoporosis, too. The first symptom is often a painful break after even a m Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

A metabolic disorder of multiple etiology characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with disturbance of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism resulting from defects of insulin secretion, action or both *Gestational diabetes mellitus is any degree of glucose intolerance during pregnancy raised blood glucose level >7.8 mmol/L 2 hours post-prandial OGTT Previous history of recurrent abortion or unexplained stillbirth Congenital abnormalities: cardia and neural tube defect v Ultrasound : early for dating v : detailed TRO fetal abnormality After 12-14 weeks gestations as soon as the risk factors are identified. In women whose GTT is normal but have significant risk factors, a repeat test must be perform at 24-28 weeks gestation and again at 32-34 weeks gestation. Give patient to drink 75g glucose+ 250ml water ,drink in 10-15min. Dietary Control (D/C)- by dietitian (Requirement: 30 35 kcal/kg per day for non-obese and 25kcal/kg per day for obese patient) v difficult to establish tight control failed D/C (start insulin after 2 weeks on diet control(IV) ) fetal macrosomia (AC > 95th centile) between 29 33 week gestation despite good glycaemic control require 3 or 4 daily doses of insulin. 2 forms of insulin used in combination: *educate the pt about correct way of insulin injection. fetal supervision with ultrasound for growth and well being usually every trimester. Do before starting and also to monitor insulin therapy 2-hour postprandial capillary level < 7.0 mmol/L If on insulin- terminate by 38th week If on D/C can prolonged till 40th weeks Omit morning dose of insulin injection. pain relief epidural is ideal monitor fetal heart closely, CTG Capillary blood sugar on admission and follow sliding scale: To inform registrar start (IV bolus 10ml dextrose 50% if <2mmol/L) Infor Continue reading >>

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The term diabetes mellitus describes a metabolic disorder of multiple aetiology characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The effects of diabetes mellitus include long–term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs. Diabetes mellitus may present with characteristic symptoms such as thirst, polyuria, blurring of vision, and weight loss. In its most severe forms, ketoacidosis or a non–ketotic hyperosmolar state may develop and lead to stupor, coma and, in absence of effective treatment, death. Often symptoms are not severe, or may be absent, and consequently hyperglycaemia sufficient to cause pathological and functional changes may be present for a long time before the diagnosis is made. The long–term effects of diabetes mellitus include progressive development of the specific complications of retinopathy with potential blindness, nephropathy that may lead to renal failure, and/or neuropathy with risk of foot ulcers, amputation, Charcot joints, and features of autonomic dysfunction, including sexual dysfunction. People with diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular disease. The development of diabetes is projected to reach pandemic proportions over the next10-20 years. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) data indicate that by the year 2025, the number of people affected will reach 333 million –90% of these people will have Type 2 diabetes. In most Western societies, the overall prevalence has reach Continue reading >>

Slideshare - Wikipedia

Slideshare - Wikipedia

LinkedIn SlideShare is a Web 2.0 based slide hosting service . Users can upload files privately or publicly in the following file formats: PowerPoint , PDF , or OpenDocument presentations. Slide decks can then be viewed on the site itself, on hand held devices or embedded on other sites. [2] Launched on October 4, 2006, the website is considered to be similar to YouTube , but for slideshows. It was acquired by LinkedIn in 2012. [3] The website was originally meant to be used for businesses to share slides among employees more easily, but it also has expanded to become a host of a large number of slides that are uploaded merely to entertain. [4] Although the website is primarily a slide hosting service, it also supports documents, PDFs, videos and webinars . [5] SlideShare also provides users the ability to rate, comment on, and share the uploaded content. 6October 2006; 11 years ago(2006-10-06) The website gets an estimated 80 million unique visitors a month, [6] [7] and has about 38 million registered users. [8] SlideShare's biggest competitors include Zoho.com , Scribd.com , Issuu and edocr . Some of the notable users of SlideShare include The White House , NASA , World Economic Forum , State of Utah , O'Reilly Media , Hewlett Packard and IBM . SlideShare was officially launched on October 4, 2006. Rashmi Sinha , the CEO and co-founder of SlideShare is responsible for partnerships and product strategy. She was named amongst the world's Top 10 Women Influencers in Web 2.0 by FastCompany . [9] [ dead link ] Jonathan Boutelle [10] is the CTO of SlideShare and came up with the initial idea behind the website. He wrote the first version of the site. On May 3, 2012, SlideShare announced [11] that it was to be acquired by LinkedIn . It is reported that the deal was $118.75 Continue reading >>

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