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Glucose Sticks

More Diabetics To Receive Free Glucose Sticks Daily - Tvm News

More Diabetics To Receive Free Glucose Sticks Daily - Tvm News

More diabetics to receive free glucose sticks daily Health Minister Chris Fearne has announced that monitors and glucose sticks will be given for free to more patients who suffer from different forms of diabetes. In last years scheme, four free glucose sticks daily were distributed to those who suffer from Type 1 Diabetes, and from July of this year, these sticks also started being distributed to those who suffer from Type 2 Diabetes. By the end of this year, all diabetes patients in all areas of the island will be covered by this free government scheme. The patients who are entitled to the glucose sticks will be receiving a letter from the Central Procurement and Supplies Unit (CPSU), as well as a letter of information from the Pharmacy of Your Choice (POYC). The patient needs to present these documents to the pharmacy where he is registered, together with a doctors prescription which indicates the number of times the patient should be checking his blood sugar level, which will entitle him to up to a limit of 4 glucose sticks daily. In answer to a PQ by Labour MP Rosianne Cutajar, Minister Fearne also announced that discussions are underway so that as from near year, monitors and glucose sticks will be given to Type 2 Diabetes patients who are receiving other treatment apart from insulin. Continue reading >>

Measure Blood Glucose Accurately

Measure Blood Glucose Accurately

While each facility and each at home patient will have their own brand of glucometer, most are pretty similar. The big thing is to have the correct test strips for each machine. Many hospitals have glucometers that automatically chart the results electronically, while Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF) and at home patients must document manually. Tips on How to Measure Blood Glucose Accurately with a Capillary Blood Glucose Meter FTC required Disclaimer: I receive commissions for purchases made through commercial links on this website. Also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. Many facilities still have cleaning the finger with alcohol as part of the procedure . This is really unnecessary when taking a CBG (Capillary Blood Glucose) but many nurses feel it’s easier to open an alcohol wipe than to ask the patient to wash their hands if dirty. The only thing alcohol in that small amount does is to de-fat the finger of natural oils and makes the stick hurt just a little more. All that is needed is a finger that is clean. If you DO use alcohol, make sure that the finger is completely dry before obtaining the blood sample. No, don’t blow on the finger, let it air dry for a few seconds. Taking a sample with a finger damp with alcohol can give inaccurate results. Make sure the finger is warm. If cool, you will have a harder time getting a sufficient amount of blood. You can have the patient hang their arm down to assist in blood flow. You can “milk” the finger from knuckle to fingertip to push the blood to the end. Don’t just keep squeezing the fingertip. Excessive squeezing and pinching of the finger can lead to an inac Continue reading >>

Hi, Freestyle Libre System. Bye, Routine Fingersticks (1).

Hi, Freestyle Libre System. Bye, Routine Fingersticks (1).

Have diabetes? This glucose monitoring tool could revolutionize your life with fast, reliable results without the need for routine fingersticks1. Daily diabetes monitoring hurts. If you or a loved one has diabetes, you’re probably familiar with the tedious routine of glucose monitoring. The painful finger pokes to draw a drop of blood. The daily fingerstick calibrations. Or the expensive, bulky CGM equipment. For many, that's been the reality. But what if you could take the pain and inconvenience out of glucose monitoring? What if you could transform the way people with diabetes manage their condition? Well, today, you can. For the 30 million Americans who have diabetes2, the approval of the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is a significant stride in offering new options for people with diabetes in the United States. We've introduced a revolutionary system that eliminates the hurdles of traditional glucose monitoring. No routine fingersticks1. No fingerstick calibrations. How does the FreeStyle Libre System work? Abbott's FreeStyle Libre system measures glucose levels through a small sensor applied to the back of your upper arm. The sensor, which is the size of two stacked quarters, provides real-time glucose readings for up to 10 days, both day and night3. The sensor can also read glucose levels through clothes4, making testing discreet and convenient. The FreeStyle Libre system provides people with diabetes three key pieces of data with each scan: a real-time glucose result, an 8-hour historical trend, and a trend arrow showing the direction their glucose is going. The touch-screen reader holds up to 90 days of data, which allows people to track their glucose levels over time. Across the globe, more than 400,00 Continue reading >>

Will High-tech Skin Put An End To Needle Sticks For Diabetes?

Will High-tech Skin Put An End To Needle Sticks For Diabetes?

Painful and inconvenient, needle sticks are part of daily life for many people with diabetes. Wouldn’t it be great if there were some high-tech wearable that could monitor blood glucose levels continuously and noninvasively — that is, without the need to pierce the skin? We’re not there yet, but we’re getting closer. The FDA just approved a skin patch with a small through-the-skin wire that delivers glucose readings wirelessly to a wand-like reader — but the patch must be replaced every 10 days. And researchers at MIT are doing very preliminary research on tattoos that change appearance to indicate changing glucose levels. Now University of Chicago scientists have taken these ideas a step further. Working with rodents, they’ve endowed skin itself with the ability to track blood glucose and are at work on a system that could give at-a-glance insights into all kinds of blood values. The team, led by cell biologist Dr. Xiaoyang Wu, used stem cells and the gene-editing technique CRISPR to create skin cells that emit fluorescent light in a particular pattern as blood glucose levels rise. The light is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected by a tiny electronic sensor that might be embeddable in a wristwatch or bracelet. A GENTLE HEADS-UP If this preliminary research pans out, the skin sensor-and-device combination could make possible continuous, noninvasive monitoring of blood levels of cholesterol, sodium, iron, bilirubin, and liver and kidney enzymes as well as glucose. A gentle vibration, ring, or flash would alert wearers when levels got out of whack — and possibly alert their doctors or caregivers. The system Wu is developing might even be able to spot tumor cells in the blood that indicate the presence of cancer — and Wu suspects it might also be Continue reading >>

Heel Sticks: Overview, Periprocedural Care, Technique

Heel Sticks: Overview, Periprocedural Care, Technique

Heel stick is a minimally invasive and easily accessible way of obtaining capillary blood samples for various laboratory tests, especially newborn screens and glucose levels. However, thanks to improved laboratory techniques that require smaller sample volumes and improved automated heel lancing devices that minimize trauma and pain, [ 1 ] heel stick is a viable method of obtaining blood for many routine blood tests. [ 2 ] Heel stick sampling can also help preserve venous access for future intravenous (IV) lines. Some evidence exists that in term neonates, skilled venipuncture may result in fewer total punctures and less pain than heel stick. A Cochrane review first published in 1999 and updated in 2011 suggests that it may in fact be the procedure of choice in this population. [ 3 ] However, these results may not be extrapolatable to preterm infants or infants who require multiple or frequent blood sampling. [ 4 ] In addition, the development of newer, more effective, and less painful lancing devices may increase the relative utility of heel stick. Heel stick blood sampling is indicated whenever capillary blood is an acceptable source. Such situations include the following: Another acceptable source of blood (eg, central venous catheter , umbilical catheter , arterial line) is not already available Heel stick samples can be used for general chemistries and liver function tests, complete blood counts (CBCs), toxicology, newborn screening, bedside glucose monitoring, and blood gas analysis. [ 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ] Heel stick should not be performed if any significant injury, infection, anomaly, or edema is present on the sampling area of the heel. [ 9 ] At present, coagulation studies may not be performed with capillary samples. Blood tests that require relatively larger samp Continue reading >>

No More Routine Finger Sticks(1) For Americans With Diabetes: Abbott′s Freestyle® Libre Approved In The U.s.

No More Routine Finger Sticks(1) For Americans With Diabetes: Abbott′s Freestyle® Libre Approved In The U.s.

- Revolutionary system to replace blood glucose monitoring, eliminating the need for routine finger sticks(1) and finger stick calibration - Easy-to-use(2), longer lasting and less bulky(3) than other continuous monitors available in U.S. - Studies show that people who use the FreeStyle Libre System test their glucose levels more frequently and spend less time in hypoglycemia(4,5) ® Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System as a replacement1 for blood glucose monitoring (BGM) for adults with diabetes in the U.S. This revolutionary new glucose sensing technology eliminates the need for routine finger sticks1 and is the only personal continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that does not require finger stick calibration. Designed to be approachable, accessible and affordable for the 30 million people with diabetes in America6, the FreeStyle Libre system reads glucose levels through a sensor that is worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 10 days, making it the longest lasting personal glucose sensor available in the U.S. The BGM replacement indication means that people with diabetes and their physicians can now make treatment decisions based on information from the FreeStyle Libre system, without the need for painful routine finger sticks1—and at a fraction of the cost of other CGM systems currently available7. "Today, we are celebrating a breakthrough moment for people with diabetes in the U.S.—an end to the worry and hassles associated with routine finger sticks which have been the standard of glucose testing for more than 40 years," said Jared Watkin, senior vice president, Diabetes Care, Abbott. "At Abbott, we believe that FreeStyle Libre will transform diabetes management and we're proud to be at the forefront of innovation that empowers people to take control of their Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in diabetes management, a blood glucose test is typically performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'. Different manufacturers use different technology, but most systems measure an electrical characteristic, and use this to determine the glucose level in the blood. The test is usually referred to as capillary blood glucose. Healthcare professionals advise patients with diabetes mellitus on the appropriate monitoring regimen for their condition. Most people with type 2 diabetes test at least once per day. The Mayo Clinic generally recommends that diabetics who use insulin (all type 1 diabetics and many type 2 diabetics) test their blood sugar more often (4-8 times per day for type 1 diabetics, 2 or more times per day for type 2 diabetics),[1] both to assess the effectiveness of their prior insulin dose and to help determine their next insulin dose. Purpose[edit] Blood glucose monitoring reveals individual patterns of blood glucose changes, and helps in the planning of meals, activities, and at what time of day to take medications.[2] Also, testing allows for quick response to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This might include diet adjustments, exercise, and insulin (as instructed by the health care provider).[2] Blood glucose meters[edit] Main article: Glucose meter Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1991–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters are typically below 15 seconds). A blood glucose meter is an electronic device for measuring the blood Continue reading >>

Finger-stick Glucose Monitoring

Finger-stick Glucose Monitoring

Since its introduction three decades ago, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) using finger-stick blood samples, test strips, and portable meters has aided diabetes management, principally by enabling patients—particularly those treated with insulin—to become full partners along with health professionals in striving for excellent glycemic control. Over time the use of glucose meters has become easier and faster with smaller and smaller blood samples yielding results in a matter of seconds. For this reason, glucose meters are now increasingly used in hospital wards, intensive care units, and other facilities such as dialysis units and infusion centers to provide point-of-care results that would take much longer through routine laboratory channels. This technology has largely taken the guess work out of diabetes management. Without such technology, intensive glucose control such as that achieved in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial may not have been demonstrated to prevent or decrease microvascular complications; insulin pump therapy would not really be practical; and hypoglycemia would remain an even greater source of anxiety for patients and their families than it already is. We have come to rely so much on finger-stick glucose that it is easy to forget its limitations. In considering this we will discuss accuracy, specificity, and, in light of those, inappropriate usage. Accuracy Although there is no universally binding standard, guidelines issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) are widely acknowledged. ISO guideline 15197 suggests that for glucose levels <75 mg/dl, a meter should read within 15 mg/dl of the reference sample, and for levels ≥75 mg/dl, the reading should be within 20%. A meter also should be able to meet t Continue reading >>

Finger-stick Glucose Monitoring

Finger-stick Glucose Monitoring

Go to: Accuracy Although there is no universally binding standard, guidelines issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) are widely acknowledged. ISO guideline 15197 suggests that for glucose levels <75 mg/dl, a meter should read within 15 mg/dl of the reference sample, and for levels ≥75 mg/dl, the reading should be within 20%. A meter also should be able to meet these targets in at least 95% of the samples tested (1). Several examples serve to illustrate the implications of this degree of imprecision. Assuming a meter does indeed meet the ISO guideline, then a true glucose level of 55 mg/dl could in fact yield an SMBG reading of as low as 40 or as high as 70 mg/dl, and occasionally (1 time in 20) a reading beyond those limits. While a reading of 40 mg/dl is likely to prompt corrective action that could be quite appropriate for a true value of 55 mg/dl, the same is not likely to be the case for a reading of 70 mg/dl, which in many instances will be regarded by the patient as reassuring, if not cause for congratulation. This could be particularly inappropriate—and hazardous—in a patient with hypoglycemia unawareness whose glucose of 55 mg/dl is “on the way down” rather than stable or increasing. At the other end of the spectrum, a true value of 350 mg/dl might register as low as 280 or as high as 360 mg/dl. Because all of these values are obviously much higher than desirable in any circumstance, it could be argued that this is of no consequence because they all should lead to glucose-lowering action. But this is true only up to a point since in these days of insulin infusion algorithms aimed at achieving excellent glycemic control in intensive care situations and the use of premeal corrective insulin doses in patients using multiple dos Continue reading >>

Meals To Live Introduces New Glucose Quick Sticks

Meals To Live Introduces New Glucose Quick Sticks

Meals to Live Introduces New Glucose Quick Sticks Convenient blood sugar boost for people with diabetes in stores in November Nov 14, 2011, 06:18 ET from Meals to Live DALLAS, Nov. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Meals to Live , the first and only grocery store line of frozen meals created specifically for people living with diabetes, adds a new product to its line - Glucose Quick Sticks , an easy-to-carry, quick-dissolving flavored powder packet that provides a healthy boost of glucose for those with challenges. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a complication that can affect anyone living with diabetes. Meals to Live's Glucose Quick Sticks come in two tasty flavors, watermelon and sour apple, and can be taken on a moment's notice without liquid to correct low blood sugar quickly and conveniently. "For people living with diabetes, anything to simplify day-to-day low blood sugar struggles and replace flavorless oversized tabs, messy gel tubes and liquids is a huge win," said Dr. Steve Edelman, professor of medicine at the University of California San Diego. "Meals to Live is making living with diabetes easier for millions of adults and children with products like Glucose Quick Sticks that offer a simple, tasty solution to treating low blood sugar, which is a common problem they face." The sticks can be easily stored in a purse, lunchbox, backpack, pocket or desk drawer until needed. Each stick provides 9-10 grams of sugar-based carbohydrates per serving. Glucose Quick Sticks will be available in select Kroger, Fred Meyer and Ralph's grocery stores beginning November 2011 and are currently available at www.mealstolive.com . Suggested retail price for Quick Sticks is $5.99 for a package of 12 sticks, which are each 9-10 grams per stick. Meals to Live also offers a grocery store Continue reading >>

Abbott Glucose Monitor Eliminates Finger Sticks, Receives Ce Mark

Abbott Glucose Monitor Eliminates Finger Sticks, Receives Ce Mark

Some European diabetics may soon find they no longer need finger sticks to manage their disease. That's because Abbott's ($ABT) FreeStyle Libre Flash has received a CE mark. The system uses a small sensor attached to the back of the arm to detect glucose levels via a tiny filament. And, unlike other continuous glucose monitors, this one doesn't require a twice-daily finger-stick blood glucose measurement for calibration. Getting rid of the finger stick for diabetics while maintaining sufficient accuracy without calibration is a long-held industry goal and could prove a boon to patients. "The FreeStyle Libre System fulfills a major need for people living with diabetes," Robert Ford, Abbott's SVP of Diabetes Care, said in a statement. "Our customers told us that the pain, inconvenience and indiscretion of finger pricking were the key reasons they weren't managing their diabetes as well as they should." The system includes a small sensor--about the size of a quarter or a two-euro coin--that can be worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. It has a small filament (5 mm long and 0.4 mm wide) that is inserted just under the skin and is held in place by an adhesive pad. A handheld reader is then scanned within 1 cm to 4 cm over the sensor each time to get a glucose result. Scanning takes about one second and can be done over clothing. The reader holds up to 90 days of glucose level data. With each reading, the user receives a current glucose reading, an 8-hour history and information on the direction the glucose levels are headed. There are 382 million diabetics globally, 56 million of whom live in Europe. The number of diabetics is expected to grow by more than 20% by 2035, according to the International Diabetes Federation. The system will be available for sale "i Continue reading >>

Glucose Quick Sticks

Glucose Quick Sticks

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. My Dd just discovered Quick Sticks sour apple at a recent camp. I was told I could get them at Walgreens, Walmart or online. I haven't had any luck with all 3 and the website doesn't appear to be working. Does anyone know if this company has gone out of business? I haven't seen them in a while at Walmart. My daughter liked them at first, but then after using them once or twice hated them. She said it felt like she was choking down an entire package of pixie sticks all at once! I don't mind them if I have nothing else with me and can't grab a snack but if you're low and you're a bit shaky and trying to open the darn thing it goes everywhere. This happened to me at work because I ignored my low so went ever lower and was trying to open it and I was shaking so bad that it went everywhere ..looked really bad with this white ish powder all over my desk lol i think they might have. I can't find them anywhere either (in store or online). According to their facebook page, they're changing the name & packaging. I bought the last of my local Walgreens' supply off the clearance shelf. They said it's a discontinued product. Our Walmarts say the same. I was able to get the last 2 boxes from a Walmart online. Not sure how long she'll like them but when it comes to Diabetes it's always nice to find something different. I also emailed the company after seeing the address on the side of the container. If I get a response I'll post it. My daughter loves quicksticks and skittles but the skittles are a pain for treating late night lows. And she's starting to hate juice boxes at night. We've been on the same mad hunt for them in colorado. We bought out the stock at a walgreens and or Continue reading >>

Newborn Blood Glucose Sticks

Newborn Blood Glucose Sticks

I have a question. I would like to hear from other nurses, what you do in your hospital regarding blood glucose testing in newborns. Here's our basic protocol. Any infant over 3800 grams, any infant over 40 weeks, any infant below 2500 grams, and any infant before 37 weeks has their blood sugar tested per protocol. The protocol is every hour x 3 hours, then every three hours x 24 hours. This seems a bit over the top for me. 3800 grams is around 8 1/2 pounds! The last place I worked, we did it if they were over 4500 grams, and then only once (unless it was low, they exhibited signs of low sugar, or they weren't nursing well). These poor babes are getting so many sticks, their heels are black and blue. Some docs specifically order it to be dc'd after three normal CBGs--but many don't. Is this similar to your facility routines? I would like to say something, to push for updating these protocols to a more baby-friendly schedule--but perhaps this is the norm? What is your blood sugar protocol? Where do your references and standards for your protocols come from? Continue reading >>

Glucose Quick Sticks Review

Glucose Quick Sticks Review

By now you all may be inclined to think that Sysy doesnt do negative product reviews. But sadly, heres one for ya. I got some On the Go Glucose Quick Sticks recently which I tested out the other morning for a low I experienced. This product boasts a 100% daily serving of Vitamin C and an on the go delivery method that needs no water. There are 10 grams of glucose per serving (meaning youd probably more than one to treat a low). It comes in flavors such as watermelon and sour apple. So the other day, I confirmed my low blood sugar and tore one of the sour apple sticks open. They just so happen to resemble jumbo pixie sticks with a powdery fine filling. I poured half of a stick in my mouth and gagged. Something out there actually tastes worse than glucose tablets. Then, because I was low and shaky and my tongue was numb, I started to choke on the powdery glucose. You sort of chuck it from the packet down your throat and its all too easy to choke on, in my opinion. Maybe not the best for young children. Or maybe just me. The fun didnt stop there. Since I was shaky and flustered, I fumbled the darn thing (which is as light as a feather) and dropped it. Powder filled the air and settled all over my desk, keyboard, and carpet. The only thing it did right, once I opened a second packet and downed it, was get my sugar up quickly. But the main ingredient is glucose and thats its only job. I feel like a glucose delivery product should taste decent and function well in a diabetics sweaty, trembling hands-because thats our reality. So if you see this at the store next to your glucose tablets, look away and grab your bottle of tabs. Better yet, I recommend Glucolift glucose tablets. Now theres a well thought out product for a diabetic. Continue reading >>

New Products For Low Blood Sugars

New Products For Low Blood Sugars

I dont know about you, but Im pretty tired of the old-school glucose tabs on the market today. Even my favorite flavor (watermelon), leaves my mouth feeling a tad chalky! It would be nice to have options. And now, we do! Both of these companies kindly sent me a sample of their products to taste and review: Quick Sticks are designed for fast-acting absorption of glucose because they are made with dextrose, these little packets come with several unique benefits compared to other choices like juice-boxes or tabs for treating hypoglycemia. They taste, feel and look like a PixieStick! Delicious in 2 flavors: watermelon and sour apples. They go down really, really easily. I poured one packet into my mouth with 3 small pours, and there was nothing leftover. Within seconds, I had treated my blood sugar. No yucky aftertaste or chalky feeling all over my mouth. The dextrose had absorbed, and disappeared! Gluten-free with 10 grams of carbohydrate per packet. GlucoLift is a new, all natural glucose tab with a very different list of ingredients compared to the tabs we know today. Fast-acting and gluten-free, these tabs come with a few unique traits : Flavored completely naturally with cherries in the cherry tabs, berries in the berry tabs, and orange and creme in the orange-creme tabs! There are no artificial dyes, or chemicals, unlike traditional tabs They are not chalky! These tabs feel and taste like candy. Approved by TCOYD for treating diabetes, with a percentage of profits going towards InsulinDependence and the organization 1% for the Planet. And of course, both options cant spill or rot, compared to juice-boxes, which can be easily squished, ruining the inside of a nice bag. They can also rot when left in a hot car too long, or freeze in a cold car! We all have our own meth Continue reading >>

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